Chick Corea And Bela Fleck Work Their Magic At Royce Hall

first_imgChick Corea and Béla Fleck performed some duet magic to an appreciative and attentive crowd at Royce Hall, an romanesque-styled concert hall on UCLA campus. Together, the duo artfully crafted classic, jazz fusion and a little bluegrass with fine syncopated precision that left this reviewer amazed at the sheer virtuosity of the performance.Béla Fleck (named after the great classical composer Béla Bartok) is regarded as one of the all-time great banjo players, with a long and distinguished career. He started in 1979 playing bluegrass, but has branched out to classical and jazz over the years. In 1988, Béla reached worldwide prominence as the founding member of Béla Fleck and Flecktones, winning several grammy awards for bluegrass music. Unlike the bluegrass music of Flats and Scruggs, the Flecktones were able to fuse bluegrass with jazz influences, for a unique and thoroughly enjoyable musical experience.In the early 1960s, Chick Corea started his legendary jazz career with the original jumpin’ jive master –  Cab Calloway – before finding a role as a keyboardist with the bebop deity, Miles Davis.  In the early 1970’s Corea was one of the founding members of Return to Forever, a legendary jazz band that help create jazz fusion music.  Like Fleck, Corea has teamed up with many jazz artists in a long and distinguished career.While the thought of a banjo and piano duet may sound a bit odd, the two seemed very comfortable with each other’s performing styles. Fleck and Corea have collaborated many times in the past, most notably in their 2007 album Enchantment.  This concert was definitely for the serious music listener. The performers dodged and weaved with each other through intricate steps of point and counterpoint, like two prima ballerinas. With each musician playing rhythm and lead simultaneously, it sounded as though four musicians were playing. It was a very rich and moving sound.The two musicians are undoubtedly masters of their trade. At certain times during the performance, Corea would reach inside the piano to play the piano bass strings by hand, yielding a bass line of full rich vibrato. Now that’s pretty innovative!The first set was more classical in nature with references to Chopin, Gershwin and Debussy during the more romantic interludes. Things got a bit more melodic as jazz and bluesgrass crept into the set with a full on crowd pleaser, “Mountain,” to close the first set.There was quite a bit of the clever repartee as both member traded stories and jokes; clearly very comfortable in each other’s presence.  Fleck was especially endearing talking about the birth of his son Juno, and played a wonderful song by the same name. One of the highlights was the Chick Corea song  “Joban Dna Nopia” …take a look and scramble the letters and you get: Banjo and Piano. All in all, this was a wonderful and memorable performance by two masters.–Richard Melamed[Photo Credit: KDHX]last_img read more

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A boy and his penny: How Austin Dillon helped connect NASCAR’s past and future

first_imgAustin Dillon saw him in the distance wearing a white Ford hat.It was the day before the Advance Auto Parts Clash, the non-points race one week prior to the Daytona 500, and Dillon was signing autographs.The boy approached him, big-eyed.“I told him, ‘Look, man, if you ain’t got a favorite driver, I’ll give you my hat if you choose me as your favorite,’ ” Dillon recalled to NASCAR.com while touring New York City this week as Daytona 500 champion.The terms were agreeable. Dillon whipped the hat off his head, signed it and handed it over. The boy thanked him and pledged his allegiance.The interaction was over. Until it wasn’t.Jordan Wade surprised Austin Dillon with a visit to the RCR shop on Wednesday. | Photo via RCR• • •The boy came back to Daytona the next day, and Dillon spotted him. It was easy — 11-year-old Jordan Wade was wearing his hat.Jordan yelled Dillon’s name and motioned him over. Dillon ran over.“Hey man, I have this for you,” Jordan said. He flashed a penny.“He gave me the hat, and I had to think of something to give him back in return,” Jordan said. “Most people wouldn’t pick up a penny, you know, but they’d pick up a quarter or a nickel. But I gave it to him for good luck.”Dillon’s mind immediately began churning, working its way backward to 20 years prior in 1998. The Intimidator. Wessa Miller. A lucky penny affixed to the dashboard of that No. 3 Chevrolet, which Earnhardt would famously steer into Victory Lane for the first time in his career in the Daytona 500.RELATED: A lucky penny for DaleAs Earnhardt posed for photo upon photo in Victory Lane that day, two little fellas joined him — Austin, then 7, and his brother Ty, then 5. It was a seminal moment in Austin Dillon’s life. He saw up-close Dale Earnhardt’s celebration, the joy exuding from his grandfather and team owner Richard Childress. It set his course on becoming a race car driver.That’s Ty Dillon (far left) and brother Austin in Victory Lane. | RacingOneTwenty years later, Austin Dillon drives the No. 3 Chevrolet for Richard Childress Racing.This clicked through his mind at perhaps a quarter-of-a-second when Jordan offered the penny.“I was like, ‘Hey man, that’s good karma’ because of Dale having the penny in the car,” Dillon said. “We had it in the Clash car, and it ran well and avoided the wrecks.”The Clash car, with the penny still inside, was sent back to Welcome, North Carolina, following the race. It had done its duty, stayed out of trouble and finished fifth. The No. 3 team had additional cars in Daytona Beach for the ensuing Can-Am Duel qualifying races and the Daytona 500 itself.But then the green flag dropped on the Can-Am Duel races, and there was Dillon navigating through wreckage and debris, avoiding it as best he could but not altogether, not liking the feel of the machine underneath as much as he did the previous race.He wanted his Clash car. He wanted the penny with it.“The car actually went home, and I wanted to bring the Clash car back. I said to make sure we have the penny in the car,” Dillon said. “The guy I asked to do it was my underneath guy, Kevin Gladman. I was like, ‘Guys, we have to get that penny back. They were like, ‘It’s in North Carolina.’ I told them it doesn’t matter.”The team made it happen, loading the hauler with the Clash car back up and driving down to Daytona in time for the weekend practices.MORE: Dillons shaped by 1998 Daytona 500• • •Austin Dillon, with a penny affixed to his No. 3 Richard Childress Racing Chevrolet, won the 2018 Daytona 500. He did so with a last-lap pass on race leader Aric Almirola, although “pass” is probably one of several words you could use to describe his move.“Turn” would work. Some might say “punt,” although the aggressive move which ended up sending Almirola into the outside retaining wall caused no ill will with the Stewart-Haas Racing driver.“We were both trying to win the Daytona 500,” Almirola would say after the race.ALMIROLA: ‘My heart is broken’After the race, Dillon cut donuts into the infield, with some of the marks left behind looking like a “3,” perhaps the most iconic number in all of NASCAR. It holds extra special meaning to the Childress family, and to Dillon and fans of Earnhardt Nation, many of whom still hold up three fingers on the third lap of every race.Brian Lawdermilk | Getty ImagesThat famous No. 3 Chevrolet from 1998 sits inside the RCR Museum to this day, the penny still glued on. One day, this No. 3 will join it with its penny still attached.“The penny’s going to live in that Daytona 500 car,” Dillon said. “I think it deserves it. It has a home. Most pennies that you find don’t have a home. That one has a home, you know what I mean?”With Dillon’s Daytona 500 win came a champion’s tour to New York City, where Austin and wife Whitney did their best to take in the sites of the city while also making the talk-show rounds.Dillon’s mind, on the rare bit of downtime it had to wander, invariably made its way back to Jordan.“There was something about this kid,” Dillon said. “I felt something good about him.”Dillon explained in detail how he wanted to get Jordan to the RCR shop, show him around. He likely had never seen the inside of a race car. Dillon wanted to pick him up and put him inside one, let him grab the steering wheel and cinch up.Unbeknownst to Dillon, his team was working behind the scenes to make that happen.On Wednesday, when Dillon and the No. 3 team were honored at Richard Childress Racing for their Daytona 500 win the day after touring New York City, Jordan was there. He was wearing a familiar hat.“We were all hoping that he was going to win,” Jordan said from the RCR shop. “Then, with the luck I gave him, he won.”Dillon gave Jordan that shop tour, with the two posing for pictures with fellow driver Darrell Wallace Jr., who finished second. Wallace Jr., who drives the No. 43 Chevrolet for Richard Petty Motorsports, is the first African-American driver with a full-time ride in the Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series since 1971.His runner-up finish in the “Great American Race” is the best ever for a driver of color. Richard Petty Motorsports and Richard Childress Racing announced an alliance over the summer, with RPM relocating its shop to be closer to RCR. The two teams celebrated the 1-2 finish together.Wednesday was a good day in Welcome.“As far as fan engagement, it’s special,” Dillon said. “It’s cool. I feel like I made a kid who didn’t know if he liked NASCAR, and he was just kind of learning about it, I feel like I made him love it. Because I gave him something, and he gave me something. We’ll be tied together for a long time.”It’s not unlike Dillon to want to give back, his wife, Whitney, chimed in. She’d been listening to the interview with NASCAR.com and couldn’t hold back this thought any longer.“One of my favorite things about Austin is that he is so caring and giving to every person that he comes into contact with,” Whitney said. “He has touched so many lives, and the impact that he has at RCR — he would never tell you this–– with all of the employees. He knows most of them by names, he knows their backgrounds. He takes time to go there almost every single day. Half of his pit crew, they lived with him for a while so they could get on their feet and get going. It’s just cool. When you give, it just comes back.”“I just try to give back a little to the fans who give us so much each and every weekend,” Austin Dillon added. “I just want ’em to love me.”• • •Dillon, 27, remains a part of NASCAR’s youth movement, although he’s a veteran of that group. Sunday was the second-youngest Daytona 500 field ever, so while being 27 is young, it’s not young in this current era of NASCAR.Certainly Dillon still remembers traipsing through the garage as a child, collecting cards and looking up to his heroes to sign them. It wasn’t that long ago.It’s those memories that linger now that Dillon is a driver himself. Every interaction he has with a child has meaning. Perhaps he simply makes a child’s day. Or perhaps he makes such an impact that the next Jordan he signs for is the next driver of the No. 3 Chevrolet.The impact on Jordan is clear. That boy who never experienced a NASCAR race before last weekend? Ask him what he wants to be when he grows up.“I want to be a NASCAR driver, now,” he said.That’s how Dillon felt when he was a kid, too. And guess what? Now, he’s a NASCAR driver.“I want people to experience what I’ve experienced since I was a kid, and be able to enjoy races and enjoy experiences,” Dillon said. “There’s a lot of good role models in NASCAR. When I was growing up, every driver would sign what I asked them to sign. My grandfather still does that.“The biggest thing is, you have to give back to the sport that’s given you what you’ve got. If I can create experiences for kids that will bring their kids here, the Daytona 500 will live on forever.”“I think it’s awesome to see what his involvement in NASCAR could be like,” Dillon continued. “Could he be the next president of a race team? An engineer? A crew chief? A driver? You never know what you’re creating when you meet a young kid that has everything in front of him.”In the middle of this discussion, Dillon paused when returning to the anecdote from the Clash. The hat on his head wasn’t the only thing he’d given away, and suddenly the driver made a connection.He gave the hat on his head to Jordan. Later, a young girl wearing a Chase Elliott hat walked by. Dillon good-naturedly teased her and asked if she’d consider becoming his fan, upping the ante with another hat his father had just purchased that day.That interaction drew a crowd. To be fair, Dillon said he’d give the hat away to whoever answered a trivia question correctly. The little girl didn’t get the question right. Another boy did, and he earned the hat.The girl wearing the Chase Elliott hat was saddened to see that second hat going to someone else, so the boy who received it kindly gave it to her. Moved, Dillon asked the boy to walk back to his golf cart. En route, Dillon took the shirt he was wearing, slipped it off over his head, signed it and gave it to that boy. He rode away in a golf cart, shirtless.It suddenly dawned on Dillon the number of items he gave away. Two hats. One shirt. Three, total.“Numbers are so weird,” he said, after a pause. “I gave away three things that night. That’s all I had to give away. Three.”He pauses once more.“Three is a magical number.”Contributing: Torey Foxlast_img read more

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Texas Medical Center Cuts EMS Service

first_imgKXXV-TV News Channel 25 – Central Texas News and Weather for Waco, Temple, Killeen | WHITNEY, Texas (KXXV) – A couple dozen workers are out of a job and this weekend Whitney is relying on ambulance service miles away. They’ve been working for 42 years and on Friday afternoon, the Lake Whitney Medical Center EMS closed its doors. Director Jimmy Hoskins even gave his final call just after 5 o’clock while his fellow workers and family fought back tears in the background.last_img

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Disabled Boy Pulled by Brother in Heartwarming Triathalons

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreSports Illustrated has named Conner and Cayden Long the 2012 SportsKids of the Year for their inspiring triathlon performances. Seven-year-old Cayden is unable to walk or talk on his own, but his nine-year-old brother Conner had an idea that would allow the two to participate in sports together.Conner pulls his brother with amazing determination letting him ride in a raft or cart, as the experience bringing them closer together with every race. (WATCH the video below, or READ the story from Sports Illustrated)AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

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Black Boy Embraces Cop in a Hug Felt Round the World

first_imgFreelance photographer Johnny Nguyen captured the moving moment, which was published by The Oregonian newspaper.(READ more of Devonte’s life story, before the photograph, in a New Zealand article from Nov. 10)AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMore AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreIf you have been on social media, or seen any talk about American current events you know there have been protests against the outcome in the Ferguson case, with the jury deciding not to prosecute the policeman who killed a black teen. But did you see the iconic photograph taken by a Portland freelancer that symbolizes everything that is still good in this country? The two people who were captured in that moment (see the photo below) have been showered with well-deserved media attention and praise.Devonte Hart, an African-American boy who survived an urban childhood that no one should have to bear, was rescued (along with his siblings), adopted and raised by a compassionate caucasian couple who helped him turn his life around. The 12-year-old and his  mom on Nov. 25 attended a protest rally in Portland shortly after the verdict was announced. Devonte planned to engage the crowd with favorite pastime, carrying a sign and offering FREE HUGS. In a Facebook post, Devonte’s parents, Sarah and Jennifer Hart, told the story behind the photo, which is being called “The hug felt ’round the world”.“We hit the streets (Nov. 25) with the intention of spreading love and kindness, and to remind (ALL) people that they matter in this world. … I noticed Devonte was struggling. Tears. He wouldn’t speak. He was inconsolable. My son has a heart of a gold, compassion beyond anything I’ve ever experienced, yet struggles with living fearlessly when it comes to the police and people that don’t understand the complexity of racism that is prevalent in our society.”“He trembled holding a Free Hugs sign as he bravely stood alone in front of the police barricade. Tears rushing from his eyes and soaking his sweater, he gazed upon them not knowing how they would react. After a while, one of the officers approached him and extended his hand.”“There were generic questions about his favorite subject and what he liked to do in the summer, but the one that mattered hit straight to the heart. He asked Devonte why he was crying. His response about his concerns regarding the level of police brutality towards young black kids was met with an unexpected and seemingly authentic (to Devonte), ‘Yes. *sigh* I know. I’m sorry. I’m sorry.’”The officer, later identified as Sgt. Bret Barnumthen, then pointed to the sign and asked, “Do I get one of those?”last_img read more

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DEATH NOTICES: Dec. 10, 2020

first_img Next UpClyde Thomas “Tom” Lawton, 74, of Groves, Texas died Thursday, November 26, 2020. Services pending with Levingston Funeral Home –Groves.William Loyd Moses, 90, of Groves, Texas died Tuesday, December 8, 2020. Services pending with Levingston Funeral Home – Groves.Mr. Christopher Griffin, 57 of Orange, TX died December 8, 2020. Services pending with Hannah Funeral Home, Inc. Charles “Charley” Leonard Pemberton, 95, of Beaumont, died Wednesday, December 9, 2020. Broussard’s, 2000 McFaddin Avenue, Beaumont.Bridgette Marie LeBlanc, 94, of Winnie, died Wednesday, December 9, 2020. Broussard’s, 505 North 12th Street, Nederland.Virginia “Ginger” Wilson, 69, of Port Neches, Texas died December 9, 2020. Services pending with Levingston Funeral Home – Port Neches.Mary Williams, 94, of Nederland, Texas passed away December 10, 2020. Services are under the direction of Melancon’s Funeral Home inNederland. Linda L. Tackwood, 73, of Port Arthur, TX died December 5, 2020. Services pending with Hannah Funeral Home, Inc.Junior Nico, 89, of Port Arthur, TX died December 7, 2020. Services pending with Hannah Funeral Home, Inc.Jeremy Scott LeJeune, 44, of Austin, Texas passed away December 6, 2020. Services are under the direction of Melancon’s Funeral Home in Nederland.center_img Era Marcelene Weeks, 86, of Nederland, died Thursday, December 3, 2020, Broussard’s, Nederland.Ray Austin Evans, 34, of Winnie, died Tuesday, December 8, 2020. Broussard’s, 2000 McFaddin Avenue, Beaumont.Helen Estes, 90, of Port Neches, Texas died December 8, 2020. Services pending with Levingston Funeral Home – Groves.Allen McMahan, 40, of Winnie, died Wednesday, December 9, 2020. Broussard’s, 2000 McFaddin Avenue, Beaumont.Joan Holland, 74 of Port Arthur, TX died Thursday, December 10, 2020. Services are pending at Hannah Funeral Home, Inc.last_img read more

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Fellows Gear Shaper building transformed into arts space, opening July 20

first_imgFor years, the Fellows Gear Shaper Building has loomed rundown and derelict along the Black River, a symbol of former Springfieldâ s glory as the machine tool capital of the world. The factoryâ s hidden creative possibilities were just waiting to be discovered. Now, nearly 40 years after the old factory closed its doors, those possibilities are about to be revealed. The 160,000-square-foot sprawling complex has a new name, a new look and a new purpose. The building, now known as One Hundred River Street, has been transformed into Vermontâ s newest venue for the arts. Inside, the Great Hall, a splendid, soaring space is about to be inaugurated as a great new venue for the arts, capable of showcasing large artwork and sculpture, performance art, dance, music and lectures. With the buildingâ s multi-million-dollar renovation nearly completed, the public is invited to the unveiling of the Great Hall at a reception slated for Friday, July 20, from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at One Hundred River Street. The first group art show, Emergence, features works by artists from around Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine and includes sculpture, stoneware, tapestries, mobiles and more. The work on exhibit was chosen to symbolize the adaptive-reuse of the building, and, as boosters suggest, the re-emergence of Springfield. The Great Hall is the vision of Rick Genderson and John Meekin, the project developers, to create a public art space for Springfield with the idea that art creates energy. â It will become a town center and gathering space and help draw attention to Springfield as a destination,’said Genderson. â It’s an area that’s gotten kicked from everybody, and here you have this beautiful old building on a beautiful river with an exceptional space. It needed some help, the area needed some help, and you had some good people there who were willing to work on it, and we were willing to take a chance on it,’he said. The Fellows Gear Shaper Companyâ s legacy helps tell the story of Springfield. â The first time I toured the huge, light filled space that was to become the Great Hall, the 14-foot walls, the huge overhead timbers and the soaring ceiling, it inspired contrasting images of a Gothic church with clerestory windows and one of the sprawling, gritty workrooms of the industrial factory, Fellows Gear Shaper,’said Nina Jamison, founder of Gallery at the VAULT and coordinator of the Great Hall. â Springfieldâ s boom time echoed in our footfalls.â  Jamison wanted to honor the history of the building and the machinists by using the word great in its modern connotations of excellence in the title of Great Hall.  A great hall in the middle ages was the main room of a royal palace or large manor house. At that time the word great simply meant big. With a soaring 25-foot ceiling and clerestory windows, the 150-foot-long by 45-foot-wide world-class public art space is unique in the region and will accommodate and compliment very large artwork and sculpture. When word got out about the Great Hall, via the Vermont Art Councilâ s website and other ways, the response was immediate from artists who had a difficult time finding display places for their extra-large work. â Within one month, a two-year lineup of shows was complete with both locally known artists and those who are more widely recognized, such as Fran Bull and Sabra Field,’Jamison said. Even before completion, the space spiked the creative juices in every artist who toured the Great Hall. Sculptor Carolyn Enz Hack decided to use her grant from the Vermont Community Foundation to create a sculpture in the Great Hall rather than at the more established Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center. She is among the artists who are featured in the first exhibit, Emergence. Others include Patty Sgrecci of Brandon, mobiles; Rich Hearn of Chester, oil on canvas; Scot Borofsky of Brattleboro, enamel on linen; Robert Carsten of Springfield, pastel; Robert Oâ Brien of Perkinsville, watercolor; Oliver Schemm of Saxtons River, sculpture; Carolyn Enz Hack of Thetford Center, sculpture; Stephen Procter of Brattleboro, stoneware, and Tapestry Weavers in New England (TWiNE): Suzanne Pretty of Farmington, NH; Betsy Wing of Hartland; Sarah Robbins Warren of Jefferson, NH; Priscilla May Alden of East Boothbay Maine and Eve S. Pearce of Bennington, VT. The entire project is a model of redevelopmentâ the Great Hall is icing on the cake, said Bob Flint, Executive Director of the Springfield Regional Development Corp. â Itâ s leveraging this vital part of Springfield’s heritage to once again become a center of activity for the future.” Flint has been a prime mover in the effort to assemble the private investments and public grants that made the project possible. He said this far-reaching economic development project for the region and the state â will impact our economy in so many ways. Itâ s a home run.â  In addition to the Great Hall, the mixed-use facility will include a medical center and space for retail and restaurants. Located on the Black River upriver from the impressive Comtu Falls, which cascade 110 feet down over a series of drops, One Hundred River Street stands at the entrance to the Designated Downtown of Springfield. A new 16â x32’historic mural by artist Jamie Townsend covers part of a long neglected building, an artistic â stepping stone’between the Great Hall and the heart of downtown. Historical information on the 1800â s Springfield to Charlestown NH Stagecoach is mounted next to the mural.  Renovations under way July 2011.last_img read more

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New Royalton town office opens, USDA reveals economic development strategy

first_imgVermont Business Magazine After years of operating in basement offices scattered throughout town, Royalton town officials celebrated the opening of their new office building Monday with local, state, and United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) officials.  USDA Rural Business Cooperative Service Administrator Sam Rikkers used the occasion to announce a new USDA initiative that will set aside $300 million in USDA Rural Development grants and loans for regionally significant projects.“Royalton’s new town office building is one of the first projects in the country to receive USDA grant and loan funds as part of a new community and economic development initiative emphasizing the importance of strategic regional planning,” said Rikkers. “By adhering to the Regional Plan, Royalton has ensured that this new facility benefits both the local community and the region as a whole. Regional planning is a critical keystone to building sustainable rural communities.”The Strategic Economic and Community Development Initiative, included in the 2014 Farm Bill, directs the USDA to prioritize projects that tie into long-term regional plans. Rikkers announced that the USDA will dedicate $300 million in loan and grant funds for the initiative across four USDA Rural Development programs this year: the Community Facilities Loan and Grant Program, the Water and Waste Disposal Loan and Grant Program, the Business and Industry Loan Guarantee Program, and the Rural Business Development Grant Program. Royalton used a $600,000 USDA loan and a $50,000 USDA grant to construct and equip the new municipal building. The new building will increase the town’s capacity to serve its residents and those of the surrounding towns of Hartford, Tunbridge, Bethel and Sharon. The new facility will enable the town to provide police and rescue services to the region through mutual aid agreements. Royalton cited the 2014 Two Rivers-Ottauquechee Regional Plan in its application, which made it eligible for the Strategic Economic and Community Development Initiative funding. During Monday’s announcement, Rikkers announced that the Vermont Technology Alliance (VTA), a non-profit business alliance which supports and promotes Vermont’s technology industry, received a $50,000 Rural Business Development Grant through the new regional initiative.  The VTA will use the grant to market and develop technology-based jobs across the state, with an emphasis on rural areas like Royalton. The VTA’s application tied into workforce development goals outlined in Vermont’s Statewide Community and Economic Development Strategy recently completed by the Vermont Agency of Commerce and Community Development. Source: ROYALTON, VT, Dec. 14, 2015— USDA. USDA, through its RD mission area, administers and manages housing, business and community infrastructure programs through a national network of state and local offices. Rural Development has an active portfolio of more than $211 billion in loans and loan guarantees. These programs are designed to improve the economic stability of rural communities, businesses, residents, farmers and ranchers and improve the quality of life in rural areas. For more information on Rural Development visit the Vermont/New Hampshire Rural Development website at www.rd.usda.gov/vt(link is external) or contact USDA RD at(802) 828-6000.last_img read more

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Four artist teams will present preliminary design concepts for an Art in State Buildings project

first_imgVermont Business Magazine The public is invited to attend a presentation by four artist/artist teams of preliminary concepts for a work of public art to be installed at the Vermont Agriculture and Environmental Lab in Randolph Center. The meeting will be held Wednesday, July 11 at 6 p.m. in Judd Hall at Vermont Technical College. During the meeting, the artists will present images, drawings, plans, or models as available.The project is part of the Vermont Art in State Buildings Program administered by the Vermont Arts Council in partnership with the Vermont Department of Buildings and General Services.The four finalists are:Dan Snow, DummerstonOliver Schemm, Saxtons RiverHeather Ritchie/Ryan Mays, BarreJim Sardonis, RandolphThe finalists were chosen from a pool of 21 applicants. Following the public presentation, the Project Review Committee — made up of building employees, community members, and visual arts experts — will meet to determine which artist/team will be selected to create the final work.Those who plan to attend are encouraged to RSVP.  Judd Hall is physically accessible for visitors who use wheelchairs or other mobility aids and those who prefer not to use stairs. To RSVP or to ask questions regarding accessibility contact Michele Bailey by sending an email to [email protected](link sends e-mail) or by calling 802.828.3294. Voice and relay calls are welcome.The Art in State Buildings Program is a partnership between the Vermont Arts Council and the Vermont Department of Buildings and General Services. Funded by the Art in State Buildings Act, the program allows up to two capital construction projects be selected each year. For more information on the Art in State Buildings program or other public art projects, visit http://www.vermontartscouncil.org/grants-and-services/artists/art-in-state-buildings(link is external).The Vermont Arts Council envisions a state where everyone has access to the arts and creativity in their life, education, and community. Through its programs and services, the Council strives to increase public awareness of the positive role artists and arts organizations play in communities and to maximize opportunities for everyone to experience the arts. Since 1965, the Council has been the state’s primary provider of funding, advocacy, and information for the arts in Vermont. www.vermontartscouncil.org(link is external).Source: Vermont Arts Council July 3, 2018last_img read more

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Almo Pro A/V E4 Experience Stops in Atlanta October 15th

first_imgAlmo Pro A/V will make its final 2019 E4 Experience stop in Atlanta on October 15th. E4 Atlanta features high quality courses worth AVIXA CTS Renewal Units (RUs), including a special session focused on the “next-generation workplace.” Other highlights include Almo’s new Zoom Room Bundles, an Almo Sound Options Audio Pavilion and an autograph signing with former Atlanta Hawk, Spud Webb.“More than 600 resellers, integrators and end users registered for the New York Metro E4 Experience,” said Melody Craigmyle, vice president of marketing for Almo Professional A/V. “We issued hundreds of CTS RUs and certifications for Digital Signage and SDVoE trainings led by our team of all-star educators. Our attendees engaged in valuable conversations with more than 40 vendors showing the latest technology and integrated systems. We are taking this momentum to Atlanta next week where we will conclude our most successful year of E4 Experiences in terms of attendance and accreditation.”Craigmyle said that next week Kay Sargent, director at HOK Workplace is presenting the session, “The Next Generation Workplace,” which examines space planning and the impact the Generation Z’s will have, emerging differences in lifestyle/culture/workstyles and their effects on the next generation workplace.Other E4 Atlanta courses include:SDVoE AV-Over-IP Design Certification (1 CTS RU)Digital Signage Certification- Foundations of Digital Signage (1 CTS RU)KEYNOTE: An Unbiased Explanation of AV-Over-IP (1.5 CTS RUs)Designing for the User Experience (1 CTS RU)Exhibit Hall Production Tours (2); AV-Over-IP In Action (1 CTS RU)AV in an IT World (1 CTS RU)Introduction to Windows Collaboration Displays (1 CTS RU)Universal Serial Bus (USB) Deep Dive Technology Exploration for AV Design and Integration (1 CTS RU)Installation Issues for Converged AV/IT Systems (1 CTS RU)Top 10 (+4) Things Gary Kayye Saw at InfoComm 2019 (1 CTS RU)See related  SpinetiX and Almo Pro A/V Announce Distribution Partnership for US MarketLast month, Almo announced new Zoom Room hardware bundles, all of which will be stocked and ready for shipping in the U.S. and Latin America. Designed to transform any area into a modern, easy-to-use power collaboration space, the bundles make it easy for integrators to get all of the necessary components in a single box, with a single SKU from a single supplier. The Zoom Room bundles will be shown next week at the Atlanta E4 Experience, as will a live demo room called the Sound Options Experience. Sound Options is Almo’s dedicated audio sourcing and technical engineering group. New additions to the pavilion include ClearOne, Yamaha Unified Communications and MXL. Also featured is Ecler Audio, which is exclusively distributed in the U.S. by Almo.E4 Atlanta is on October 15 at The Hotel at Avalon in Alpharetta, Georgia and runs from 7:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. local time and are free, including parking, for Almo Pro A/V resellers, integrators and their end users. For more information, go here.last_img read more

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