‘Second skin’ goes on over your real skin to smooth your wrinkles

first_img“Nobody dies of under-eye bags,” acknowledged Dr. Barbara Gilchrest, a dermatologist at Harvard Medical School and author of the paper, published in Nature Materials. But they do have social consequences for people. “It makes them look old. It makes them look tired. It makes them look sad. In our society, it’s considered very unattractive, and it’s a marker of aging.”For medical use, Langer said that the artificial skin has many advantages over products currently on the market. You can change the properties of the film — for example, its thickness, breathability, or elasticity — depending on the desired effect. You can also spread it over as large or small an area as you want. Currently, people who wear medicinal patches — like NicoDerm— are limited by commercially available sizes.For some conditions, like eczema and psoriasis, the area needing treatment may span much of the body, in which case an easily applied, drug-laden artificial skin could be a much better treatment option than a current approach, of slathering on a cream and wrapping the body in a kind of plastic wrap, Gilchrest said. By Ike Swetlitz May 9, 2016 Reprints Prices are skyrocketing for skin creams and pills “Second skin” polymer could also be used to protect dry skin and deliver drugs. Melanie Gonick/MIT Related: In the Lab‘Second skin’ goes on over your real skin to smooth your wrinkles To put on the skin, you apply two gels. The first is clear; the second, cloudy. As the gels dry, they harden into a flexible film that sticks onto your real skin not unlike the clear part of a temporary tattoo. After a few hours, it’s difficult to see the boundary between the two — the silicon-based material is specially designed with a matte finish so that it doesn’t draw attention. This stands in contrast to conventional patches, which may be transparent but are still visible. Samir Mitragotri, who studies drug delivery through the skin in his lab at the University of California, Santa Barbara, said he hadn’t before seen any material so transparent and so effective at changing the mechanical properties of the skin. Mitragotri, who was not involved in the study, called the approach “radical and revolutionary.”Left, the fake skin applied to the under-eye area. Right, untreated skin. Olivo LabsThe fake skin is in human trials, with a couple hundred individuals already tested. The company is working on developing the skin as a platform, after which they could decide to customize it by adding drugs.Amir Nashat, acting chief executive officer of Olivo and managing partner at venture capital firm Polaris Partners, said the company is spending the majority of its time focusing on the medical application of the second skin. On a further horizon, the paper noted, those might include “durable ultraviolet protection” or using the skin to conceal disfiguring birthmarks.But at present, the main thrust of the research they’ve published is cosmetic. It’s part of an over $60 billion cosmetics industry, which taps into an age-old desire for humans to retain their youthfulness.But focusing our attention on making us look younger doesn’t properly address the underlying discomfort we have with being old, argues Cara Kiernan Fallon, a history of science PhD candidate at Harvard studying attitudes toward aging.The proportion of Americans who are over 65 is at an all-time high, “and yet this had not led to widespread acceptance of physical changes, but instead a massive market for all kinds of procedures and products to remain young,” she said.“How can we age if, in essence, the only way to do it well is to not age at all?” High-tech bandage wins $100K from Boston Marathon bombing survivor’s family Related: As the gels dry to form the artificial skin, it pulls on and changes the shape of the real skin, and, with the proper application, could hide wrinkles or other properties associated with aging skin. In the paper, the authors demonstrated that the artificial skin was effective at removing bags and smoothing wrinkles under the eyes.advertisement It starts out like any one of a number of anti-aging treatments: rub some goo on your face, wait for it to dry. But this isn’t a skin cream or wrinkle serum, it’s an invisible polymer “second skin” that dries to tighten wrinkles and reduce skin sagging.“You put it on as an ointment, and it becomes a patch,” said Robert Langer, professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a founder of Olivo Laboratories, the company developing the fake skin. Researchers detailed the technology in a new paper published Monday.Put on as a daily mask, the skin becomes a kind of temporary cosmetic intervention. Further out, its developers hope the fake skin could be loaded with medications that would be absorbed through a person’s real skin.advertisement Tags skinwrinkleslast_img read more

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All-Ireland winner on site as work begins on new Laois astro pitch

first_imgSEE ALSO – €280,000 of cocaine seized and two arrests made after searches in Portlaoise and Kildare RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook Facebook Home News Community All-Ireland winner on site as work begins on new Laois astro pitch NewsCommunity Laois Councillor ‘amazed’ at Electric Picnic decision to apply for later date for 2021 festival WhatsApp Twitter Pinterest Principal Pat Galvin said: “Work got underway yesterday and this is great news for our school community.“All going well, it will be ready to go for our 600 pupils in September and it will be a huge resource for us.”Kieran Donaghy is the Business Development Manager for PST Sport – the company who are carrying out the project.He said: “We have started the artificial grass pitch that principal Pat Galvin has been working so hard on over the last number of years.“We can’t wait to get it ready for the students and it will be ready for them when they come back.“I feel a bit sorry for the outgoing sixth class but maybe they might get brought back for a bit of a blitz during one of the future holidays.“I hope the students will get great use out of these facilities and I hope they are getting on well during this very tricky time.“With God’s help, in September when they return, they will have a state of the art PST artificial playing surface to use no matter what the conditions are.” Bizarre situation as Ben Brennan breaks up Fianna Fáil-Fine Gael arrangement to take Graiguecullen-Portarlington vice-chair role News Twitter Electric Picnic TAGSKieran DonaghyPat GalvinScoil Phadraig National School Work has begun on a brand new astroturf pitch in Laois.Last year, primary school boys in Portarlington moved into a brand new school adjacent to McCann Park in the town.St Patrick’s BNS became Scoil Phádraig, Cúil an tSúdaire and it now has capacity for 24 mainstream classrooms, eight resource rooms and an ASD base catering for 12 children.The sports facilities are second to none with a fantastic hall, running track, three basketball courts and assorted play areas.All that was missing was an astroturf – and now work has gotten underway with All-Ireland winning Kerry footballer Kieran Donaghy involved. Electric Picnic Previous articleJoe Mallon Motors Car of the Week: 181 Renault Megane from €56 per weekNext articleNeed PPE for your business? Selection of Face Masks and Shields available to buy from locally-based company Digiprints Alan HartnettStradbally native Alan Hartnett is a graduate of Knockbeg College who has worked in the local and national media since 2008. Alan has a BA in Economics, Politics and Law and an MA in Journalism from DCU. His happiest moment was when Jody Dillon scored THAT goal in the Laois senior football final in 2016. WhatsApp By Alan Hartnett – 29th May 2020 All-Ireland winner on site as work begins on new Laois astro pitch Pinterest Electric Picnic organisers release statement following confirmation of new festival datelast_img read more

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The ‘Joy’ of Kim Il Sung’s Forced Firework Fun

first_img News The ‘Joy’ of Kim Il Sung’s Forced Firework Fun NewsEconomy SHARE News Facebook Twitter There are signs that North Korea is running into serious difficulties with its corn harvest US dollar and Chinese reminbi plummet against North Korean won once againcenter_img News RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR By Kang Mi Jin – 2014.04.17 2:01am The North Korean authorities regularly organize a fireworksdisplay to commemorate the anniversary of Kim Il Sung’s birth on April 15th. In fact, there have been two such displays since the Kim Jong Eun regime took power at the end of 2011: one on April 15th, 2012, and anotherthis year.However, while spectators watching the shows, which take place around the Juche Tower in central Pyongyang, appear to be enjoying them, sourceshave long alleged to Daily NK that this is not actually the case. Rather, they say the authoritiestreat the events as highly political in nature, and therefore compel watchers to express positiveemotions.This is because the displays provide the leadership with the opportunity to not only reinforce the filial piety of Kim Jong Eun, but also to promote the supposedly “monolithic governing system,” and advertize the overall stability of the state. All these elements require that people react positively to what they are watching. As one source from northerly North Hamkyung Province reported to Daily NK on the 16th,“I heard that they held a fireworks display in Pyongyang to celebrate Taeyangjeol [Day of the Sun], and itmade me think, ‘People will be out there acting their part yet again.’ They wouldn’thave been able to complain even if they had wanted to.”Although Pyongyang can seem distant from other regions of North Korea, there are still a lot of interactions between the capital and provincial areas. These allow the transmission of information about the events, and inform perceptions nationwide. The source revealed, “In 2012 a group of a few dozen model members of the Unionof Democratic Women in this province were taken up to visit Kumsusan Palace [inPyongyang, where Kim Il Sung and Kim Jong Il’s embalmed corpses are stored],” thesource recalled. “They were then taken to watch the fireworks, and got told by the authorities that they hadto show joy and excitement […] Heads of units ordered their people not to disperse whilewatching the fireworks, and to raise the atmosphere by cheering and expressing awe any time cameras appeared.”“Most of the people who went to Pyongyang at that time now reckon that the people ensuring that everyone plays their part in these events areactually from the military or SSD (State Security Department),” the source concluded. “They hadalways assumed from watching television that they were just students, butchanged their minds after going there and checking their appearance and way ofspeaking at close quarters. They say you can tell frompeople’s faces that their ‘enjoyment’ is forced.” North Korea Market Price Update: June 8, 2021 (Rice and USD Exchange Rate Only) Kang Mi JinKang Mi JinKang Mi Jin is a North Korean defector turned journalist who fled North Korea in 2009. She has a degree in economics and writes largely on marketization and economy-related issues for Daily NK. Questions about her articles can be directed to [email protected] last_img read more

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Ex advisor fined $115,000

first_img A former financial advisor in Ontario must pay a global fine of $115,000 to the Toronto-based Investment Industry Regulatory Organization of Canada (IIROC) for triggering unnecessary deferred sales charges (DSC) for his clients, and engaging in inappropriate personal financial dealings. Between 2009 and 2011, Paul Darrigo, who was an advisor with HSBC Securities (Canada) Inc. in Oakville, Ont., repeatedly bought and sold mutual funds with a DSC for clients. An IIROC investigation found that many of these mutual funds were held for a short period of time — less than one year — and that Darrigo would often purchase similar funds following a redemption of a DSC fund. Clients who testified at the IIROC hearing said they either did not understand DSC fees, or had explicitly instructed Darrigo to avoid such transactions. Facebook LinkedIn Twitter In total, IIROC found that Darrigo redeemed over $2.9 million in DSC mutual funds for nine clients during the time in question. As a result, these clients were charged $116,000 in DSC fees. Furthermore, IIROC documents state that Darrigo received $69,000 in commissions as a result of these transactions while the clients incurred a loss of $72,000. As well, the IIROC hearing panel found Darrigo borrowed a total of $45,000 from clients in 2010. According to IIROC, Darrigo advised the clients to redeem investments in order to lend him the money. HSBC was not aware of the loans. Darrigo failed to repay the loans, according to IIROC. Instead, HSBC repaid clients their principle but not the interest on the loan. Out of the total fee, $95,000 represents a disgorgement of Darrigo’s commissions and the loan proceeds. In addition to the fine, Darrigo must undergo a 12-month period of strict supervision and pay $65,000 in costs. HSBC terminated Darrigo’s employment in 2011 and he is not currently a registrant with an IIROC-member firm. Related news Mouth mechanic turned market manipulator BFI investors plead for firm’s salecenter_img Fiona Collie Keywords EnforcementCompanies Investment Industry Regulatory Organization of Canada PwC alleges deleted emails, unusual transactions in Bridging Finance case Share this article and your comments with peers on social medialast_img read more

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Better Local Roads: Glismann Road/Beaconsfield Avenue and Princes Highway intersection upgrade

first_imgBetter Local Roads: Glismann Road/Beaconsfield Avenue and Princes Highway intersection upgrade Cardinia Shire Council has now started preliminary works to upgrade the Glismann Road/Beaconsfield Avenue and Princes Highway intersection in Beaconsfield. The intersection will be upgraded to be a fully signalised intersection with:upgraded street lighting pavement widening on Princes Highway a new left-turn slip lane into Beaconsfield Avenue extended right turn lane into Beaconsfield Avenue dual right turn lanes out of Beaconsfield Avenue extending Glismann Road to the intersection pavement resurfacing underground drainage upgrades signalised bicycle crossings landscaping works. The Glismann Road/Beaconsfield Avenue intersection is the second Old Princes Highway intersection project after O’Neil Road intersection works under a broader program to upgrade a number of priority intersections along the Princes Highway in Cardinia Shire over the next three years.  The program is funded by Cardinia Shire Council’s Better Local Roads – Princes Highway Intersection Project ($17.8 million) and the Australian Government’s Urban Congestion Fund ($17.8 million).Cardinia Shire Council Mayor and local Beacon Hills Ward Councillor Brett Owen said traffic modelling identified several intersections along the highway needing an upgrade to cater for increasing traffic volumes.   “Council is committed to improving roads across the shire, and we have a number of exciting and innovative roads projects underway as part of our Better Local Roads Program. “As well as the Princes Highway Intersection Project, we’re also creating more sealed connections throughout the existing road network through the $25 million Strategic Sealed Roads Project and the $150 million federally-funded Sealing the Hills Project. We will continue to strive to improve the standards of our roads to increase safety and comfort for all road-users,” Cr Owen said.Federal Member for Latrobe, Jason Wood said, “I am very proud to secure federal funding to upgrade eight intersections along the Princes Highway between Pakenham and Beaconsfield. The Glismann Road/Beaconsfield Avenue intersection is the second project after O’Neil Road intersection works.“The Liberal Morrison Government’s Urban Congestion Fund ($17.8 million) to upgrade a number of priority intersections along the Princes Highway in Cardinia Shire will cut travel times and make roads safer while boosting jobs and the economy,” Mr Wood said.The Glismann Road/Beaconsfield Avenue and Princes Highway intersection works are expected to be finished mid-2021.   /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Australian, Australian Government, Beacon, Beaconsfield, Cardinia, Cardinia Shire Council, council, Economy, Federal, Government, Latrobe, local council, Morrison, Morrison Government, Owen, project, Wardlast_img read more

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UK PM House of Commons Statement on COVID 12 May 2021

first_imgUK PM House of Commons Statement on COVID 12 May 2021 Mr Speaker, with permission, I will update the House on our response to Covid.The patience and hard work of the British people has combined with the success of the vaccination programmeto reduce deaths and hospitalisations to their lowest levels since last July,and from Monday, England will ease lockdown restrictions in line with step 3 of our roadmap.This will amount to the single biggest step of our journey back to normality.But after everything we have endured, we must be vigilant because the threat of this virus remains realand new variants pose a potentially lethal danger,including the one first identified in India which is of increasing concern here in the UK.So caution has to be our watchword.Our country – like every country – has found itself in the teeth of the gravest pandemic for a century,imposing heart-breaking sorrow on families across the worldwith more than 127,000 lives lost in our United Kingdom alone.And our grief would have been still greaterwithout the daily heroism of the men and women of our National Health Service,the protection of our vaccines,already in the arms of over two-thirds of adults across the UK –and the dedication of everyone who has followed the rules and sacrificed so much that we cherish.Amid such tragedy, the State has an obligation to examine its actions as rigorously and candidly as possible,and to learn every lesson for the future,which is why I have always said that when the time is right there should be a full and independent inquiry.So Mr Speaker, I can confirm today that the Government will establish an independent public inquiry on a statutory basis,with full powers under the Inquiries Act of 2005,including the ability to compel the production of all relevant materials,and take oral evidence in public, under oath.In establishing the Inquiry, we will work closely with the Devolved Administrations as we have done throughout our pandemic response,and My Right Honourable Friend the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster has this morning spoken to the First Ministers of Scotland and Wales, and the First and Deputy First Ministers of Northern Ireland to begin those conversations.Every part of our United Kingdom has suffered the ravages of this virus,and every part of the State has pulled together to do battle against it,and if we are to recover as one Team UK – as we must –then we should also learn lessons together in the same spirit.So we will consult the devolved administrations before finalising scope and detailed arrangements, so that this Inquiry can consider all key aspects of the UK response.Mr Speaker, this process will place the State’s actions under the microscope,and we should be mindful of the scale of that undertaking and the resources required to do it properly.The exercise of identifying and disclosing all relevant information,the months of preparation and retrospective analysis,and the time that people will have to spend testifying in public, in some cases for days,will place a significant burden on our NHS, on the whole of government, on our scientific advisers, and on many others.We must not inadvertently divert and distract the very people on whom we all depend in the heat of our struggle against this disease.And the end of the lockdown is not the end of the pandemic.The World Health Organisation has said that the pandemic has now reached its global peak and will last throughout this year.Our own scientific advisers judge that although more positive data is coming in and the outlook is improving, there could still be another resurgence in hospitalisations and deaths.We also face the persistent threat of new variants,and should these prove highly transmissible and elude the protection of our vaccines,they would have the potential to cause even greater suffering than we endured in January.And there is in any case a high likelihood of a surge this Winter when the weather assists the transmission of all respiratory diseasesand the pressure on our NHS is most acute.So I expect the right moment for the inquiry to begin is at the end of this period, in the Spring of next year, Spring 2022Mr Speaker, I know there will be some in this Chamberand many bereaved families –who will be anxious for an Inquiry to begin sooner.So let me reassure the House, that we are fully committed to learning lessons at every stage of this crisis.We have already subjected our response to independent scrutinyincluding seventeen reports by the independent National Audit Office and fifty parliamentary inquiries –and we will continue to do so.We will continue to learn lessons as we have done throughout the pandemic.But no public inquiry could take place fast enough to assist in the very difficult judgements which will remain necessary throughout the rest of this year and the remainder of the pandemic.And we must not weigh down the efforts of those engaged in protecting us every day, thereby risk endangering further lives.Instead this Inquiry must be able to look at the events of the last year in the cold light of day –and identify the key issues that will make a difference for the future.Free to scrutinise every document,To hear from all the key players,and analyse and learn from the breadth of our response.That is the right way, I think, to get the answers that the people of this country deserve,And to ensure our United Kingdom is better prepared for any future pandemic.Mr Speaker, entirely separately from the Inquiry,there is a solemn duty on our whole United Kingdom to come together and cherish the memories of all those who have been lost.Like many across this Chamber, I was deeply moved when I visited the Covid Memorial Wall opposite Parliament,and I wholeheartedly support the plan for a Memorial in St Paul’s Cathedral, which will provide a fitting place of reflection in the heart of our capital.I also know that communities across our whole country will want to find ways of commemorating what we have all been through.So the Government will support their efforts by establishing a UK Commission on Covid Commemoration.This national endeavour – above party politics – will remember the loved ones we have lost;honour the heroism of those who saved lives and the courage of frontline workers who kept our country going;celebrate the genius of those who created the vaccines;and commemorate the small acts of kindness and the daily sacrifice of millions who stayed at home, buying time for our scientists to come to our rescue.We will set out the Commission membership and terms of reference in due course.And in telling the whole story of this era in our history, we will work again across our United Kingdom, together with the Devolved Administrations,to preserve the spirit which has sustained us in the gravest crisis since the Second World War,resolving to go forwards together, Mr Speaker, and to build back better.And I commend this statement to the House. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:British, frontline workers, Government, health, India, Ireland, Lancaster, pandemic response, PM, Scientists, Scotland, terms of reference, UK, UK Government, United Kingdom, vaccination, World Health Organisationlast_img read more

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Southern Ontario collision leads to tanker truck full of wine tipping over

first_img While there were luckily no significant injuries, the eastbound highway lanes remain closed, though the westbound ones were reopened at 6:30 am Friday. The SUV driver was charged with impaired driving, and refusing to give a breath sample. COMMENTSSHARE YOUR THOUGHTS First Look: 2022 Lexus NX The sport-cute’s looks have been softened, but its powertrains and infotainment offerings have been sharpened advertisement PlayThe Rolls-Royce Boat Tail may be the most expensive new car everPlay3 common new car problems (and how to prevent them) | Maintenance Advice | Driving.caPlayFinal 5 Minivan Contenders | Driving.caPlay2021 Volvo XC90 Recharge | Ministry of Interior Affairs | Driving.caPlayThe 2022 Ford F-150 Lightning is a new take on Canada’s fave truck | Driving.caPlayBuying a used Toyota Tundra? Check these 5 things first | Used Truck Advice | Driving.caPlayCanada’s most efficient trucks in 2021 | Driving.caPlay3 ways to make night driving safer and more comfortable | Advice | Driving.caPlayDriving into the Future: Sustainability and Innovation in tomorrow’s cars | Driving.ca virtual panelPlayThese spy shots get us an early glimpse of some future models | Driving.ca The Rolls-Royce Boat Tail may be the most expensive new car ever We encourage all readers to share their views on our articles using Facebook commenting Visit our FAQ page for more information. RELATED TAGSFlexNew VehiclesOntarioToronto & GTAFlexGuelphOntariocenter_img Trending Videos If you were snobby about boxed wine, wait until you hear about tanker wine.A collision on Highway 401 near Guelph, Ontario, just east of Highway 6, late Thursday evening saw an SUV sitting still in a live lane of traffic get hit by a pickup truck.That crash cut off a tanker truck hauling wine, resulting in the rig flipping, hitting the median, and sending concrete debris flying across all lanes of traffic. Trending in Canada See More Videos Police reported an extensive cleanup operation was underway following the collision, as well as an investigation, though it’s difficult to ascertain if the cleanup was more about concrete debris than it was spewing fountains of tanker wine. ‹ Previous Next ›last_img read more

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“Campus Printing Initiative” Could Save CU-Boulder 7.5 Million Prints Per Year

first_imgShare Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Published: Aug. 18, 2003 The CU-Boulder campus will begin a new system of printing from campus laser printers on Aug. 20, implementing a new “Campus Printing Initiative” that is expected to reduce usage by as much as 7.5 million prints per year, based on reductions at other major universities. The program will require anyone using printing sites in ITS labs, housing and the libraries to pay 10 cents for the first page of each black-and-white print, 9 cents for the second side and $1 for each color print. Students can print from computers using their Buff OneCard student IDs. Credit for printing can be added to Buff OneCards either online or at locations around campus. Non-student users will be able to purchase vending cards for printing, and departmental vending cards also will be available. Students will receive an initial free quota of 100 black-and-white prints, which will be credited to Buff OneCards upon their return this fall. “Aside from the obvious environmental impacts, the program will allow students to pay according to their own usage and not be penalized for heavy usage by others,” said Bobby Schnabel, associate vice chancellor for academic affairs. “The initiative will place a stronger emphasis on service with staffing available to load and maintain printers from 8 a.m. until 8 p.m. on weekdays and 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. on weekends. Color printing, which was not an option previously, now will be available.” Usage at other major universities has declined from 30 percent to 70 percent when similar programs have been established. CU-Boulder’s cost estimates for the program are based on a planned print reduction of 50 percent, and an increase in double-sided printing. Faculty are encouraged to accept duplex prints for course assignments. The anticipated paper savings is the equivalent of 1,260 trees, 3,150 pounds of air pollution, 367,500 gallons of water and 215,355 kilowatt hours of electricity annually from the manufacturing processes. The savings also could eliminate 4,252 cubic feet of landfill space. The program emerged from several years of study, discussion and student input. A 1999 student opinion survey conducted by CU-Boulder’s Environmental Center indicated that 69 percent of students either strongly supported or somewhat supported the concept. The Department of Housing piloted the program in a successful trial in the residence halls during the 2001-2002 academic year.last_img read more

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From nanoscience to not-so-science

first_imgShare Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Image captured from Glimpse MultiMedia video coverage of the event. Categories:Getting InvolvedCampus Community CU-Boulder JILA Fellow David Nesbitt is used to working his way around chemistry laboratories, but working his way around the dance floor is a different story altogether.Nesbitt was one of eight celebrity dancers participating in the 6th Annual Dancing with the Boulder Stars event held on Oct. 18, 2012 at the Boulder Theater. This annual fundraiser is held by the You, Women, Children, All of us Center (YWCA) in Boulder to raise money for the organization’s mission of human services, advocacy, educational programs and racial justice initiatives.The event is similar to the popular television show Dancing With The Stars, where Hollywood celebrities and professional dancers pair up to rehearse and compete in a dance competition.Nesbitt said the reason he chose to enter the competition was to pay tribute to his wife.“My wife is a really good dancer, and I’m more of a fear dancer,” he said. “So this was more like paying homage to my wife.”Besides facing the perceived challenge of having two left feet, Nesbitt said time constraints and stepping out of his comfort zone proved big personal tests.“Part of it was trying to get 13 rehearsals into my teaching and travel schedule,” he said. “That was quite a physical challenge, but the other part of it was getting over my fear.”While Nesbitt maintains he had no talent for dancing, both the judges and audience begged to differ. Nesbitt and his professional dance partner Pat Connelly, the director of Blue Moon Dance Company, were the seventh couple to take the stage. The duo danced a beautiful waltz, requiring both precision and elegance, and received praise from the judges and audience.Nesbitt said that he was blessed to have the support of not only his wife, but also his family, colleagues and students.“My brothers and sisters were curious but very supportive….It was sort of outside their expectation for me, being the professor of the family. I’m grateful for the people in the biochemistry and several others in the chemistry department,” he said. “Also, my graduate students in my quantum mechanics class. It’s a scary position, putting myself out there, taking a risk.”Videos of the Dancing with the Boulder Stars performances can be seen on the YWCA of Boulder County’s YouTube channel. The organization is also a participant in the 2012 Colorado Combined Campaign. Published: Oct. 26, 2012 last_img read more

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From the Chancellor: Remaining strong as a campus community

first_img Please stay current on all campus updates at colorado.edu/coronavirus. This is a unifying moment for our campus, our nation and our world. I encourage us all to rise to this challenge and to come together for the health and safety of everyone. When this crisis is over, I would like us all to be proud of the legacy we are making for ourselves today.  March 13, 2020 Dear CU Boulder Students, Faculty and Staff:I am writing today to share my care for each and every one of you. In light of our first positive case of COVID-19 yesterday and our decision to cancel in-person classes today, I want to reinforce our commitment to meeting the challenges of the global coronavirus health crisis and to doing so by remaining strong and supporting each other as a campus community. First, I want to send best wishes to our impacted CU Boulder employee. Our hearts are with you, and we send our hopes for your full and speedy recovery. These are extraordinary times, and they require extraordinary actions from us all. Like thousands of communities around the world, we are now faced with exceedingly difficult decisions. I ask that we remain calm despite the news, continue to take care of ourselves and each other and continue our transition to remote learning and working for the remainder of the spring semester, beginning on Monday, March 16.With support from our campus technologists and academic administrators, our faculty are now determining how best to use technology, such as Canvas and Zoom, to enable our students to complete their educational requirements, consistent with what several other institutions are doing across the nation. Under the circumstances, remote learning is the best mechanism available for us to continue meeting our educational mission while complying with growing local, state and federal efforts to mitigate the spread of the virus through enhanced social distancing. For our faculty and staff, I understand the hardships this situation is causing for all, and—with the recent announcements of school district closures across the Front Range—that balancing work and family during this time will be difficult. We have asked our supervisors to be as flexible as possible with employees who have school-aged children. For those who have been given direction to work from home, please do so if possible.For those who question why our campus remains open, I want to remind you that we are both an institution of higher learning as well as a local community. To many of our residents, this is their only home. While we understand and support the decisions of those who might wish to relocate due to this crisis, we have hundreds of students and employees who live here full-time, rely on our services and do not have the option to leave. We also have laboratories with critical and highly sensitive research projects that require ongoing support to ensure their continuity. Because of this, and based on the latest public health guidance we are receiving, our campus will remain open to serve the many needs of our community.  Philip DiStefano Chancellorlast_img read more

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