Fourth quarter touchdown run give Dragons hard-fought 28-20 win over Peebles

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Arrow right #1 Icon Created with Sketch. Fourth quarter touchdown run give Dragons hard-fought 28-20 win over PeeblesQueen TD is difference in a Saturday afternoon on the gridironOctober 11, 2019Mark CarpenterSports0 By Mark Carpenter-For the past two seasons, the gridiron match ups between West Union and Peebles have been very lopsided in favor of the Dragons, with the Indians just trying to get their fledgling program off the ground. Last Saturday afternoon in Peebles showed just how far the Peebles program had come in a short time. In a game that was not decided until the first play of the final period, the Dragons again came out victorious but only by a final score of 28-20,It was a touchdown run by West Union quarterback Waylon Queen on the fourth quarter’s first play as the Dragons escaped with the hard-fought win, though the game wasn’t decided until just over a minute left when a final Peebles drive ended in an interception.“Hats off to Peebles,” said West Union head coach Scott McFarland after the win. “They played a great game and made some great plays. With our starting quarterback out and some key injuries and some players no longer with the team due to disciplinary actions, we were a bit short-handed.”It was a scorching hot fall afternoon on Saturday in Peebles, heat which took its toll on both teams as the game wore on. Things began well for the host Indians as they took the opening kickoff and drove the length of the field, getting a one-yard touchdown pass from Zane Knechtly to Wyatt Cluxton and a Mitchell Woods extra point to grab an early 7-0 advantage.The visiting Dragons were just as efficient with their opening possession, going yards in seven plays, culminating in a four yard scoring pass from Waylon Queen to Phillip Jarvis. The Peebles defense stopped the two -point conversion try and maintained their lead at just 7-6 with 2:58 left in the first quarter.The Dragons “D” recovered a Cluxton fumble on the next Indians’ possession, but gave it right back to the home team when Knechtly intercepted a Domonic Webb pass attempt. As the first quarter drifted into the second, the Indians took advantage of their good fortune, traveling 80 yards in just six plays, highlighted by big gains through the air from Knechtly to Dustin Rutherford for 30 yards and Cluxton in traffic for 21 more. The Peebles touchdown came on a 31-yard run around right end by Rutherford and another extra point kick by Woods gave the Indians a 14-6 lead with 11:22 left in the first half.That lead vanished on the next West Union possession, one that ate up 70 yards and nearly 10 minutes of clock. All but one of the 18 plays on the drive were running plays, the one pass being an acrobatic leaping catch by Jarvis in traffic. The long and time-consuming drive ended with Queen taking it in from two yards out and then adding the two-point run and the two teams went to the intermission deadlocked at 14.“We focused today on our power run game with a little play action passing and the guys really executed well,” said Coach McFarland. “We were successful in minimizing the turnovers and mistakes that killed us last week against North Adams.”The Dragons received the kickoff to begin the second half and quickly took their first lead of the day, going 52 yards in six plays and getting a perfectly executed 35-yard scoring pass from Webb to Jarvis, with the West Union receiver making a nice play back to the ball at the five-yard line and taking it across for a 20-14 West Union lead.“Phillip has a special skill to high point the ball,” said Coach McFarland. “He has great hands and leaping ability and has the attitude that every ball is his ball.”The Indians didn’t stare at that deficit for very long, taking the ball at their own 35 and after two big chunk runs by Rutherford, Knechtly fired a pass to Cluxton from 35 yards out, with Cluxton going up to make a leaping catch just inside the right pylon for the score. Peebles head coach Mike McDonald chose to try for two, but the West Union defense held and the two teams were tied again, this time at 20 with 7:53 remaining in the third quarter.The score that decided this exciting game came after the two teams had exchanged turnovers, Peebles’ Alex Combs picking off a West Union pass, and the Dragons’ defense making a huge play, recovering a Peebles fumble at the Indians 16 as the third quarter closed. On the very first snap of the fourth quarter, Queen went behind his strong offensive line and scored from five yards out to give the lead back the visitors. Queen also took in the two-point try to make it 28-20 in favor of the Dragons.The next four offensive possessions of the game all ended in either punts or turnovers on downs and it all boiled down to the final Peebles possession that began at their own 13 with two minutes to play and no timeouts. A quarterback sack by West Union’s Jack Steed put the Indians in a huge hole and the final nail in the Peebles coffin came with 1:01 to play when Jarvis intercepted a Knechtly pass to seal the deal for the Dragons. Two kneel downs later and the West Union squad had their second win of the season over the Indians, both of them very hard-fought, as the Dragons improved to 3-2 with the 28-20 triumph.“We knew the heat would wear both teams down in the second half so we used several different ball carriers to keep fresh legs in there,” said McFarland. ” Every week we focus on improving as a team and building a ‘team-first’ chemistry. We’re making progress.”Both teams will be back in action this Friday night, with the Dragons traveling to Brown County to battle the unbeaten Southern Buckeye Warriors. For Peebles, Friday night will be a memorable one as they host their Homecoming festivities and welcome the Manchester Greyhounds to town for a 7 p.m. kickoff.West Union6 8 6 8 —28Peebles7 7 6 0 —20Scoring SummaryFirst Quarter:Peebles- Cluxton 1-yd. pass from Knechtly (Woods kick)W. Union- P. Jarvis 4-yd. pass from Queen (conversion failed)Second Quarter:Peebles- Rutherford 31-yd. run (Woods kick)W. Union- Queen 2-yd. run (Queen conversion run)Third Quarter:W. Union- P. Jarvis 35-yd. pass from Webb (conversion failed)Peebles- Cluxton 35-yd. pass from Knechtly (conversion failed)Fourth Quarter:W. Union- Queen 5-yd. run (Queen conversion run)Peebles’ Dustin Rutherford eludes West Union tacklers on his way to a 31-yard second quarter touchdown run in the Indians’ 28-20 loss to the Dragons on Sept. 28. (Photo by Mark Carpenter)This strategy worked for the win on Saturday for the West Union Dragons as quarterback Waylon Queen burrows in behind his offensive line for the game-winning fourth quarter touchdown in a 28-20 win at Peebles. (Photo by Mark Carpenter) PreviousUnprecedented, four boys golf team from county make Div. III District Tournament appearancesNextSenior Profile- Mackenzie Leadingham, Manchester High School Around the WebThis Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s DeletedSecrets RevealedMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterThis Weird Method Can Restore Your Vision Naturally (Watch)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel Top Searches Top Searches MintiUnsung Hero 10-21-2022West center_img HomeSportsFourth quarter touchdown run give Dragons hard-fought 28-20 win over Peebles West Union receiver Phillip Jarvis extends high to haul in this second quarter pass in the Dragons’ 28-20 win at Peebles last Saturday afternoon. (Photo by Mark Carpenter) last_img read more

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Professional Research Assistant

first_imgJob SummaryThe Applied Physics Division at NIST encourages applications formultiple qualified Professional Research Assistants in support ofour existing efforts in superconducting nanowire single-photondetectors (SNSPDs) and transition edges sensors (TESs). One projectinvolves crafting large arrays of infrared-sensitive SNSPDs forhyperspectral imaging to support machine vision applications inlight-starved environments. Other projects are focused on quantuminformation applications and involve integrating SNSPDs with iontraps and optimizing the speed of photon number-resolvingTESs.The University of Colorado Boulder is committed to building aculturally diverse community of faculty, staff, and studentsdedicated to contributing to an inclusive campus environment. Weare an Equal Opportunity employer, including veterans andindividuals with disabilities.Who We AreThe Professional Research Experience Program (PREP) is a specialpartnership between the National Institute of Standards andTechnology (NIST) and the University of Colorado Boulder. PREPprovides research opportunities to CU undergraduate and graduatestudents, as well as researchers with a Bachelor’s, Master’s, orPhD in NIST labs to gain research experience alongside NISTscientists.The particular group that needs a researcher is the QuantumNanophotonics Group under the Applied Physics Division atNIST.What Your Key Responsibilities Will BeDesign, fabricate, and test superconducting single-photon detectorsand associated readout electronic circuits.What We Can OfferThe salary range is $54,000 – $82,000 and will be based uponrelevant background and experience.BenefitsThe University of Colorado offers excellent benefits , including medical, dental,retirement, paid time off, tuition benefit and ECO Pass. TheUniversity of Colorado Boulder is one of the largest employers inBoulder County and offers an inspiring higher educationenvironment. Learn more about the University of Colorado Boulder .Be StatementsBe Adaptable. Be Impactful. Be Boulder.What We RequireMaster’s degree in electrical engineering, physics, chemistry or arelated field.What You Will NeedExpertise or a strong interest in learning nanofabrication.What We Would Like You To HaveExpertise in cryogenics, single-photon detection technologies, orhigh-throughput electronics is also desirable.Special InstructionsTo apply, please submit the following materials:Resume/CVCover Letter During the application process, you will need to enter contactinformation for one reference and we will request a letter ofrecommendation from them immediately following yourapplication.Review of applications will begin immediately and will continueuntil the position is filled.Note: Application materials will not be accepted via email. Forconsideration, applications must be submitted through C U Boulder Jobs.Posting Contact InformationPosting Contact Name: Lisa ValenciaPosting Contact Email: [email protected]last_img read more

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Curriculum Fellow in Cell Biology

first_imgHarvard Medical School’s Curriculum Fellows Program (CFP) ispleased to announce a full-time Curriculum Fellow position in theDepartment of Cell Biology. This is an exciting opportunity to workwith faculty members within the Department of Cell Biology todevelop, implement, and research novel training opportunities forCell Biology graduate students.The CFP is a postdoctoral service and training program focusedon curriculum development, teaching, and educational programming inthe biological and biomedical sciences. Curriculum Fellows workclosely with members of the HMS faculty and administration todevelop, deploy, and evaluate evidence-based graduate training.Fellows also receive mentorship and career advising to supporttheir development as educators and help them succeed in a varietyof education-focused careers. More detailed information about theCurriculum Fellows Program and the role of a CF can be found in the2021 CF cohort announcement available on our website.The primary responsibility of the Curriculum Fellow in CellBiology will be to develop and support graduate-level curriculum inthe Department of Cell Biology and to support a major NIGMS-fundedT32 training grant: Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Dynamics(MCD2).Responsibilities include:Working with faculty course directors and the PI of the MCD2training grant to manage and innovate courses offered by theDepartment of Cell Biology.Participating in the administration and planning of CellBiology 201, a course that is required for all first-year studentsin the Biological and Biomedical Sciences (BBS) graduateprogram.Organizing and overseeing multiple short courses, includingnanocourses (two-day courses that teach transferrable skills andupdate the community on the latest techniques and discoveries) anda two-week course in experimental design, platforms, andanalytics.Collecting and analyzing student academic and career outcomesdata to formally evaluate the MCD2 training program.Preparing components of annual progress reports for the T32training grant, administrative supplement applications to driveprogram innovation, and the competing renewal application for theT32 program.Working with faculty and students to develop and managepara-curricular activities that serve MCD2 training goals.Qualifications, job skills, andcompetencies:Ph.D. in Cell Biology or a closely related area by the time ofappointment.Prior experience or demonstrated interest in teaching.Outstanding writing and organizational skills.Demonstrated capacity for independence, perseverance, andinnovation, as well as the ability to work as part of a team. Fellowships are intended for early-careerscientist-educators. The CF appointment is renewable annually for amaximum of three years and is non-tenure-track. Fellows areappointed as Research Fellows and typically earn promotion to therank of Lecturer during the term of the fellowship. The ideal startdate for the Curriculum Fellow in Cell Biology is shortly afterAugust 1st, 2021. The current COVID-19 restrictions in place atHarvard Medical School mean this position is likely to beginremotely, but fellows will be expected to work in person in Boston,MA when this becomes possible.To apply:Applicants should provide an application package that includes acover letter that describes your interest in and qualifications forthis position, a CV, a teaching statement, and the names andcontact information of three professional references. The teachingstatement is an opportunity to describe your philosophy of teachingin the context of your own experiences.  Submissions will beevaluated according to the guidelines found on ourwebsite. A discussion ofdiversity, equity and inclusion is an important component of theteaching statement.Address emails to [email protected], attention Dr. BradleyColeman, Director of the HMS Curriculum Fellows Program. Review ofapplications will begin on May 17th and will continue until theposition is filled. We are an equal opportunity employer and allqualified applicants will receive consideration for employmentwithout regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin,disability status, protected veteran status, gender identity,sexual orientation, pregnancy and pregnancy-related conditions orany other characteristic protected by law. Curriculum Fellow in Cell BiologyInstitution:       Harvard MedicalSchoolLocation:         Boston,MACategory:        Faculty -ScienceType: Full Timelast_img read more

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Research Scholar – Neuroradiology

first_imgThe Department of Neuroradiology is seeking applications for aResearch Scholar. This position will have or develop anunderstanding of the FDA Regulations and guidelines for goodclinical practice, regulatory compliance and quality assurance, andsafety reporting requirements for clinical research.In order to be successful in this positin, the ideal candidatewill: Hold accountability for test articlesMaintain multiple departmental databases which will requireEPIC chart review and data entryProvide statistical analysis of the data from departmentaldatabasesUtilize data for manuscript preparation as well as preparingother manuscripts as directedPrepare and submit IRB protocols and consent for new studyprojectsBecome knowledgeable of all current study projects beingconducted in the department, completing the required assessmenttraining and study visitsAssist the department chairman in research dataacquisition. Qualifications : West Virginia University is proud to be an Equal Opportunityemployer, and is the recipient of an NSF ADVANCE award for genderequity. The University values diversity among its faculty, staff,and students, and invites applications from all qualifiedapplicants regardless of race, ethnicity, color, religion, genderidentity, sexual orientation, age, nationality, genetics,disability, or Veteran status. Bachelor’s Degree (MD, PhD or DO preferred)One (1) year of research experience preferredExperience with Microsoft Office – ExcelGood communication skillsAttention to detailEPIC and PACS trainingCITI traininglast_img read more

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Itamar Moses Wins First Tony Award for Best Book of The Band’s Visit

first_imgItamar Moses(Photo: Emilio Madrid-Kuser) Show Closed This production ended its run on April 7, 2019 Go back to opening night with Matt Rodin’s Red Carpet Challenge. The new Broadway musical The Band’s Visit has been named the Best Book of the 2017-2018 season at the 72nd Annual Tony Awards. The triumph marks the first Tony win for scribe Itamar Moses. The other nominees in the category were Tina Fey for Mean Girls, Kyle Jarrow for SpongeBob SquarePants and Jennifer Lee for Frozen. You can catch The Band’s Visit at the Barrymore Theatre.The Band’s Visit is based on Eran Kolirin’s 2007 film about an Egyptian police band that arrives in Israel to play a concert. After a mix-up at the border, they are sent to a remote village in the middle of the desert. With no bus until morning and no hotel in sight, these unlikely travelers are taken in by the locals. Under the spell of the desert sky, their lives become intertwined in the most unexpected ways.Itamar Moses makes his Broadway debut with The Band’s Visit. His off-Broadway credits include Bach at Leipzig, The Four of Us, Back Back Back, Completeness, Nobody Loves You and The Fortress of Solitude.Hats off to Moses on his first Tony win! Check out show clips from The Band’s Visit below. Related Shows The Band’s Visit View Commentslast_img read more

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Tootsie’s Lilli Cooper on Her ‘Cuckoo Bananas’ Tony Nomination & More

first_imgLilli Cooper (Photos: Caitlin McNaney for Broadway.com) In the 1982 film Tootsie, Jessica Lange played Julie Nichols, an soap star desperate for true human connection, and earned her first Oscar win. The role of Julie Nichols must be good luck, because Lilli Cooper, who is currently playing the character in the musical of the same name based on the film, has received her first Tony nomination. “It still feels so weird,” Cooper said to Ryan Lee Gilbert in a recent interview on Broadway.com’s #LiveAtFive about her nomination. “It’s truly cuckoo bananas. I will never take it for granted, and I will never look at it smaller than it is. I have worked my butt off, so I’m really proud of myself. The biggest compliments I’ve gotten is when people say, ‘You deserve this.’ I think it’s a rare thing for people, women specifically, to say, ‘Yes, I deserve this accolade,’ and I’m really proud to say I believe I do.”  Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 24:19Loaded: 0%00:00Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently behind liveLIVERemaining Time -24:19 1xPlayback RateChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedEnglishAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Cooper stars alongside fellow Tony nominee Santino Fontana, who brings both Michael Dorsey and Dorothy Michaels to life. “The most important thing to me was developing the relationship between Julie and Dorothy and have that be the most honest and real relationship,” Cooper said. “This show is hilarious; however, we’re telling a story that we want people to relate to. We have amazing one-liners and brilliant comedians on stage, but if you don’t care about the relationship and stories we’re telling, we’re not doing our job. Obviously, Julie has a different relationship with Dortothy than she does with Michael. The thing is, Santino’s Dorothy is so lovable. You want to be around her and know her, and I see that in Santino as well. He is such a great leader in this pack we have.”When it came to updating the show’s plot to be more timely, Cooper knew exactly what she wanted to talk to the show’s Tony-nominated scribe Robert Horn about. “I think we all knew that lifting the film and putting it on stage wouldn’t work. It’s problematic,” she said. “I felt really safe in the hands of this creative team. What I was most passionate about was that [Julie] was a lovable, true, multi-dimensional character that we cared about and understood. I sing this song in Act I called, ‘Then There was John,’ and it’s about the sacrfices Julie made for the thing she loves, which is acting. [During the pre-Broadway Chicago run] there was a period where the song was more about her relationship with this man than with her craft. It was a small lyric shift, but it really tranformed the storyteling of this song and made it so much more powerful. You see how passionate she is about the things she’s wiling to sacrifice and risk in her life.” View Comments Tootsie Santino Fontana and Lilli Cooper in Tootsie (Photo: Matthew Murphy)center_img Related Shows Star Files Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 5, 2020 Tootsie marks Cooper’s fourth Broadway show, and it’s her third time originating a role on stage, having previously starred as Elphaba in Wicked and originating the roles of Martha in Spring Awakening and Sandy Cheeks in SpongeBob SquarePants. “Thinking about all the roles I’ve played on Broadway, I’m so happy to realize that they’re all so strong,” Cooper said. “I feel really lucky to have played all those roles and that I can represent that type of woman on stage. And the type of woman I’ve represented on stage has really run the gamut: From German teenager to squirrel to a literal witch, all those different kinds of women can all be strong, awesome ladies.”Catch Cooper in Tootsie, now playing at the Marquis Theatre.Watch the full #LiveAtFive episode below! Lilli Cooperlast_img read more

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Miller : Second Climate Economy Summit offers plan of action

first_imgby Ron Miller Last year, the Vermont Council on Rural Development (VCRD)  launched the Vermont Climate Change Economy Initiative. Organizers believe that making a deliberate, planned effort to guide economic activity in the state toward climate change mitigation and adaptation can “build national reputation, create jobs, and attract youth and entrepreneurism.” At a daylong summit attended by more than 400 business and community leaders, science and policy experts, and other citizens from around the state, VCRD gathered dozens of ideas and a clear sense of direction about how to proceed, and appointed a Vermont Climate Change Economy Council to draft a comprehensive plan. This group held three public forums around the state in the past year to further explore possible approaches.Numerous strategies, involving partnerships, public policy and investment, have been considered. Some involve business incubation and technology development; others look at ways to put a higher price on carbon emissions. Economic spheres from agriculture and energy to  tourism and transportation are getting special attention.On February 22 this year, a second summit will be held to receive and review the Council’s recommendations. Once again, VCRD is drawing on its unique ability to bring together movers, shakers and regular citizens from multiple sectors and across political divides to discuss a unified and comprehensive strategy.It is very encouraging to see that so much thought, outreach, and dialogue are being focused on these questions. Due to climate change as well as other environmental and global economic challenges, the industrialized world is entering a transition to what many observers are calling a “postcarbon” economy and society. So much that we take for granted in the modern age was made possible by cheap, potent sources of energy like coal and oil, on which we now see that we can no longer depend indefinitely.There have been few, if any, major transitions in human history that were navigated so deliberately. Usually cultural change is prompted by wars, famines, demographic shifts, new inventions and other accidental events. Now we are applying foresight and attempting to work collaboratively to design a new economy and culture for the planet’s changing conditions. The Climate Change Economy Initiative is not another conventional strategy for economic development—it is a bold effort to redefine economic development.In this new postcarbon age, the economy needs to be more “green,” more fair and inclusive, more holistically responsive to the natural environment and human communities.  As many activists around the country are putting it, we need to pursue a “just transition”—a systemic shift rooted in social and economic justice. In other words, a green economy should not be a green light for those with advantages of wealth or influence to unheedingly exploit new opportunities for profit. There are some tangled and tricky issues to work through. For example, in our (laudable) enthusiasm to develop and promote renewable energy sources, we have sometimes allowed old ways of doing business to override community concerns about human health or the natural landscape.Ideally, the Climate Change Economy Initiative provides a forum where all voices are heard and all stakeholders have their concerns taken seriously. Still, our accustomed industrial-age patterns can be hard to shake off, and it will take a sincere, patient effort to move forward together into the new economy of a postcarbon age. The more voices at the table, the better. Join this conversation! See VCRD’s website, vtrural.org, for information about the initiative and about registering for the summit.Ron Miller is the chair of the board of Sustainable Woodstock.last_img read more

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Tebbetts: How can you help support Vermonters? Choose dairy

first_imgby Vermont Agriculture Secretary Anson TebbettsSummer is synonymous with creemees, and well-timed ones at that: June is not only the beginning of summer, it is also National Dairy Month.This annual tribute recognizes an industry that has supported Vermonters for 150 years.  A month to celebrate the food that dairy provides, and the hardworking families who have produced that food while stewarding the land and landscape that sets Vermont apart from so many other places. Unfortunately, this year, June also marks our fourth month of COVID-19 response. And although Vermont’s farming history has been fraught with challenges, the year 2020 has brought greater challenges to Vermont dairy than any farmer could have imagined throughout the past two centuries.In the 1840’s, sheep dominated Vermont’s farming landscape. By 1860, Vermont had lost a quarter of its sheep due to tariff changes and competition from western states.1 Dairy farming became the alternative to wool production in Vermont by the 1880’s, and soon hill farms with cows were established as the leading contributor to the state’s economy.Fast forward 150 years, and Vermont dairy has remained a leader in the state’s economy.  According to the USDA Agricultural Census, in 2017 Vermont dairy receipts totaled more than a half billion dollars, accounting for 65% of Vermont’s total agriculture receipts2. Dairy farming keeps Vermont’s landscape open and scenic, supporting many other key Vermont industries. To name just a few, working lands as well as Vermont’s dairy heritage and culture are catalysts for cheese and maple production, recreation and year-round tourism.COVID-19 has impacted demand and decimated markets that have otherwise kept Vermont dairy farmers surviving through already difficult times.  Challenging pricing structures, political instability, environmental concerns, and competition from large dairy farms were already pushing some to leave dairy production.  Now our collective response to COVID has forced 17 Vermont dairies out of business since March, and more are teetering on the brink of devastation.What can we do? First; farmers would like all Vermonters to learn how our dairy industry supports our rural communities and state economy.  Second; seek out and purchase products from our Vermont dairy farmers and producers. How can you do this you ask?  Visit www.VermontDairy.com(link is external).  Not only can you learn about the important positive impacts of Vermont’s dairy industry, but you can show support and purchase Vermont dairy by connecting directly with farms and food in your community.  Visit Support Vermont Dairy(link is external) to discover the farmers and value-added dairy business in your area.We are Vermonters; we are also consumers. Any increase in demand will help our farm families and rural communities in their fight to stay viable, and help our state move through COVID-19 and protect the land we all love.For 150 years our dairy families’ work has cultivated and stewarded our Vermont. In their time of need, let’s thank them for their service to Vermont. Let’s show them that we “Support Vermont Dairy(link is external)”.last_img read more

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PR Bar of Florida launches educational scholorship foundation

first_img December 1, 2009 Regular News THE PUERTO RICAN BAR ASSOCIATION OF FLORIDA recently hosted its Seventh Annual Gala. This year the theme for the gala was “Education: Educating Tomorrow’s Leaders Today.” In light of the theme, and to mark its commitment to education, the PR Bar launched the Puerto Rican Bar Association of Florida Scholarship Foundation. The foundation’s exclusive purpose is promoting and supporting the enrollment and graduation of future leaders. For its work assisting at-risk youth in pursuing higher education, the PR Bar honored Aspira of Florida. The PR Bar also honored Dr. Larry Calderon, vice president for community and governmental affairs at Nova Southeastern University, for his support of the PR Bar and his involvement in ensuring access to education, with a focus on new programs that meet the current demographic needs of the community. NSU was also recognized as a “beacon of education and a Hispanic Serving Institution.” Those in attendance included, from the left, Broward County Judge Carlos Rebollo, president of the Caribbean Bar Association; Cherine Smith; Broward County Judge Marina Garcia Wood; Justice Fred Lewis; PR Bar Outgoing President Nydia Menéndez; PR Bar President Marisol Gomez; Broward County Judge John Frusciante; and Second District Regional Vice President Myriam Irizarry. Other officers include Regional Presidents Hector Rivera, Frank Rullan, and Monica Santiago. PR Bar of Florida launches educational scholorship foundationlast_img read more

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Thousands gather for annual Minority Mentoring Picnic

first_imgThousands gather for annual Minority Mentoring Picnic BAR PRESIDENT Eugene Pettis, above right, shares career advice with law students Charles Gee, left, and Lionel “Ali” Bryan at the 10th Annual Minority Mentoring Picnic in Hialeah November 9. Law students from all over the state — and even some from out of state — gathered at Amelia Earhart Park hoping to receive advice from lawyers and judges while they work to get their law degrees and enter the legal profession. “It’s not easy to be successful at anything, but you can become the lawyer you want to be,” Pettis said. “That’s what I want you to leave here believing, and I tell you that with full confidence because I’m sure some of our paths are common, but I’ve never let where I started define where I was going.”Thousands gather for annual Minority Mentoring PicnicMegan E. Davis Associate EditorIntermittent rain and shine did little to dampen spirits at the 10th Annual Minority Mentoring Picnic at Amelia Earhart Park in Hialeah November 9.“To have the weather as inclement as it is and still see all of the people out here I think speaks to the strength of the picnic,” said Florida Bar President Eugene Pettis, donning shorts and straw hat in hand. “It’s truly a picnic that has such a defined purpose in the lives of so many people.”John Kozyak, founder of the picnic, said he expected 3,500 people at the event.Those include law students, recognizable by red “I need a mentor” stickers, crowded under the Law Student Mentoring and Networking tent seeking words of wisdom from seasoned attorneys and judges.Meeting with the students was “heartwarming,” Pettis said.“It’s not easy to be successful at anything, but you can become the lawyer you want to be,” he told them. “That’s what I want you to leave here believing, and I tell you that with full confidence because I’m sure some of our paths are common, but I’ve never let where I started define where I was going.”Pettis challenged the students to use the picnic to their advantage and reach out to the many lawyers and judges wearing blue “I need a mentee” stickers. “Out there is someone who can take you to the next level,” he said. “None of us have gotten to where we are on our own. There have been people who have given us opportunities that have lifted us and continue to lift us today.”In the way Pettis advised, hundreds of students moved from tent to tent sponsored by voluntary bar associations, law firms, and government entities, making new connections.Helene Wilson, a 1L at the University of Miami, said she’s already planning to attend next year’s picnic.“I connected with a lot of good people, talked about internship opportunities, and got information from several law firms,” she said. “It’s a wonderful event and something I’m very grateful for.”Kevin Piere, a 3L at Florida International University, agreed.“You get to talk to a lot of people, you get free food, and you get to mingle with lots of different law students,” he said.Most importantly, Piere walked away with job prospects.“I wanted to see if any firms are hiring first-year associates,” he said. “I talked to a bunch of different people and there might be a few possibilities out there, so it was worth it.”In hopes of creating more opportunities for students, the Bar’s Business Law Section presented a $1,000 donation to Kozyak and issued a friendly challenge to other Bar sections and divisions to follow suit.The money will be used to help underwrite clerkships, fellowships, and internships for students. In addition to networking, attendees played volleyball, enjoyed hayrides, and chose from an enormous assortment of food — everything from paella to grilled lamb to kettle corn.Children rode burlap sacks down a large slide, scaled a rock climbing tower, got their faces painted, and played with play dough and blocks.A brief heavy rain midway through the picnic drove most attendees under tents, but very few to their cars.Percy King, a federal clerk for the Middle District in Jacksonville, was one of many students, attorneys, and judges who traveled from all over the state to the picnic. He returned after attending the event each year he was a law student at Florida A&M University.“Just being able to walk around and talk to other people who had reached where I wanted to be already was a really, really good experience,” he said. “This year I wanted to come and basically give back what they’ve done for us.”Julian Jackson-Fannin, a federal clerk for the Southern District, also returned after having attended as a FAMU law student.“Every year it’s a wonderful experience,” he said. “I’m glad to see that it’s grown and more and more people are participating. I still think, particularly among federal clerks or even on the state level, diversity is needed desperately.”Pettis echoed Jackson-Fannin’s sentiments.“Diversity and inclusion is one of our objectives of the Bar,” Pettis said. “This is an effort that really accomplishes that. I think we need to make sure this entry-level connection between law student and Bar is not just on the front end but something that’s integrated throughout the practice of law, that we’re keeping people connected across all sectors. I think if we’re able to accomplish that, it’s a healthier Bar for us all.”Amid the hustle and bustle of the event, Kozyak mused about how much it’s grown over the past decade.“It makes me feel really proud because 10 years ago, my wife, partner, and I were cooking hamburgers and serving 200 people,” he said. “Now we’ve grown to 15 to 20 times that and have students coming in from everywhere.”The picnic is designed to make two important goals easy: connecting law students with mentors and celebrating diversity.“Students and young lawyers could not find a better place in the country to meet lawyers,” he said. “You can walk up to a judge in a pair of shorts or a senior partner from Greenburg Traurig playing volleyball. You could never do that at a Bar event because they’d be surrounded by other senior lawyers and doing their own hustling.”Aside from a $10 parking fee, attendees enjoy the festivities for free.Among the dozens of sponsor tents, Kozyak pointed out the Florida Muslim Bar Association, the Caribbean Bar Association, and the Miami-Dade Gay and Lesbian Chamber of Commerce.“I hope everyone attending can see how valuable diversity is,” he said. “This shows we can all get along and have fun. I hope everyone will be a little more sensitive and if you see someone from the Muslim Bar Association wearing traditional head garb, you don’t go, ‘Wow, that’s weird,’ and instead you go ‘Wow, that’s cool!’” December 1, 2013 Associate Editor Regular Newscenter_img Find out what the president is working on via Facebook and Twitter.last_img read more

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