Vermont Software Developers’ Alliance changes name to Vermont Technology Alliance

first_imgVermont Technology Alliance (vtTA) to better reflect the organizationâ s expanding membership and its mission to represent and support the stateâ s growing number of technology companies that are creating high-skilled, high-paying jobs. VtTA companies represent one of the strongest sectors of the Vermont economy. They have been adding jobs ‘even during the economic downturn ‘that earn higher than average Vermont salaries. For example, vtTA members Dealer.com added 250 jobs in 2011, Technical Connection placed 200 people in tech jobs in 2011, and MyWebGrocer added 63 employees in the last six months. The Vermont Software Developers’Alliance was formed in 2004 by entrepreneurs to foster a strong and growing software industry in Vermont, with a focus on common business interests and programs where members can share ideas, expertise and strategies for success.  As the organization has grown, Vermont companies in other technology business segments have identified common needs and have joined or expressed interest in joining the Alliance. The name change reflects this expanded role and that the organization welcomes all Vermont technology companies as members.  â VtTA is dedicated to helping and promoting Vermontâ s technology industry, creating technology jobs in the state, and advocating policies that strengthen Vermont technology companies,’said John Canning, president of the board.  â Some think of Vermont only in terms of farming, skiing or maple syrup and are surprised to learn it also is home to cutting-edge software and technology companies that are creating innovative products and high-paying jobs. We want this important segment of the Vermont economy to be recognized, celebrated and supported.â  The Alliance recently published the second edition of â Tapping Tech 2.0,’which highlights the positive impact of Vermont technology companies on the stateâ s economy, including these facts:·         The average wage for a software company job in Vermont is $65,000 ‘25% higher than the Vermont median household income $51,841 (2010 U.S. Census).·         The estimated revenue generated in Vermont by vtTA members in 2011 was $280 million ‘representing an 87% increase in just two years.·         For every software developer hired, technology companies typically add an additional six non-technical support positions. To continue to deliver these results, vtTA has identified three key needs: 1) educated employees with strong foundations in science, math and technology who can fill current and future job openings; 2) continued investment in high-speed Internet broadband connectivity throughout the state as well as traditional infrastructure that enables tech companies to operate and stay in Vermont; and 3) improved access to financing to help Vermontâ s knowledge-based businesses get started and expand. In addition to promoting tech-friendly public policy initiatives, the vtTA sponsors a number of programs and offerings in support of its mission, including: Lunch and Learn ‘Monthly information sessions for Vermont technology companies and employees on a range of topics, from company profiles to public policy initiatives to business advice and education. Vermont Tech Jam ‘The Alliance is a founder of and participant in the Vermont Tech Jam ‘an annual fall conference and exhibition that showcases more than 70 Vermont technology and bioscience companies, and promotes technology careers and education. Tapping Tech ‘VtTA has produced the second edition of, â Tapping Tech’a 36-page, full color publication that highlights the positive impact of Vermontâ s growing technology businesses. Bentley Award ‘The alliance has created The Bentley Award, which offers cash, Apple iPads and technical expertise in support of specific projects focused on science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics (STEAM) in Vermont K-12 schools. The awards honor the life of the late Bentley Seifer, who was the 12-year-old son of Julie A. Davis and Bruce Seifer, a founding member of the Alliance.  The Vermont Technology Alliance is welcoming new company and individual members to join the organization.  Details and the membership form are available at VtTA.org.About the vtTA The Vermont Technology alliance supports and promotes Vermontâ s thriving software and technical business community. VtTA helps its members share ideas, expertise, and strategies for success and works with business, government and higher education to advocate for policies and programs that strengthen Vermontâ s technology-based economy.More information about the Vermont Technology Alliance can be found at: ·         vtTA.org·         facebook.com/VermontTechAlliance·         twitter.com/VermontTechAlliance·         linkedin/VermontTechAlliance May 17, 2012 âlast_img read more

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Angelo Blackson feels ‘overlooked’ during Auburn career

first_imgINDIANAPOLIS – In a field of 55 defensive linemen invited to the NFL Combine, Angelo Blackson has his work cut out for him.The former Auburn defensive tackle is trying to impress and change perceptions of him – Blackson is currently projected to go undrafted by NFLDraftScout.com.“I got a chip on my shoulder,” said Blackson, who had 17 tackles with 5 1/2 for loss, including three sacks, and six hurries last season. “I feel like I’ve been overlooked during my collegiate career. I want to leave an impression, I want to stand out.”Blackson has been up working at 4 a.m. this week, preparing for the biggest job interview of his life.“I just want to get my name recognized,” he said. “I want to leave a great impression on these scouts. I want to leave an everlasting impression on guys during interviews, my character.”Checking it at 6-foot-4 and 318 pounds, Blackson’s goal of a 4.9 40-yard dash would be quite good for a defensive tackle of his size. He’s also aiming for 30 bench press reps, also very good for a defensive tackle.Though he was in and out of the starting lineup the last two years, Blackson said he wasn’t bothered by his playing time.“I was one of them guys who was going to take care of my business, take care of my responsibilities,” he said. “If the starting lineup changed up next week, that’s what it is. I’m still going to go out there and work.”Blackson compares himself to Buffalo Bills defensive tackle Kyle Williams, who has been a reliable presence during his nine-year NFL career.“Biggest thing about him is he takes his responsibility,” Blackson said. “When a play comes in his gap he makes the play, because it’s in his gap.”With special teams so important to the success of rookies, Blackson’s numerous blocked field goals can only help his prospects and he’ll play three technique, as he did in college, or zero in a 3-4.“Whatever they want me to do,” Blackson said. “If it’s going to give me a jump start I’m willing to do it.”last_img read more

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Bristol City named South West Checkatrade Community Club of the Year

first_imgIt is the second year in a row the club has won the accolade, for the exceptional work of the Bristol City Community Trust.The club will be joined alongside five other regional winners at the House of Commons this Monday (March 4th) to receive their awards with EFL Interim Chair Debbie Jevans, EFL Chief Executive Officer Shaun Harvey and host Hayley McQueen all confirmed to attend.The Robins will then be put forward alongside the five other regional winners for the 2019 Checkatrade Community Club of the Year Award, which will be announced at the EFL Awards on Sunday 7 April in central London.Bristol City’s education and employability projects and outcomes impressed the judges this year. The environment created for learning and the commitment of the team to support students beyond their learning experience proved a standout to the panel. The ongoing work of their Youth Council also continues to impress and highlights the importance and potential of young people in our communities.Bristol City Community Trust Chief Executive Officer, Dan White said: “The team work hard every day to positively affect the lives of young people in Bristol and to get recognition of this is a proud moment for us all.“This year’s showcase project focused on our life changing Education programme which empowers young people to develop themselves personally, academically and socially in a unique environment based at Ashton Gate Stadium.”Chief Executive Officer of Bristol City Football Club, Mark Ashton said: “It is a great honour to win the South West Community Club of the year. The fact that we are winning this award for the second year running is a testament to the continued great work that the community team does.”The EFL received strong submissions from a wide range of clubs with the panel marking the applications on the range of projects delivered, their social impact and their showcase projects.EFL Chief Executive, Shaun Harvey, said: “Football Clubs play such an important part in communities up and down the country so it is essential we recognise their fantastic work.“This is the third time we have held the Parliamentary event to recognise the Checkatrade Community Club of the Year regional winners and I am once again hugely impressed by the dedication and commitment shown by our Clubs in tackling some of the most challenging issues in society.“They play an important role in dealing with issues such as homelessness, reducing crime and improving health and education. This life-changing work can make a significant difference to some of our most vulnerable people and is testament to the power of football as a force for good.”The six regional winners were selected by an independent judging panel including, The Times’ Chief Football Writer, Henry Winter; Clive Efford MP; Director of Corporate Social Responsibility at The PFA John Hudson; The Daily Mail’s Laura Lambert and the EFL Trust Director of Operations, Mike Evans.For more information regarding the 2019 EFL Awards, visit: www.efl.com.last_img read more

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