22-year-old’s disappearance a ‘nightmare’ for worried mom

first_imgRichmond Police Dept. (RICHMOND, Ky.) — Weeks after a 22-year-old mysteriously vanished, her mother is desperate for answers and pleading with her daughter to “please, please come home to us.”Savannah Spurlock, who lives with her mother in Richmond, Kentucky, was last seen on Friday, Jan. 4, leaving a bar in Lexington, according to Richmond police.Spurlock, a mother of four, left the bar with three men she met there, according to Richmond Assistant Chief of Police Rodney Richardson.Those men have been identified and questioned, Richardson told ABC News Monday. Meanwhile, Spurlock hasn’t been seen since.Ellen Spurlock said the last time she spoke to her daughter was via Facetime around 3 a.m. on Jan. 4. Ellen Spurlock said her daughter was in a car with at least three other people at the time.“She told me she was fine. When I asked her where she was, she said she was in Lexington,” Ellen Spurlock told ABC News Sunday night. “She promised she would be home later that morning. She did not seem out of the ordinary.”“I don’t know anything about her relationship with the men that she was with,” she added. “When she Facetimed me I did not recognize the gentleman driving the car. I had never seen him before. I could not see who was in the back of the car because it was so dark out. But I heard voices talking over each other — that’s how I knew there were at least two individuals in the back seat of the vehicle.”It’s not clear if the men Savannah Spurlock left the bar with were the same people she was in a car with while talking to her mother, Richardson said.No one has been charged, Richardson said, and while police have not ruled out charges, he said their focus is on the search for Spurlock.The 22-year-old is believed to be in danger, Richardson said. There’s no indication she ran away, he said.Police have not ruled out anything — including the possibility of foul play, he said.The worried mother, concerned her daughter was taken against her will, called this her “worst nightmare.”“We’re leaning on faith, on God and on each other, our family, our friends,” Ellen Spurlock said. “I miss her. It’s very, very hard on us. We just want her back where she belongs with us and her four babies.”She called her daughter “a very responsible individual” who “hardly ever went anywhere.”“Her kids were her priority,” Ellen Spurlock said. “So this is all just a big shock to her family and friends that she would not be here for over three weeks.”Ellen Spurlock said her message to her daughter is: “Please come home to your family and friends…Your babies need you.”Ellen Spurlock is also pleading with anyone with information to come forward.“No matter how insignificant you think it is, how minor, it could be the piece to the puzzle that brings Savannah back to us,” she said.Savannah Spurlock is described as having multiple tattoos including a rose on her left shoulder and text reading “I can do all things through Christ which strengthens me” on the right side of her torso.She was last seen wearing a black sleeveless top and a maroon skirt with heels.Anyone with information is asked to call the Richmond Police Department at 859-624-4776.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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ASOBAL (Round 11): Atletico Madrid and Barcelona with routine victories

first_imgRelated Items:ASOBAL, atletico, atletico madrid, Barcelona, madrid Click to comment ASOBAL 19/20 – Best saves of the season! ShareTweetShareShareEmail ShareTweetShareShareEmailCommentsBoth Atletico Madrid and Barcelona played their games yesterday of the 11th Round of the ASOBAL, and have scored routine victories. Despite just 13:12 after the first half, Atletico Madrid found way not to be threatened by Granollers in the second half, and won 30:26 in the end. Barcelona made another impressive victory when on road, now beating the home team Valladolid with huge 31:15. Barca celebrate new title with Joan Laporta Two formats for ASOBAL 2020/2021 Leave a Reply Cancel replyYour email address will not be published.Comment Name Email Website Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Recommended for youlast_img read more

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Study shows beneficial effects of blocking brain inflammation in an experimental model of Alzheimer’s

first_imgShare Email Share on Facebook Pinterest Share on Twittercenter_img A University of Southampton-led study has found that blocking a receptor in the brain responsible for regulating immune cells could protect against the memory and behaviour changes seen in the progression of Alzheimer’s disease.The research, published today in the journal Brain, was jointly funded by the MRC (Medical Research Council) and Alzheimer’s Research UK.It was originally thought that Alzheimer’s disease disturbs the brain’s immune response, but this latest study adds to evidence that inflammation in the brain can in fact drive the development of the disease. The findings suggest that by reducing this inflammation, progression of the disease could be halted. LinkedIn The team hope the discovery will lead to an effective new treatment for the disease, for which there is currently no cure.The researchers at the University of Southampton used tissue samples from healthy brains and those with Alzheimer’s, both of the same age. The researchers counted the numbers of a particular type of immune cell, known as microglia, in the samples and found that these were more numerous in the brains with Alzheimer’s disease. In addition, the activity of the molecules regulating the numbers of microglia correlated with the severity of the disease.The researchers then studied these same immune cells in mice which had been bred to develop features of Alzheimer’s. They wanted to find out whether blocking the receptor responsible for regulating microglia, known as CSF1R, could improve cognitive skills. They gave the mice oral doses of an inhibitor that blocks CSF1R and found that it could prevent the rise in microglia numbers seen in untreated mice as the disease progressed. In addition, the inhibitor prevented the loss of communication points between the nerve cells in the brain associated with Alzheimer’s, and the treated mice demonstrated fewer memory and behavioural problems compared with the untreated mice.Importantly, the team found the healthy number of microglia needed to maintain normal immune function in the brain was maintained, suggesting the blocking of CSF1R only reduces excess microglia.What the study did not find is a correlated reduction of the number of amyloid plaques in the brain, a characteristic feature of Alzheimer’s disease. This supports previous studies that argue other factors may play more of role in cognitive decline.Dr Diego Gomez-Nicola, lead author of the study and an MRC New Investigator Research Grant (NIRG) fellow at the University of Southampton, said: “These findings are as close to evidence as we can get to show that this particular pathway is active in the development of Alzheimer’s disease.“The next step is to work closely with our partners in industry to find a safe and suitable drug that can be tested to see if it works in humans.”Dr Rob Buckle, director of science programmes at the MRC, added: “It is increasingly clear that inflammation is a key player in a number of neurodegenerative conditions and this study is beginning to unravel the biological processes behind this link.“The study is an excellent example of how basic research can lead to promising partnerships with industry that could be of real benefit for those with dementia.”Dr Simon Ridley, Director of Research at Alzheimer’s Research UK, said: “This work, looking at the role of the immune system in Alzheimer’s disease, suggests that blocking the action of the CSF1R protein in mice could help limit the damaging effects of inflammation and protect against symptoms like memory loss. In the last few years, scientists in Southampton have been at the forefront of research into the role of the immune system in Alzheimer’s, so it is encouraging to see this study taking these ideas forward by identifying a specific mechanism that could be a target for future treatments.“Alzheimer’s Research UK is delighted to be supporting the next phase of this work as the researchers seek to build on these findings and develop drugs that could block the action of CSF1R in people. Research like this is vital as there are currently no treatments that can stop or slow the progression of Alzheimer’s in the brain. We desperately need to see greater investment in research, if we are to find new ways to help the tens of thousands of people who develop Alzheimer’s in this country every year.”Dr Gomez-Nicola and his colleagues at the University of Southampton will continue their work with funding from the Dementia Consortium – a collaboration between Alzheimer’s Research UK, MRC Technology and pharmaceutical companies, Eisai and Lilly.last_img read more

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News Scan for Mar 20, 2017

first_imgSaudi MOH: 2 new MERS cases, 3 deathsThe Saudi Arabian Ministry of Health (MOH) reported two new cases of MERS and three deaths in previously reported patients in recent days. Both of the new cases were linked to camel contact.A 63-year-old Saudi man from Badr was diagnosed as having MERS-CoV (Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus) infection on Mar 16. He is in stable condition, and had direct contact with camels. On the same day, the MOH said that a 67-year-old Riyadh man had passed away from the disease. He had preexisting disease.On Mar 17, the MOH said a 54-year-old Saudi man in Jeddah had died from MERS. Finally, on Mar 18 a 20-year-old expatriate man in Hafar Al Batin died from MERS after having direct contact with camels.So far Saudi Arabia has reported 1,580 MERS-CoV cases, 659 of them fatal, since the virus was first detected in humans in 2012. Ten people are still being treated for their infections, the MOH said.Mar 16 MOH report Mar 17 MOH report Mar 18 MOH report CDC reports 15 new drug-resistant Salmonella cases, ends investigationThe investigation into a multistate outbreak of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella Heidelberg infections tied to contact with dairy bull calves is now over after the pathogen sickened at least 36 people, hospitalizing 13, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said today.The update includes 15 new cases, including 5 hospitalizations, since the CDC first reported the outbreak on Nov 28, 2016. Illness-onset dates go back to Jan 27, 2015, with the latest being Jan 16 of this year. All but 8 of the patients, though, fell ill in June 2016 or later. Patients range in age from less than 1 year to 72 years, with a median of 18 years.Ten states reported cases, with Wisconsin (15), Missouri (6), Minnesota (4), and South Dakota (4) having the most. No deaths were reported.”This outbreak investigation is over,” the CDC said. “However, infections in calves continue to be reported and people can still get a Salmonella infection from contact with livestock.” The agency recommends washing hands thoroughly with soap and water immediately after contacting livestock or its surroundings, among other disease-prevention steps.Among all 36 outbreak patients, 25 (69%) reported contact with dairy bull calves or other cattle before becoming sick. Some of the patients said they fell ill after their dairy bull calves became sick or died. The outbreak strain was identified in one patient’s dairy calves.All isolates tested from patients proved to be MDR. All five isolates tested were resistant to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, ampicillin, cefoxitin, ceftriaxone, streptomycin, sulfisoxazole, and tetracycline and showed reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin. All, however, were susceptible to azithromycin, gentamicin, and meropenem. Four of the five isolates were also resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and two of these were resistant to chloramphenicol and nalidixic acid.Mar 20 CDC final update Nov 28, 2016, CIDRAP News scan on original notice PAHO reports 7,000 new chikungunya cases, mostly in BrazilThree weeks’ worth of new data from Brazil helped boost the chikungunya total in the Americas this year by 7,091 cases, the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) noted in an update late last week.The case count for 2017 has now reached 12,244, PAHO said in its Mar 17 update.Brazil, reporting new cases through late February, added 6,540 confirmed and suspected cases, raising its 2017 total to 10,294. Bolivia reported the next-highest increase as it noted its first 242 cases of the year. Nicaragua had 110 new cases and 317 total, while Paraguay reported 85 new infections, bringing its 2017 total to 508 cases.The outbreak began in late 2013 on the Caribbean island of St. Martin and has now sickened at least 2,399,237 people.Mar 17 PAHO update TB/HIV co-infections up 40% in Europe over past 5 yearsAccording to new data released today by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC), co-infection of tuberculosis (TB) and HIV has risen 40% in Europe over the past 5 years, despite overall decreases of TB cases. The news comes ahead of World TB Day, on Mar 24.The ECDC and the World Health Organization (WHO) said that new TB cases and deaths in the 53 countries of the WHO European Region declined each year by 4.3% and 8.5%, respectively, from 2011 through 2015, but that trend was not reflected in at-risk populations. Among drug users, HIV-positive people, and the homeless, TB rates increased during the same period.”The flare-up of TB/HIV co-infections from 2011 to 2015, together with persistently high rates of drug-resistant tuberculosis, seriously threaten progress made towards ending TB, the goal that European and world leaders have committed to achieve by 2030,” says Zsuzsanna Jakab, MD, WHO regional director for Europe, in a press release.TB is a leading killer of those with HIV/AIDs. In 2015, there were 2 million cases of HIV in Europe. According to the WHO, people with HIV are seven times more likely to fail treatment for TB or perish from either disease. Mar 20 ECDC/WHO statement Mar 20 ECDC World TB Day release Study: Following up on negative urine cultures aids antibiotic stewardshipBetter follow-up of negative urine cultures substantially reduced the number of antibiotic days among pediatric urgent care patients, according to a new study in Pediatrics. The authors say the findings highlight empiric antibiotic treatment of urinary tract infection (UTI) in children as an important target for antibiotic stewardship.For the study, researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital (NCH)—an academic children’s hospital in Columbus, Ohio, with a network of urgent care centers—set out to develop and implement a protocol for follow-up management on negative urine culture results. The purpose was to reduce inappropriate antibiotic exposure in patients with acute UTI at their urgent care centers. UTI is a common infection in children, but because physicians have to wait up to 48 hours for urine culture results, they frequently prescribe empiric antibiotic therapy based on symptoms. Prior to the study, NCH had no consistent mechanism in place to follow up on negative culture results and discontinue unnecessary antibiotic therapy.The protocol standardized a process in which a nurse reviews the urine culture result and forwards a negative result to a physician, who then decides if antibiotic discontinuation is appropriate based on the results and clinical presentation. The nurse then notifies the patient or caregiver of the recommendation, and the physician documents the discontinuation of the antibiotics in the electronic medical record.During the study period (July 2013 through December 2015), 910 patients received empiric antibiotic therapy for UTIs but had negative urine culture results. Among these patients, the rate of documented antibiotic discontinuation following a negative urine culture rose from a baseline mean of 4% to a mean of 84%, avoiding 3,429 (40%) of 8,648 antibiotic days prescribed. In addition, of the 46 patients who returned to an NCH urgent care center after antibiotic discontinuation, none were subsequently diagnosed as having a UTI.”Our results highlight an essential opportunity in outpatient settings to introduce quality and stewardship measures for UTI management that will affect many patients and avoid a substantial number of antibiotic days,” the authors write. Mar 16 Pediatrics study New AMR diagnostic tool outperforms competitors in analysisA new diagnostic tool that identifies antimicrobial resistance (AMR) genes directly from paired sequencing reads outperformed other diagnostic tools in a new study in bioRxiv, a preprint server.The tool, called ARIBA (Antimicrobial Resistance Identification by Assembly), uses a combined mapping/alignment and targeted local assembly approach to identify AMR genes and their variants efficiently and accurately from paired sequencing reads. This approach is considered less limited than other widely used diagnostic tools that either align sequencing reads to a set of reference genes or search for reference gene matches in de novo assembled sequences.In head-to-head comparisons with the diagnostic tools SRST2 and KmerResistance, ARIBA was found to be just as accurate in identifying resistance genes in Enterococcus faecium and Shigella sonnei but was also able to identify and classify variants involved in AMR. In addition, it was able to report the presence of variants, and interpret their consequences, in Neisseria gonorrhea isolates. ARIBA was also faster and required fewer computational resources.ARIBA was developed by researchers from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute. Mar 18 bioRxiv abstractlast_img read more

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Siemens rotor flies with Volga-Dnepr

first_imgThe ELC team first conducted an engineering study to confirm that it was technically possible to carry the oversized cargo onboard one of Volga-Dnepr’s AN-124-100 freighter aircraft.This included assessing and approving the specially-designed transport skid, which the rotor would be mounted onto in order to facilitate the loading and offloading process, and ensure the cargo’s safe delivery.Once this was ensured, Volga-Dnepr managed the transportation of the rotor from its manufacturing plant in Muelheim, Germany to Leipzig/Halle Airport, taking care of all trucking arrangements including obtaining special permits.At the departure airport, Volga-Dnepr was responsible for all essential procedures prior to the loading, which included terminal cargo handling and Customs services. In both Mumbai and Leipzig, members of the ELC team organised mobile cranes for loading and offloading the cargo.The charter flight to India was contracted under the Ruslan International AN-124 joint venture.  www.volga-dnepr.comwww.siemens.comwww.ruslanint.comlast_img read more

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20 Prominent Dominicans to be recognized in 2018 meritorious service honors

first_imgLocalNews 20 Prominent Dominicans to be recognized in 2018 meritorious service honors by: – November 2, 2018 Sharing is caring! Share Tweet Sharecenter_img Share Twenty long serving Dominicans will be awarded at the November 3rd Parade of Uniformed Groups marking Dominica’s 40th year of Independence.Meritorious Service Honors will be bestowed on these individuals and one business in recognition of their outstanding contribution to public life.Dominica’s Highest Award, the Dominica Award of Honour, will be bestowed on Dr. Lennox Honychurch.The Second Highest Award, the Sisserou Award of Honour, will be bestowed on Hubert J. Charles, Valantine Poponne, Frances E. Delsol, Kelly B. Graneau, Rev. Fr Charles Martin.The third highest honour, the Meritorious Service Award, will be conferred on Curtis F. Matthew, Emanuel Loblack, Cleve F. Tavernier ,Job Joseph, Parry Roy Bellot, Clement Joseph Harve, Jacinta Bannis, L’Express Des Isles, Gerard Cools-Lartigue, and Leroy ‘Wadix’ Charles.The Long Services Medal of Honour will be awarded to Ronald F. Charles, Jones Joan Anastasie Aaron, Melanie Francois, Rosamund Ismael, and Barbara Tonge.The Parade of Uniformed Groups and award ceremony will commence at 5.00 p.m. at the Windsor Park Sports Stadium. 778 Views   no discussionslast_img read more

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Argonauts Extinguish the Flames in Five

first_img Full Schedule Roster at Shorter 10/26/2019 – 12:00 PM Live Stats Next Game: October 25, 2019Lee VolleyballShorter VolleyballPENSACOLA, Fla. – The Argos continues their GSC undefeated streak this season in a nail-biter against the Lee Flames. UWF came out on top in a five set match against Lee tonight as they alternated the wins. Tomorrow the Argos will play the Hawks in Rome, Ga. at 12:00 PM.With their win tonight in decisions of 25-18, 29-27, 25-19, 25-23, 15-6, as the Argos won the first, third and fifth, UWF improves to 16-8 overall and 8-0 in the GSC while Lee moves to 9-15 overall and 2-7 in the GSC after today’s loss.Tonight West Florida was lead by three Argos who were a consistent offensive threat to the Flames. Freshman Veresia Yon lead the team in kills with 18 hitting .371 followed by Jordyn Poppen with 17 kills and then close behind her was Sadie Hough with 15 kills. UWF’s passing and defensive game was unstoppable as the team racked up 94 digs and was lead by Kierra Potts who had 24 of the 94 digs. Two Argos earned double-doubles including Jordyn Poppen with her 17 kills and 17 digs and Brogan Wallin with 27 assists and 11 digs. The Hawks will come into tomorrow’s match 7-16 overall and 0-8 in the GSC. The last time the two teams played each other, the Argos won in three on October 16, 2018 in Pensacola. The match against the Hawks will start at 12:00 PM CT in Rome, Ga. at the Winthrop-King Centre.The matches will be live streamed accompanied by live stats provided by the host schools for those wanting to watch and that information can be found at goargos.com.How to Follow the Argos: For complete information on UWF Volleyball, follow the team on Twitter at @UWFVolleyball and on Instagram at @UWFVolleyball.Print Friendly Versionlast_img read more

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Noguchi blows away 10,000 field

first_img IN FIVE EASY PIECES WITH TAKE 5 NARUTO, Tokushima Pref. – Olympic marathon champion Mizuki Noguchi cruised to victory Friday in the women’s 10,000 meters in her first competitive race since winning the gold in Athens last summer. Noguchi clocked 31 minutes, 44.29 seconds at the Kansai track and field championships for corporate clubs, more than one minute clear of the rest of the field. GET THE BEST OF THE JAPAN TIMESlast_img

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