John Major: UK not opposed to free movement, but EU must do more to help limit immigration

first_img whatsapp whatsapp Sarah Spickernell Thursday 13 November 2014 8:51 am Show Comments ▼center_img Share Tags: UK immigration John Major: UK not opposed to free movement, but EU must do more to help limit immigration Later today, former Prime Minister John Major will warn an audience in Germany of the consequences of a split between the UK and the rest of the EU.  Speaking to the supporters of German Chancellor Angela Merkel’s Christian Democrats in Berlin, he is expected to describe the two parties as being “close to a breach that’s not in our interests or theirs”. While pointing out that the UK is not opposed to the principle of free movement, he will say it is unable to continue accepting the number of EU migrants arriving in the country at their current rate. He will emphasise the importance of the bloc helping the UK to limit immigration into the country, since otherwise it will fuel the case for leaving the EU. However, he warned earlier this year that leaving the EU would leave the UK isolated. Current Prime Minister David Cameron has pledged to hold an EU membership referendum in 2017 if he is unable to renegotiate the UK’s position in the bloc before then.  Cameron has faced sharp criticism from MPs who believe independence would be economically detrimental to the UK, but Major has previously said he believes Cameron will succeed in reclaiming powers from Brussels before the referendum date arrives. last_img read more

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All of today’s GAA results

first_img WhatsApp All of today’s GAA results WhatsApp Twitter TAGSGAA results Ten Laois based players named on Leinster rugby U-18 girls squad Home Sport GAA All of today’s GAA results SportGAA Midlands Park Hotel U13 Hurling Division 1 Shield Semi Final (Extra time if necessary)Rathdowney Errill 2-6 Castletown Slieve Bloom 0-5All-Ireland Intermediate Camogie Championship Round 1Cork 3-23 Laois 0-6Laois Shopping Centre ACHL Division 1A Rosenallis 1-23 Clonad 1-12Laois Shopping Centre ACFL Division 3 Round 11Portarlington v The Heath – The Heath walkoverKilleshin v Stradbally – rescheduled to TuesdayMidlands Park Hotel Under-17 Football League Division 2 Group B Round 5Portlaoise B v Rosenallis – points given to PortlaoiseLaois Shopping Centre ACFL Division 2 Round 11O’Dempseys GraiguecullenTimahoe  AnnanoughKilcavan  Park RatheniskaLaois Shopping Centre ACHL Division 4 Round 7Abbeyleix St Lazarians Colt/St Fintan’sSEE ALSO – Profiled: The Laois players bidding for Leinster final glory in Croke Park tomorrow Community Facebook Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Pinterest Previous articleLeinster Final Memory: Another year, another tear as Dubs defeat Laois in 2007Next articleWATCH: Abbeyleix GAA drop 20k to a packed house Siun Lennonhttp://heresosiun.blogspot.ie/2016/09/the-lekkie-piccie-experience.htmlSiún Lennon joined LaoisToday in a full-time capacity after studying Journalism and New Media in the University of Limerick. She hails from Rosenallis and her interests vary from news, sports and politics. Community Rugby By Siun Lennon – 23rd June 2018 Facebook Pinterest Five Laois monuments to receive almost €200,000 in government funding Charlie Flanagan on Electric Picnic: ‘I’d ask organisers to consult with community leaders’last_img read more

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A closer look at social impact bonds

first_img Feds plan to issue first green bond next year Both governments and non-profit organizations need to take steps to ensure they can take advantage of the potential of social impact bonds (SIBs) as a vehicle for funding socially-useful ventures, according to a new report from the Mowat Centre. The public policy think tank issued a new paper Monday, From investment to impact: The NFP experience with social impact bonds, which examines the phenomenon of social impact bonds, and whether they can provide a way to fund social programs with private capital. Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Related news “Advocates see SIBs as a vehicle for innovation, while critics fear that they will be used by government to offload social spending,” it says. “In fact, it is still early days and the evidence is not yet available to determine their success, failure, threat or promise.” So far, there has only been one SIB launched in Canada, the report notes. There is, however, growing interest in the idea, as governments increasingly look to “focus on directing resources to those programs and services that deliver the most positive social impact”; and, as the idea of “impact investing” grows among investors. “Through a structured agreement with government to pay the returns to investors, SIBs are designed to provide this mixed social and financial return to investors,” it notes. For the model to have a chance at succeeding, the report suggests that the non-profit sector “needs to be at the table to help shape what SIBs will look like in Ontario. To do this effectively, they need to negotiate with a strong sense of what their needs are and how to structure a contract that will provide them with the appropriate resources, funding tools and competencies to achieve success.” And, it suggests that the sector needs to lay the groundwork for these discussions by first conducting strategic self-assessments; defining the roles and expectations of participants in these arrangements to ensure that non-profits can focus on service delivery and achieving successful outcomes; and, establishing costing structures to ensure that programs funded through SIBs are effectively resourced. Governments also have a role to play in getting SIBs off the ground the report says, “by ensuring the right conditions for development and demonstrating long-term commitment. This means creating the conditions for successful negotiation, building a strong evidence base, and ensuring that the process leads to better public policy.” The report recommends that this process include: facilitating negotiations; promoting transparency and reducing future transaction costs by ensuring that negotiated contracts are shared openly by default; ensuring that the metrics used to evaluate outcomes reward real long-term social impact, not short-term gains; establishing best practices and collecting data that supports policy innovation and evidence-based policy-making; and, establishing a policy working group at the beginning of the SIB process to learn from the results and identify future policy opportunities. Keywords Bond center_img Share this article and your comments with peers on social media James Langton Throne speech agenda signals ‘healthy’ bond issuance, continued QE TSX sustainable bond trading gets thumbs uplast_img read more

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CIBC AM announces new portfolio subadvisor

first_imgBeatrice Paez Toronto-based CIBC Asset Management Inc. (CIBC AM) is naming Sydney, Australia-based Maple-Brown Abbott Ltd. (MBA) as the new subadvisor for Renaissance Global Infrastructure Fund. With this appointment, which takes effect around June 27, MBA will lend it specialization in the management of globally listed infrastructure securities and multi-asset investment portfolios, Australian equities and Asia Pacific ex-Japan equities, the firm’s release says. “We continually evaluate our product lineup to ensure that investors are in the best position to receive strong, risk-adjusted returns from portfolio managers around the world,” says David Scandiffio, president and CEO at CIBC Asset Management, in a statement. “The enhancement announced today is expected to benefit our clients and strengthen our investment offering.” Franklin Templeton renames funds with new managers Keywords Fund managersCompanies CIBC Asset Management Change to Counsel Global Small Cap Fundcenter_img Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Related news NEO, Invesco launch four index PTFs Facebook LinkedIn Twitterlast_img read more

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Macquarie shutters equity sales, trading and research businesses in Canada

first_imgIt is understood that the job cuts were in Toronto and Calgary.The spokesperson said the firm remains “committed” to Canada, and it will continue to provide domestic cash equities execution services and provide access to its global execution platform.The spokesperson added in an email that Macquarie has more than 100 staff working across commodities trading and hedging, corporate finance and advisory, cash equities execution, futures, asset management and equipment leasing in a variety of sectors.Macquarie is headquartered in Sydney, Australia and has more than 15,000 employees in 27 countries. Goldman Sachs’ profits more than double, despite pandemic Canadian Press Keywords Investment banking Related news Morgan Stanley shutters Calgary office: report Australian financial services firm Macquarie Group Ltd. is shutting down its equity sales, trading and research businesses across Canada, the company confirmed Monday.A Macquarie spokesperson would not comment on how many jobs have been impacted. oad sign for kangaroos in Australia filedimage/123RF Pot company must pay dealer, court finds Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Share this article and your comments with peers on social medialast_img read more

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Families reap benefits of Tax-Free Childcare

first_imgFamilies reap benefits of Tax-Free Childcare Families using their Tax-Free Childcare accounts to pay for their childcare costs are benefitting from a government top-up worth up to £500 every three months, HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) has announced.But there are thousands of families across the UK missing out on the chance to save money on childcare. They too could join almost 248,000 families across the UK who saved money using Tax-Free Childcare in December 2020, an increase of almost 43,000 families from December 2019, and received a share of more than £25 million in government top-up payments.Tax-Free Childcare allows parents or carers who have children aged up to 11, or 17 if their child is disabled, to pay their childcare provider through the scheme, and receive a 20% government top-up on any money deposited.For every £8 per child a parent or carer deposits, they will receive £2 in top-up, up to the value of £500 every three months, or £1,000 if their child is disabled. That equals £2,000, or £4,000 for the care of a disabled child, for a whole year. The top-up is paid directly into the child’s account and is ready to use almost instantly.As children across the UK return to school, families can use the money to pay their childcare provider including childminder fees, after school clubs or sports activities, where the childcare provider has signed up to Tax-Free Childcare. Families could also save money now to earn the government top-up and use the money to pay for childcare, summer camps and play schemes during school holidays.Myrtle Lloyd, HMRC’s Director General for Customer Services, said:As children return to their schools, after-school clubs and nurseries, help is available towards the cost of childcare.Families using Tax-Free Childcare to pay their childcare provider are already benefiting from the 20% government top-up on deposits, and you could too. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:carer, childcare, children, Customs, director, Government, missing, money, parent, revenue, school, sports, UK, UK Governmentlast_img read more

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CU-Boulder Admissions Director Elected President Of National Association

first_imgShare Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Published: Oct. 26, 1998 Gary M. Kelsey, director of Admissions at the University of Colorado at Boulder, has been named president-elect of the National Association for College Admission Counseling (NACAC) and will assume office on Jan. 1.Director of Admissions at CU-Boulder since 1993, Kelsey formerly served as director of the Division of Minority Admissions and Community Affairs at Pennsylvania State University; associate director for Admissions and Guidance Services for The College Board; assistant dean of Student Services/director of Academic Advisement and Orientation at Coppin State College; and regional director of Admissions at the University of Pennsylvania.An active member of NACAC and the Rocky Mountain Association for College Admission Counseling, Kelsey currently serves as president of the Rocky Mountain region, made up of Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming. At the national level, he served NACAC as vice president for Human Relations from 1990 to 1993.NACAC is an educational association of more than 6,500 secondary school counselors, college-university admissions and financial aid officers and counselors, and others who work with students as they make the transition from high school to post-secondary education.last_img read more

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Colombian neighbors guide design project that leaves students tired but inspired

first_imgShare Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail By Kenna Bruner • Published: Dec. 13, 2019 A group of students in the environmental design program returned from a six-week hands-on planning studio last summer in Colombia with a broadened perspective of life in a marginalized community. For some of them, the experience was life-changing.Students collaborated directly with the community of Carpinelo 2 in Medellin, Colombia, helping residents design and implement a community development plan.  Jota Samper, assistant professor in the Program in Environmental Design, leads the practicum and studio, a CU study abroad experience in Medellin with partners at the Universidad Nacional and the Corporación Con-Vivamos for 12 students each summer. It is one of several such experiences provided by the program each summer.Medellin is a unique place to learn about informal settlements because of its revolutionary urban strategies to manage and improve poor communities. Learning about the urban processes Colombia is implementing opens the door to discover unconventional practices that can better the lives of some of the 1 billion people worldwide who are living in informal urban communities.The 2019 project in Medellin was supported by a CU Boulder Outreach Award.Samper, who is from Medellin, focuses his work on marginalized communities and trying to figure out ways to serve the needs of people living below standard conditions in informal urban settlements. He has been working as an architect, planner and artist for 13 years, and he teaches architecture and urban design.“There are many study-abroad projects directed toward working with marginalized communities in the in the developing world,” Samper said. “For example, they develop a new potable water tech or an energy production system, and then they deliver it to a community. This project differs from those in that we do not arrive with a preconceived idea to Medellin. We define, design and develop the projects with the community. The community members are the experts who know what the problem is and we develop a solution with them.”In the Medellin project, students:Learned about planning and urban design methodologies Engaged with a marginalized community, working side-by-side with community members to produce a plan for neighborhood developmentLearned about innovative urban upgrading practicesThe project focused on diminishing environmental risk and providing spaces for community engagement, so the students built outdoor cement stairs to replace the steep dirt path that always got washed out during the frequent heavy rains, a pergola with a community table and chairs, terraces for gardening, a small playground and a planter next to the home of the abuela (the community matriarch).There are three stages to the project. The first two weeks are dedicated to understanding the community partner. Next is time spent designing a solution vetted by community members, who decide whether that solution will solve their problem. And last is the time spent building, which can be hard and intensive.“Students arrive with personal goals,” Samper said. “After they begin working, many of them retailor their life path to set new goals that are more socially aligned. Realizing their project had a meaningful impact on people’s lives was a powerful moment for them. I hope students take away from the project a level of humanity to understand levels of inequality. And see how the skills they’re learning in environmental design can be used to help bring more fairness to the world we live in.”ENVD students talk about their experiences in MedellinMarie Obermeier, a sophomore in the environmental design program, and Dean Behary, a senior in sustainable planning and design in urban design, went on the Medellin trip for the experience and came away with an aspiration to continue working with communities in need and to improve people’s lives. Describe your first impression of the neighborhood where you worked on the project?Obermeier​: It was a lot to take in. We could see all of Medellin from where we stood. Families were standing at their doorways waving to us and asking us questions even though we didn’t know the language. We walked through and around the whole neighborhood with the kids following us, curious about the visitors.Behary​: This experience was exactly what I wanted to get out of it. The families we stayed with didn’t speak English, so there was this whole language barrier, but it turned out to be one of the coolest experiences because we had to express ourselves and communicate in other ways. It added an intimacy to the relationship with the families. My Spanish definitely improved by the end. It was about establishing trust with them.What was your interaction with the people like?Obermeier: The community was very involved with this project; they had a say in everything we did. On our second day visiting the site, we met with the neighborhood abuela, or grandmother. We were invited into her house for coffee where we sat in a circle around her table. Jota, our professor, translated her story to us. I don’t think I’ve ever felt more motivated to build something before. The kids gave us nicknames. I was called teacher. They would run up to us every day giving hugs and fist bumps and worked with us side-by-side. Behary​: They didn’t know anything about us. We worked together and listened to music together. We sat together at the site every day and ate the meal they had fixed. We were doing so much together with the community you’d forget that when we first got there, we were strangers. What we did for them was about combining knowledge. It’s not me going in and telling them this is the way to do it. Tell about some highlights for you.Obermeier​: The whole experience was the highlight of my year. A highlight was building the playground structure. It was complete with a climbing rope and swing and we were able to make it out of bamboo and a recycled tire. It was the first time for me to see something that we designed come to fruition in this manner. One of my favorite moments was near the end of the trip. Everyone was dancing as we overlooked Medellin. It was around dusk and the ladies were laughing at seeing us dancing. The happiness during that time was energizing. Another time was our last day on the site. Everyone was sad, but they made the biggest pot of sancocho (a traditional Colombian dish). We sat around the table we had made and ate the lovely meal the community prepared for us as a thank you. We shared so much laughter and happiness with the community. It was a breathtaking experience and I will never forget it.Behary​: There are so many highlights. When we were walking down the hill for the final time, the little kids in the neighborhood followed us down. There was a dog in the community that followed us. Every evening when we’d leave to go (where we were staying), the dog would follow us to the train station. And the dog tried to follow us that last time. The path from the abuela’s house was too steep and rocky for her to walk on. She donated a plot of land at the site that she wanted us to develop a park and community space on. We built a staircase she could walk on from her house to the park area. On the last day of the job, watching her be able to walk up the stairs to the land that was literally nothing when we got there, but was now a park, was so beautiful I was literally in tears. You could see on everyone’s faces they were overwhelmed with joy.  Categories:Beyond BoulderEducation & OutreachCampus CommunityNews Headlineslast_img read more

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Mining Minister Confident Alpart will Re-Open Soon

first_imgAdvertisements RelatedMining Minister Confident Alpart will Re-Open Soon Mining Minister Confident Alpart will Re-Open Soon MiningNovember 29, 2012 FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Minister of Science, Technology, Energy and Mining, Hon. Phillip Paulwell, says he is confident that the Alpart bauxite and alumina plant at Nain, in St Elizabeth, will re-open soon, as discussions with U C Rusal, the majority share- holders and operators of the plant, are going well. Addressing a Rural Electrification Programme (REP) lighting ceremony, in Powell Town, Southfield, St. Elizabeth, on November 28, the Minister said the latest round of discussions with representatives of U C Rusal took place on November 27, and that another is scheduled for the near future. “We have to get Alpart re-opened, we have to get our bauxite/alumina back to where it was, and we have to get employment going. I have said to the representatives of UC Rusal, what you have there is precious to us, you have good reserves, and we cannot afford to keep the place locked down,” he said. The parish of St. Elizabeth has been affected economically, since the closure of the processing plant in 2009. Mr. Paulwell emphasised that before the end of this year, a date and schedule for the re-opening of the plant must be established. “I have said to them (U C Rusal) that before this year is out, we are going to have to come and tell the people of St. Elizabeth the date and schedule for the re-opening. The good news is that they continue to maintain the plant, even though it is closed,” he pointed out. The Minister said that energy generation is playing an important role in the re-opening of the plant, and that as soon as a solution is found to the energy issue, and that is expected by the end of December, then there will be a move to have the plant re-opened for business, which should lead to the generation of employment in the area. Mr. Paulwell added that the discussions also include a programme to make the mined out lands in the parish and other parishes available to persons who want to do farming, with some of the lands to be used as water catchments to support the farming projects. “By the end of January (2013), we intend to start the allocation of those mined out lands to farmers, who will have to take farming to a higher level,” he stated, adding that more scientific methods of farming might have to be adopted.center_img RelatedMining Minister Confident Alpart will Re-Open Soon RelatedMining Minister Confident Alpart will Re-Open Soonlast_img read more

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News / And SEKO Logistics prepares ‘watershed expansion’ by partner and acquisition

first_imgBy Alex Lennane 08/02/2018 The company said organic growth alone was no longer sufficient.“We are in the most exciting period for SEKO in its 40-plus-year history, with new opportunities being presented to us around the world by customers, partners and suppliers,” said Mr Gagne.“We are continuing to focus on organic growth, but this alone is not going to be fast enough to satisfy our ambitions in the coming years.”Mr Wascher added: “We’re ready to grow at an even faster pace as our upcoming news will demonstrate.”But he said the company would also look at other ways of expanding.“We’re evaluating tuck-in acquisitions, partners and ‘out of the box’ expansion opportunities,” he said.“This includes engaging with small independent forwarders that want to hear about the value of joining our network, as well as technology companies in the logistics space that want to join forces.“We may partner, we may buy. The first thing for other companies to realise is that we’re ready to listen – and able to demonstrate what coming together with SEKO can do for them and their customers.” DSV won’t be alone on the acquisition trail this year, as SEKO Logistics this afternoon said it would announce a major expansion in coming months.It was ready to grow its footprint in 2018, it said, both through recruiting new partners and strategic acquisitions.Due to be formally announced at the end of this quarter, SEKO will see a “watershed expansion … in terms of global reach”, said the company.To ‘spearhead’ this growth, SEKO said it would make some management changes, with William Wascher to take over as chairman and president James Gagne will also assume the role of CEO.last_img read more

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