Villegas out of Olympics as he tries to keep Tour card

first_imgTROON, Scotland – Camilo Villegas of Colombia pulled out of the Olympics on Monday because he is trying to keep his job on the PGA Tour. Villegas had indicated for the last two weeks that he wanted to be in Rio for golf’s return to the Olympics for the first time since 1904. While he considered the Zika virus – Villegas and his wife are trying to start a family – his main concern was work. Having pulled out the Barbasol Championship last week with a thumb injury, he is No. 146 in the FedEx Cup standings. Only the top 125 advance to the playoffs and keep full cards for the following season, and Villegas has only four tournaments left. He is playing the RBC Canadian Open this week. ”This is an incredibly difficult decision for me, but ultimately I have to do what’s best for my career,” Villegas said. He is the 21st male golfer to withdraw from the Olympics, and he joins Brendon de Jonge of Zimbabwe in citing his job security for pulling out. ”Right now, I have not secured my PGA Tour card for next season and I have several opportunities to improve my FedEx Cup standing, one of which overlaps with the Olympics,” he said. ”I have waited until the last minute to withdraw as I have been working hard to secure my playing privileges so I can continue to represent Colombia on the PGA Tour.” By withdrawing, Colombia will not have a male golfer in the Olympics next month. Villegas would be replaced by Jose-Felipe Lima of Portugal, which now will have two players in the 60-man field. The 21 players who have pulled out include the top four in the world – Jason Day, Dustin Johnson, Jordan Spieth and Rory McIlroy. The Olympics at least will have two of the major champions from this year in Masters winner Danny Willett of England and British Open champion Henrik Stenson of Sweden.last_img read more

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Levy remains out front at shortened European Open

first_imgBAD GRIESBACH, Germany – French golfer Alexander Levy took a four-shot lead going into the third and final round of the European Open after the event was shortened to 54 holes on Saturday. Morning fog delayed the start of play again for the third day, forcing organizers to cut the event to three rounds. Levy, who was at 17 under when play was halted on Friday evening, completed the final hole of his second round with a par on the ninth. Eight birdies earlier gave him a flawless 63 to stay 17 under after his course-record opening 62. Michael Jonzon of Sweden also carded a 63 to move to second at 13 under, one shot ahead of Ross Fisher of England, who carded 65-65. Bernd Wiesberger of Austria posted a 68 to drop into a tie for fourth with GermansFlorian Fritsch and Martin Kaymer, all at 11 under. Levy finished in a tie for seventh at last week’s Italian Open, and is seeking his third European Tour title and first since the 2014 Portugal Masters.last_img read more

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I.K. Kim wins first LPGA event in six years in China

first_imgBEIJING – In-Kyung Kim won the Reignwood LPGA Classic on Sunday for her first LPGA victory in six years, making an eagle and a birdie on the two late par 5s to lead a South Korean sweep of the top three places. The 28-year-old Kim shot a 7-under 66 at Reignwood Pine Valley, holing a 25-foot eagle putt on the 16th and a 12-footer for birdie on the 18th for her fourth tour title and first since the 2010 Lorena Ochoa Invitational in Mexico. She also won a Ladies European Tour event last month in Germany. Kim finished at 24-under 268, a stroke ahead of third-round leader Mi Jung Hur and 2014 winner Mirim Lee in the Asian Swing opener. Playing a group behind Kim in the final threesome, Hur missed a chance to force a playoff when her eagle chip from the back fringe went a foot right. ”I just wanted to play my game. I can’t control anyone else’s game,” Kim said. ”I feel good that I was able to play how I wanted to play. Even the result, I really try not to focus on result so much. Then I wouldn’t be able to perform the way I wanted. I chose to play my game and kind of paid off.” Kim made up for a bogey on par-5 ninth – she went for the green in two and ended up short in the water – by playing the other four par 5s in 5 under. She made the eagle on 16 and birdied Nos. 6, 12 and 18. She also birdied the par-4 15th in her late run. Full-field scores for the Reignwood LPGA Classic ”Fifteen was really big, too,” Kim noted when asked about the eagle on 16. The 5-foot-3 player was aggressive on 16 after considering laying up. ”I wasn’t sure go for it or not go for it,” Kim said. ”I felt like today I really played with everything I got. I didn’t really pull back. Even No. 9, I felt was the right club. I think I managed. I played aggressively, which I had to on this golf course. And especially back nine, I knew that everybody was going to score, so I wanted to do the same thing.” Hur birdied five of the last six for a 70 in the round delayed 1 1/2 hours at the start because of rain and lightning. She opened bogey-bogey-birdie-bogey and parred the next eight. Lee had a 68. She had a double bogey on No. 9, then played the back nine in 6-under 31 with an eagle on the 12th and five birdies. China’s Shanshan Feng, the 2013 winner in the event that wasn’t played last year, shot a 69 to tie for fourth with Canada’s Brooke Henderson (71) at 21 under. The 19-year-old Henderson, a two-time winner this year, plans to play all six weeks in Asia, a journey that will take her to Taiwan and South Korea the next two weeks, back to China for the Blue Bay LPGA at Hainan Island, and then to Malaysia and Japan. Second-ranked Ariya Jutanugarn shot a 65 to tie for sixth at 18 under and take the lead from the idle Lydia Ko in the player of the year points race. The tour leader with five victories, Jutanugarn had a double bogey on the par-5 sixth, then birdied eight of the last 12 holes – with birdies on the final four par 5s. The Thai player also had a double bogey on a par 5 in a second-round 75 that took her out of contention. Kim is the sixth South Korean winner this season and the third-oldest winner behind Anna Nordqvist (29) and Brittany Lang (30). Kim earned $310,000 to push her season total to $573,534 and is projected to jump from 42nd to 29th in the world ranking.last_img read more

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Lots of drama, surprises at LPGA finale

first_imgNAPLES, Fla. – The drama unfolded in layers in a breakthrough Sunday at the CME Group Tour Championship. Charley Hull won her first LPGA title. Ariya Jutanugarn won her first Rolex Player of the Year Award and her first CME Globe $1 million jackpot. In Gee Chun joined Nancy Lopez as the only players to win the Louise Suggs Rolex Rookie of the Year Award and Vare Trophy for low scoring average in the same season. This day of plenty – with so many big prizes handed out – totaled up to one large upset, though. Rolex world No. 1 Lydia Ko left without any of the important season-long prizes that were up for grabs. With her brilliant tournament-record 62 Friday, Ko shot to the top of the leaderboard, opening the possibility she could sweep all the prizes Sunday, but it wasn’t meant to be. Ko’s hopes were down to the Vare Trophy late in the final round, but even that was dashed at the very end. Ko’s scoring average was .001 ahead of Chun until Ko missed a 15-foot birdie chance at the 72nd hole and Chun followed by holing a 9-foot birdie putt. “It may hurt right now about what happened, but I still feel like it’s been an awesome season,” said Ko, who won five times around the world and maintained her grip on the Rolex world No. 1 ranking from year’s start to finish. “Just so many highs.” CME Group Tour Championship: Articles, photos and videos Ko could have been speaking for all the winners at Tiburon Golf Club. The day belonged to Hull, but ultimately the season belonged to Jutanugarn. Hull, the 20-year-old from England, closed with a bogey-free 6-under-par 66, claiming her first LPGA title in her 52nd tour start. At 19-under 269, Hull beat So Yeon Ryu (67) by two shots, securing the victory after Ryu’s approach at the 71st hole thumped to a stop at the base of a 4-foot bunker wall, leading to a bogey. “Feels great to be a winner on the LPGA tour,” Hull said. “It’s wicked to do it at 20.” Jutanugarn, who is also just 20 years old, closed with a 69 and tied for fourth. That was more than good enough to hold off Ko for the CME Globe $1 million jackpot, the Rolex Player of the Year Award and the LPGA money-winning title. Ko, who had to win Sunday to take Player of the Year from Jutanugarn, shot 72 and tied for 10th. Jutanugarn said she would enjoy spending some of the $1 million she won with her family at Disney World next week, but the Rolex Player of the Year Award is the prize she craved most. “My dream come true,” Jutanugarn said. “I never think my name can be on this trophy, and, right now, I’m really proud of myself.” Jutanugarn fashioned a remarkable comeback this season with a tour-best five LPGA victories. As a teen phenom in Thailand, Jutanugarn was labeled a can’t miss star, but she tore up her shoulder in a fall chasing her sister off a tee box at the LPGA Championship in the summer of 2013. She missed eight months healing from shoulder surgery and then struggled in her return. She missed 10 consecutive cuts last year, and just when she looked as if she might be on the rise again this spring, she blew a three-shot lead coming home in the final round of the ANA Inspiration. Jutanugarn’s five titles included her first major, the Ricoh Women’s British Open in July. “Even like last year, when I miss 10 cuts in a row, I really appreciate it,” Jutanugarn said. “Because if that not happen, I’m not going to win all this stuff this year.” Jutanugarn was named the winner of this year’s LPGA’s Heather Farr Award for perseverance. Chun closed hard Sunday to overtake Ko for the Vare Trophy, finishing with three consecutive birdies. The battle was so close, Ko walked to the 18th hole with a scoring average that was .001 better than Chun’s. Chun, 22, who won the Evian Championship in September to join Se Ri Pak as the only players to claim majors as their first two LPGA titles, suspected her last putt might be to win the Vare Trophy. “It was pressure for me, but I just try to enjoy my last putt,” Chun said. “Just amazing.” Ko, still 19, was gracious as ever in the end. She hugged and congratulated Chun, then sought out Jutanugarn, hugging Ariya and her sister, Moriya, and their mother, Narumon. “It’s been a really fun season, but Ariya played better,” Ko said. “When you play good and somebody plays better, you can’t do much about it. I think there are so many positives. I know that even though I’m not the one holding the trophy, Ariya is such a deserving winner, both of the Player of the Year and the Globe.”last_img read more

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Pushed by wife, Pan surges to first win at Heritage

first_imgHILTON HEAD ISLAND, S.C. – C.T. Pan watched the Masters last week with his wife, and sometimes caddie, Yingchun Lin, thrilled by Tiger Woods’ stirring victory at Augusta National. His wife, Pan recalled, told him point blank, ”Hey, I’m not patient, so you better get me (to Augusta) as soon as possible.” Pan complied quickly, taking advantage of top-ranked Dustin Johnson’s back-nine meltdown Sunday to win the RBC Heritage for his first PGA Tour victory. Along with $1.242 million, the win opens a world of opportunities for the 27-year-old Taiwanese player: He’s exempt on tour through 2020-21, in line to make the Presidents Cup International team this year and will have an opportunity he’s dreamed about since taking up the game in the mid-1990s by playing at Augusta National. ”It’s a good problem to have,” Pan said. Pan shot a 4-under 67 to finish at 12-under 272, a stroke ahead of Matt Kuchar and two in front of Patrick Cantlay, Scott Piercy and Shane Lowry. Kuchar had a 67, Cantlay and Piercy had 69s and Lowry a 70. The top-ranked Johnson, the third-round leader in his home-state event, had a 77 to tie for 28th at 4 under. He played a five-hole stretch in 7 over, making bogeys on Nos. 11-13 and double bogeys on Nos. 14-15. Pan took the lead for good with a 9-foot birdie putt on the par-4 16th. Pan headed to the practice range after the round to keep ready in case of a playoff, then raised his arms in triumph when told he’d won. ”It’s still really hard for me to believe,” he said. ”I’m processing. My phone has been vibrating the last 10 minutes. I’m so happy I finally got it done.” Pan won twice on the PGA Tour Canada in 2015 when he turned professional. He’s finished second twice in PGA Tour events, once at the Farmers Insurance Open in 2017 and last year at the Wyndham Championship. Full-field scores from the RBC Heritage RBC Heritage: Articles, photos and videos Johnson, the 20-time PGA Tour champ, carried a one-shot lead into the final round and the South Carolina native seemed a strong bet to add the Palmetto State’s only tour stop to his trophy case. But Johnson never found a rhythm early and lost all hope with his uncharacteristic drop off. He had a birdie on the fifth to stay on top but then his collapse started mildly with a bogey on the par-3 seventh hole. It took full flight on the back nine. Johnson’s frustrations were on full display on the par-4 13th when his approach went into the bunker, a foot or so from the wooden-board facing. He barely got it out, shook his head and tossed his wedge down against his bag. He flew his tee shot into the water on the par-3 14th to drop two more shots. Johnson added a second double bogey on the par-5 15th, a hole he had birdied the first three rounds. Johnson waved to the stands on the 18th when he closed with a birdie. Lowry, who had three bogeys over his final six holes Saturday to lose a lead he held much of the week, appeared to regain his earlier form with birdies on the second, fifth and sixth holes to take a two-shot lead. But a bogey on the straightforward, par-4 ninth – Lowry had birdied it two of the first three rounds – dropped him back. He stubbed a pair of chips on the 12th hole en route to a double bogey. Lowry scratched back within a shot of Pan with a birdie on the 14th, but could come no closer. He said he’ll take positives from the week. ”Look, after coming so close, it’s hard to describe what it’s like,” Lowry said ”But I’m sure I’ll get over it and move on to next week.” Kuchar, the 2014 winner at Harbour Town, put together a charge of five birdies to tie Pan at the top. But a bogey on the par-3 17th following a tee shot into the bunker ruined his chances of a second tartan jacket. ”It was so much fun,” Kuchar said. ”Getting in the mix on the back nine here on Sunday. That back nine, I was really, really enjoying myself.” Cantlay looked good for a second straight weekend – he went 64-68 his final two rounds at the Masters to tie for ninth – but his chip from just off the green on the 18th for a tying birdie did not come close and he settled for a final-round 69. ”I hit a lot of solid shots and (it) just wasn’t enough,” he said. Pan’s wife was key to his playing here this week. He had planned to attend a junior event in Houston he helped organize. But Yingchun Lin told him to get back to work and let her handle things down there. ”Just listen to your wife,” Pan said. ”And you will have a good life. She’s right, always.”last_img read more

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Mickelson and family moving to South Florida

first_imgLA QUINTA, Calif. – Phil Mickelson was born in San Diego, lives in Rancho Santa Fe, Calif., and has won 12 of his 44 PGA Tour titles in California, but his days living on the West Coast appear to be nearing an end. Mickelson confirmed to GolfChannel.com Wednesday at The American Express that his family closed on a lot on Jupiter Island, Fla., on Dec. 23 and he hopes to begin construction soon. Mickelson, who is the host of this week’s event, said the family’s current plan is to move to Florida after his youngest child, Evan, graduates from high school in a year and a half. Lefty would join a growing list of Tour players who call South Florida home including Tiger Woods, world No. 1 Brooks Koepka and Dustin Johnson. The American Express: Full-field tee times | Full coverage Although Mickelson didn’t offer a reason for his potential move, in 2013 he suggested he might move out of California because of his federal and state tax bill, which he estimated had pushed his tax rate above 60 percent. “There are going to be some drastic changes for me because I happen to be in that zone that has been targeted both federally and by the state and, you know, it doesn’t work for me right now,” he said in 2013. “So I’m going to have to make some changes.” A week later Mickelson released a statement saying, “finances and taxes are a personal matter, and I should not have made my opinions on them public.” There is no state income tax in Florida.last_img read more

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Q&Gray: Rickie’s back at Honda; will Tommy win?

first_imgThe PGA Tour scene has shifted east, and some of the game’s biggest stars are set to tackle a difficult test at the Honda Classic. Here are four burning questions to consider before the action begins at PGA National, ranging from a recent Ryder Cup star to the fates of three of the reigning major champions: Is it time for Tommy Fleetwood to end his PGA Tour drought? Ample time is spent around bars and water coolers alike debating who might be the best player without a major. But there’s no debate about who is the best player in the world without a PGA Tour win. That distinction belongs to Tommy Fleetwood, who enters the Honda ranked No. 12 in the world. He’s the only player in the top 20 missing one, as Bernd Wiesberger (No. 23) is the next highest-ranked player without a Tour title to his name. Fleetwood has won five times on the European Tour, most recently in November, and his four runner-up finishes on the PGA Tour include the 2018 U.S. Open and 2019 Open. But he has yet to get into the winner’s circle in the U.S. despite making 63 career starts.  There’s reason to suspect that start No. 64 might be when he ends his drought, as Fleetwood is listed as a betting co-favorite this week alongside Brooks Koepka. Fleetwood finished fourth in 2018 in his lone prior appearance at PGA National, a track that rewards solid iron play which remains one of the Englishman’s strengths. Fleetwood closed 2019 with a fury and hasn’t lost a step since, following a runner-up in Abu Dhabi with top-20s in Dubai and Mexico. Golf Central Koepka, Fleetwood co-favorites at Honda BY Will Gray  — February 25, 2020 at 12:09 PM Brooks Koepka and Tommy Fleetwood have been installed as betting co-favorites for this week’s Honda Classic. Will the Honda crown another first-time winner? Last year Keith Mitchell drew some motivation out of a local headline touting “relative unknowns” leading the tournament at the halfway point en route to a breakthrough victory. But there’s no denying that PGA National has a tendency to crown first-time winners.  In the 13 years since the event shifted to PGA National, four players have made this their first career win – including Y.E. Yang, who won here in 2009 months before toppling Tiger Woods at Hazeltine. Perhaps it’s the penal rough, or perhaps it’s the treacherous nature of the Bear Trap, but there’s an element in play that allows for first-timers to contend and even overtake more accomplished peers. Honda Classic: Full-field tee times | Full coverage While the aforementioned Fleetwood doesn’t exactly fit the mold of a Mitchell or 2013 champ Michael Thompson, there are still several players in the field who could surprise and potentially leave with the trophy. Among them are South Africa’s Erik Van Rooyen, who tied for third last week in Mexico City and is making just his 11th career PGA Tour start this week, and Wyndham Clark. Clark held the 54-hole lead here last year before fading to a T-7 finish, but he returns to PGA National on the heels of two top-20 finishes earlier this month in California. Mitchell’s Honda victory proved that he could ‘handle the stage’ Can any of the major champions build momentum? While Woods is notably absent from an event held just a few miles from his Florida home, the Honda does feature each of the other three major champions from 2019: Koepka, Gary Woodland and Shane Lowry. And they’re each hoping to use this week’s stop as a springboard with the first major of 2020 just a few weeks away. Koepka is deserving of favorite status, the lone top-10 player in the field and a runner-up last year after a sizzling 66 in the final round. But after middling finishes to start the year and an injury layoff before that, he’s now down to No. 3 in the world – rarified air, but still his worst standing since March. Woodland was a runner-up here back in 2017 and already has three top-10 finishes to his credit this season, but he hasn’t factored down the stretch since holding off Koepka at Pebble Beach. Perhaps the champion most in search of a spark is Lowry, whose lone top-10 finish since Portrush came at the Hong Kong Open in January. Top-10 finish for Rickie at Honda? Tripp thinks so Will an unconventional schedule pay off for Rickie Fowler? Fowler wasn’t a part of the star-studded field two weeks ago at Riviera, and he opted to skip the first WGC event of the year last week in Mexico. It was an unconventional choice from a veteran who made four starts in January but didn’t get closer than four shots of the leader in any of them. But this is Fowler’s time to shine, as the 2017 Honda champ returns to a course where he was also a runner-up a year ago and T-6 in 2016. This also kicks off a key three-week stretch for Fowler, who is a staple in the Bay Hill field and then will turn his attention to TPC Sawgrass, the site of the biggest win of his career back in 2015. While each star has the liberty to craft his own itinerary leading into the first major of the year, Fowler has certainly trod a unique path. An attempt to shake things up by playing in Palm Springs didn’t exactly pay immediate dividends, but now he’ll have a chance to shine with plenty of rest and on a course where he’s historically had great success. Down to 25th in the latest world rankings, a high finish could go a long way toward getting him back into the upper echelon of the game where he has spent much of the past few years.last_img read more

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Who rose and fell in the FedExCup standings?

first_imgIn this season unlike any other, there were bound to be some players who were helped by the 13-week work stoppage – and others who were hurt by it. Of course, there were myriad factors to consider. How much did they practice during the pandemic shutdown? Did they suffer an injury or struggle without their coach? Did they play enough during the restart? Were they affected by the fan-less atmosphere? Now that the FedExCup top 30 are set to gather for the Tour Championship, we delved into the numbers to find the biggest risers and fallers from when the sport shut down (following the Players Championship) to the season finale. BIGGEST RISERS OVERALL Michael Thompson: 132 spots (from No. 191 to No. 59) Jim Herman: 125 (No. 189 to No. 64) Justin Rose: 114 (No. 205 to No. 91) Dustin Johnson: 110 (No. 111 to No. 1) Brooks Koepka: 109 (No. 213 to No. 104) Notes: Thompson had only one top-20 prior to his 3M victory, while Herman hadn’t been better than 35th in a full-field event prior to his 124 weekend at the Wyndham. … Rose uncharacteristically struggled this season (more missed cuts than made) while Johnson and Koepka had gotten off to quiet starts and were still recovering from Fall 2019 surgeries. BIGGEST FALLERS OVERALL Scott Brown: 44 spots (from No. 70 to No. 114) Nate Lashley: 44 (No. 52 to No. 96) Zac Blair: 42 (No. 71 to No. 113) Brian Gay: 42 (No. 73 to No. 115) Vaughn Taylor: 42 (No. 43 to No. 85) Notes: Brown’s best finish during the restart was a 42nd-place showing, while Lashley had four straight missed cuts and a withdrawal before a restart-best 37th at the PGA. Tell me I’m wrong: DJ and Rahm over the field at East Lake? TOP 10 RISERS AMONG THE TOUR CHAMPIONSHIP FIELD Dustin Johnson: 110 spots (from No. 111 to No. 1) Kevin Kisner: 55 (No. 76 to No. 21) Mackenzie Hughes: 41 (No. 69 to No. 28) Daniel Berger: 39 (No. 45 to No. 6) Collin Morikawa: 36 (No. 41 to No. 5) Ryan Palmer: 25 (No. 48 to No. 23) Jon Rahm: 19 (No. 21 to No. 2) Billy Horschel: 19 (No. 49 to No. 30) Harris English: 17 (No. 24 to No. 7) Viktor Hovland: 17 (No. 44 to No. 27) Notes: Johnson has held at least a share of the 54-hole lead in three consecutive tournaments, going 2-1-2. … Kisner has three top-4s in his past seven starts. … Berger has been one of the top players of the summer, winning the first event back at Colonial and racking up three other top-3s, climbing all the way to 13th in the world. … Morikawa had a playoff loss and two victories this summer – none bigger, of course, than the PGA. … Hughes nearly won at the Honda this year and added four more top-15s, his latest coming at the BMW, where he got up-and-down from a greenside bunker on the 72nd hole to earn his first Tour Championship berth. TOP 10 FALLERS AMONG THE TOUR CHAMPIONSHIP FIELD Marc Leishman: 18 spots (from No. 7 to No. 25) Cameron Champ: 14 (No. 15 to No. 29) Cam Smith: 13 (No. 13 to No. 26) Kevin Na: 13 (No. 11 to No. 24) Rory McIlroy: 9 (No. 3 to No. 12) Sungjae Im: 8 (No. 1 to No. 9) Lanto Griffin: 8 (No. 8 to No. 16) Patrick Reed: 7 (No. 6 to No. 13) Brendon Todd: 7 (No. 4 to No. 11) Sebastian Munoz: 6 (No. 9 to No. 15) Notes: Leishman, who won at Torrey Pines, bottomed out with a 30-over par week at the BMW and admitted that he’s struggled with energy and his swing. … Champ took the season-opening Safeway but didn’t have another top-10 until the PGA. … Na slid down the standings despite top-10s against strong fields at the Travelers and Memorial. … Dropping nine spots, McIlroy battled a wandering mind this summer and didn’t have a single top-10 (his longest drought in more than a decade), and now we know part of the reason why – he and wife Erica are expecting the couple’s first child, a girl, this week. … In 11 restart events, Im, the season-long points leader prior to the break, had only a pair of top-10s. … Todd was a two-time winner this season and also blew leads at the Travelers and WGC-FedEx St. Jude Invitational. LEAST MOVEMENT OF ANY PLAYER Hideki Matsuyama: 0 spots (stayed at No. 10) Rickie Fowler: 0 (stayed at No. 94) Webb Simpson: 1 (improved from No. 5 to No. 4) Adam Long: 1 (improved from No. 32 to No. 31) Justin Thomas: 1 (dropped from No. 2 to No. 3) Joaquin Niemann: 1 (dropped from No. 17 to No. 18) Joel Dahmen: 1 (dropped from No. 37 to No. 38) Give it a grade: Tiger’s 2019-20 PGA Tour season PLAYED THEIR WAY OUT OF A TOUR CHAMPIONSHIP BERTH Ben An (dropped from No. 23 to No. 33) Patrick Cantlay (dropped from No. 29 to No. 34) Tyler Duncan (dropped from No. 27 to No. 40) Adam Scott (dropped from No. 20 to No. 41) Nick Taylor (dropped from No. 18 to No. 48) Tom Hoge (dropped from No. 22 to No. 50) Carlos Ortiz (dropped from No. 26 to No. 51) Andrew Landry (dropped from No. 30 to No. 61) Tiger Woods (dropped from No. 28 to No. 63) Notes: Tabbed by many as a 2020 breakout candidate, Cantlay didn’t win this season and had just three top-12s (none better than a T-7) during the restart. … Scott took the longest break of any big-name player, opting not to return until the PGA. … Woods didn’t return until the Memorial and played the fewest number of overall events (seven) of any BMW participant, by three. None of his restart results were inside the top 35.last_img read more

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Fitzpatrick and Lowry share lead at BMW PGA

first_imgVIRGINIA WATER, England – For all the brilliant shots in his round, Matt Fitzpatrick couldn’t help but return to the only bad swing he made as the Englishman threw away the outright second-round lead on his last hole at the BMW PGA Championship on Friday. Fitzpatrick was 9 under through 17 holes and enjoying one of the great rounds on Wentworth’s storied West Course when he sent his approach at No. 8 left. The ball went into the trees, rebounded out, and dropped into the water. He wound up with a double-bogey 6 for a 7-under 65, leaving him tied for the lead with Shane Lowry (65) at 12-under overall at the European Tour’s signature event. ”If I was 4 or 5 under total, it’s nothing,” Fitzpatrick said. ”But when I’m 9 under par and leading by two, it is a little worse. Full-field scores from the BMW PGA Championship ”Every shot counts. Two shots ahead can be a big difference come Sunday afternoon.” Fitzpatrick would do well focusing on the many good parts of his round, not least the stretch of shots he picked up at the start of his second nine. After making a long putt for birdie at No. 2, he splashed out of a greenside bunker and into the hole for birdie at No. 3, then chipped in from the fringe with a 60-degree wedge for eagle at No. 4. He had seven birdies and an eagle in all, the late double-bogey being the only blot on his card. ”Everything went my way,” the 20th-ranked Fitzpatrick said, ”bar the [next-to] last hole.” Lowry, the reigning Open champion, managed to avoid trouble all the way through his round, making seven birdies and not dropping a shot to follow up an opening 67. Since 2011, no player has more rounds of 67 or lower at Wentworth than Lowry. The co-leaders, who went out in the morning and enjoyed the best conditions of the day, were a stroke clear of Tyrrell Hatton, who recovered from a bogey at No. 1 to shoot six birdies and a 67. Hatton was one of three players tied for the lead after the first round. French player Victor Perez was two shots further back, at 9 under overall, after a 66. Patrick Reed, the American who leads the Race to Dubai standings with five more regular tour events left in the pandemic-affected season, shot 68 and was 6 under overall, six strokes behind Lowry and Fitzpatrick.last_img read more

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Thanks, Dr. Oz — Our Favorite Super Bowl Ad, a Beautiful Celebration of Complex Senses

first_img“A Summary of the Evidence for Intelligent Design”: The Study Guide Intelligent Design Thanks, Dr. Oz — Our Favorite Super Bowl Ad, a Beautiful Celebration of Complex SensesSarah ChaffeeFebruary 5, 2018, 2:07 PM Origin of Life: Brian Miller Distills a Debate Between Dave Farina and James Tour “Did you know there’s a world of miracles inside our bodies?” That was the striking first line in a Super Bowl commercial yesterday — Dr. Oz promoting Turkish Airlines.With beautiful photography and ethereal music, Dr. Oz proceeds to tell us about how our senses of smell, hearing, taste, and sight present marvels of fine tuning.Those miracles he’s talking about? Dizzying complexity and extreme order — the kind of information best explained, as we would put it, by intelligent design. They are patterns that reflect our experiences of what mind, not meaningless chance, creates. TagscommercialDr. OzeyesGeoffrey SimmonshandshearingHoward Glicksmanintelligent designodor moleculesolfactionpapillaesalmonsensessightsmellsoundSuper Bowltastetaste budstouchTurkish Airlinesvision,Trending Email Print Google+ Linkedin Twitter Share Jane Goodall Meets the God Hypothesis Email Print Google+ Linkedin Twitter Sharecenter_img A Physician Describes How Behe Changed His MindLife’s Origin — A “Mystery” Made AccessibleCodes Are Not Products of PhysicsIxnay on the Ambriancay PlosionexhayDesign Triangulation: My Thanksgiving Gift to All Sarah ChaffeeNow a teacher, Sarah Chaffee served as Program Officer in Education and Public Policy at Discovery Institute’s Center for Science and Culture. She earned her B.A. in Government. During college she interned at Representative Jaime Herrera Beutler’s office and for Prison Fellowship Ministries. Before coming to Discovery, she worked for a private land trust with holdings in the Southwest. Share Requesting a (Partial) Retraction from Darrel Falk and BioLogos Recommended Congratulations to Science Magazine for an Honest Portrayal of Darwin’s Descent of Man Let’s examine each in a little more depth than what a commercial can in a minute and thirty seconds:Your eyes. The CSC’s video from last fall on the eye explains more about these organs and shortcomings of Darwinian accounts for their origin.Smell. Remember Illustra Media’s discussion of the salmon’s nose? Well, olfaction requires many, many parts working together and scientists currently debate whether olfaction acts like a lock and key (odor molecules fit into receptors designed for them) or whether there is some kind of vibration that results in smell. Maybe a bit of both!How about taste? In his book, What Darwin Didn’t Know, Dr. Geoffrey Simmons discusses taste, among other topics:Stick your tongue out as far as you can in front of a mirror. You should see several bumpy growths at the rear — and if you strain a little, you might even see a V-shaped pattern of larger, button-like growths across the very back. These papillae contain most of our 10,000 taste buds. They are present by the third fetal month. Textbooks typically say we detect only four tastes: sweet (sucrose), salty (sodium chloride), bitter (quinine hydrochloride), and sour (citric acid) — but the tongue can actually also pick up metallic iron salts, umami (a meaty or savory taste — for example, monosodium glutamate), certain amino acids, and chalky tastes. Fat sensations can be sensed by the sides of the tongue, and a number of flavors, like chocolate, can be improved when pressed against the soft palate.Your ears. Dr. Howard Glicksman has an excellent post at Evolution News discussing our sense of hearing. He goes through each part of the ear and the role it plays in transmitting sound.And (though Dr. Oz doesn’t elaborate) touch! On that, scientists are currently trying to model the hand’s powers.But the harmony of the package itself — all five senses and the whole body working together — is another layer of complexity. Every intricate function whispers design and planning.It’s that coherence that allows you to discover the world. Or, as Dr. Oz and Turkish Airlines put it, to “widen your world.”Photo: Turkish spice merchant, via YouTube/Turkish Airlines.last_img read more

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