Desert Trip, AKA “Oldchella,” Just Added a Second Weekend Filled with…

first_imgMusicDesert Trip, AKA “Oldchella,” Just Added a Second Weekend Filled with Bomb Classic Rock PerformancesCatch Bob Dylan, the Rolling Stones, and moreBy Jessica P. Ogilvie – May 9, 2016705ShareEmailFacebookTwitterPinterestReddItTwo groups of Southern California music festival-lovers already have weekends devoted to their favorite artists: Coachella for the hipsters, and Stagecoach for the country music contingent. Now, Desert Trip — lovingly nicknamed “Oldchella”—has added a second weekend to their inaugural festival, so that everyone’s parents (and also lovers of classic rock, age notwithstanding) can have their time in the sun.Desert Trip was formally announced for October 9-11, 2016 last week, with headliners including the Rolling Stones, Neil Young and Bob Dylan. As of today, the festival announced that many the same acts will perform encores the following weekend, thanks to huge demand for tickets.In addition to the bands, the food and wine selection at Desert Trip promises to be an upgrade from the carnival-like offerings at Coachella and Stagecoach. Described as “culinary experiences” on the festival’s website, those cooking up dishes include Dominique Ansel, Michael Voltaggio and Ludo Lefebvre. Greg Koch will handle the craft beer selection, and Cedd Moses and the Houston Brothers will design a cocktail program.In other words, Desert Trip might in fact feature the best that L.A. has to offer. Start saving your paycheck now. TAGSThe Rolling StonesOldchellaDesert TripBob DylanPrevious articleWTF Was Up With That Ending of The Good Wife?Next articleAll 34 Snacks in Our Office’s New Vending Machine, RankedJessica P. Ogilvie RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORSong Catalogs Are Selling for Big Bucks, but Will the Trend End on a Bum Note?On His 39th Studio Album, Bob Dylan Grapples with His Own MythologyMick Jagger Is Sly as a Shady Art Dealer in ‘The Burnt Orange Heresy’last_img read more

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UK is home to Europe’s highest number of million-euro banker salaries

first_img Share The UK has Europe’s highest proportion of bankers who take home a pay packet of €1m (£730,000) or more, according to new figures from the European Banking Authority (EBA).  The number of bankers earning this sum as a combination of salary and bonuses in the UK was 2,086 in 2013. The next highest was Germany, where 397 individuals earned this much – a fraction of the UK’s figure.   Read more: London has more billionaires than any other city in the world It was not just in 2013 that this was the case, either – the UK consistently came way in the lead for generous salaries in 2011 and 2012, too. In all cases, this meant the proportion of “high earners” relative to lower-earning employees far exceeded any other country. That said, the overall number of bankers taking home €1m or more across Europe is declining, with the total EU figure falling from 3,530 in 2012 to 3,178 to 2013. Read more: More billionaires born in London than any other European city According to the EBA, the fall reflected “a number of factors, including movements in the exchange rate between the euro and the pound sterling”. It also blamed profitability: “Overall in 2013 profitability was significantly reduced in many institutions compared with 2012. Consequently the average net profit per staff member was reduced in 2013.” The EBA’s figures come from before tough new regulatory rules were imposed on bankers at the start of this year. Designed to crack down on bad banker behaviour, they cap an individual’s annual bonus at twice the value of their salary.  Monday 7 September 2015 4:40 pm UK is home to Europe’s highest number of million-euro banker salaries whatsapp whatsapp Sarah Spickernell center_img Show Comments ▼ by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMoneyPailShe Was A Star, Now She Works In ScottsdaleMoneyPailSwift VerdictChrissy Metz, 39, Shows Off Massive Weight Loss In Fierce New PhotoSwift VerdictPost FunKate & Meghan Are Very Different Mothers, These Photos Prove ItPost FunMoguldom NationFather Of 2 Sues Los Angeles Hospital After Wife Dies During ChildbirthMoguldom NationComedyAbandoned Submarines Floating Around the WorldComedyMaternity WeekA Letter From The Devil Written By A Possessed Nun In 1676 Has Been TranslatedMaternity WeekGameday NewsNBA Wife Turns Heads Wherever She GoesGameday NewsEquity MirrorThey Drained Niagara Falls — They Weren’t Prepared For This Sickening DiscoveryEquity Mirrorzenherald.comMeghan Markle Changed This Major Detail On Archies Birth Certificatezenherald.com More From Our Partners Florida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comInstitutional Investors Turn To Options to Bet Against AMCvaluewalk.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgWhite House Again Downplays Fourth Possible Coronvirus Checkvaluewalk.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgKamala Harris keeps list of reporters who don’t ‘understand’ her: reportnypost.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.org Tags: NULLlast_img read more

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Premium / Supply chain radar: DSV Panalpina – up, up and away…

first_img LOGIN Email* << Go back Please either REGISTER or login below to continue Password* Please Login Subscription required for Premium stories In order to view the entire article please login with a valid subscription below or register an account and subscribe to Premium Forgotten your password? Please click here Email* Premium subscriber LOGIN While I am reassured by DSV insiders that, as expected, there is a lot of work to be done at this stage of the Panalpina integration, and that it’s “complicated” but “it will get done”, the stock market performance of the combined entity continues to leave us all in awe.On Thursday, DSV PAN stock closed only a whisker away (0.3%) from its previous record high of about Dkr774 ($116.1). The punctuality with which strength materialises to render weakness a sporadic ... New Premium subscriber REGISTER By Alessandro Pasetti 17/01/2020 Reset Your Password Resetlast_img read more

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Physicians need to openly discuss medical mistakes and near misses

first_img By Sara Scarlet July 14, 2017 Reprints Sara Scarlet Like many surgical problems, compartment syndrome must be recognized rapidly. Failing to do so may lead to a patient’s losing function in a limb, losing the limb altogether, and, in extreme cases, dying. A physician-in-training I work with missed it. Her error made me realize that medicine is suffering from its own largely unrecognized compartment syndrome.Late one night, an emergency physician at an outside hospital called the attending physician on my hospital’s burn surgery service about a patient whose arm had been badly burned. After a brief discussion, they agreed to transfer the patient to our hospital. The trainee admitted the patient to the hospital.Somehow, the emergency medicine physician, the burn surgeon on call, the nurses, and the trainee all missed the harbingers of compartment syndrome — the tight burned skin, the fixed deformity of the hand, and the severe pain the patient was experiencing. This dangerous condition occurs when pressure inside a confined body space builds up as a result of internal bleeding or swelling. The increase in pressure prevents blood from flowing to the area. If compartment syndrome isn’t detected in time and treated, the limb can become permanently damaged, or may even need to be amputated.advertisement Creating a safe environment for discussing errors will help future physicians succeed where others have failed. It will help improve our health care systems, create a culture of safety, and work to eliminate the damaging culture of stigma.The standard morbidity and mortality (M&M) conference is supposed to offer clinicians a public forum for presenting medical errors and complications. But these tend to cultivate an atmosphere of detachment — trainees impersonally convey details with an attitude of indifference. The M&M conference generally doesn’t offer the opportunity for discussing what lies deeper.Debriefing represents an excellent step forward. The purpose of this exercise is to discuss the actions and thought processes surrounding a specific patient care situation, to reflect on them, and to incorporate improvement into future performance. The debrief can be an effective forum for addressing the personal toll of experiencing a serious event.But I’ve found that in the absence of a sentinel event — an unexpected death or serious injury — debriefing is rare. When the dust settles after an error is made or a patient experiences a complication, we often scurry back to our tasks and deal with the psychological aftershocks alone.Vulnerability is an integral aspect of leadership, something that all physicians should acknowledge. With vulnerability comes strength. From the novice trainee to the most seasoned surgeon, we must all recognize that putting an end to our silent solidarity about errors will empower us to provide better care for our patients, for each other, and for ourselves.The nature of our practice and the fact that we are human beings means that we will make mistakes. Bad doctors aren’t the only doctors who make errors; rather, they are the ones who refuse to learn from their mistakes. As many of us in surgery say, “The enemy of good is perfect.”Sara Scarlet, M.D., is a general surgery resident at the University of North Carolina. Medical culture encourages doctors to avoid admitting mistakes @sarascarletMD What many trainees fail to recognize early in their careers is that errors usually aren’t the fault of a single clinician. Instead, they represent the failure of a much larger system of defenses, barriers, and safeguards. In the case of our patient with compartment syndrome, the error was on behalf of the entire medical team.I shared with the trainee a story of a mistake of mine two years earlier but still vivid in my mind. A patient of mine developed critical limb ischemia — a rapid reduction in blood flow to one of her legs. In order to properly treat her, we planned to perform an angiogram, a procedure to look at the arteries in her leg. I gave her a dose of heparin to prevent her blood from clotting without taking the time to check the results of her previous blood tests. Had I looked, I would have seen that she had been given a dose of heparin the previous day. The extra dose I administered triggered a stroke. I felt extremely responsible for it, and did not leave her bedside for hours to make sure she received the appropriate care.The next day, the patient thanked me for “my compassion,” her words hanging in the air in the busy intensive care unit. I had never felt so ashamed. Now I recognized the same painful feelings in my young colleague.Most doctors vividly recall their “cases of regret.” These events undeniably shape our practice. As French surgeon René Leriche wrote in 1951, “Every surgeon carries about him a little cemetery, in which from time to time he goes to pray, a cemetery of bitterness and regret, of which he seeks the reason for certain of his failures.”Most of these regrets are quite private. As Dr. Danielle Ofri reflected in her essay “My Near Miss” on her experiences with errors, “the instinct for most medical professionals is to keep these shameful mistakes to ourselves.” They do this in part to protect themselves. According to the 2013 National Healthcare Quality Report, most health care workers believe that mistakes will be held against them.Like compartment syndrome, failing to openly discuss errors carries with it the deep, unrelenting pain of guilt, humiliation, and shame. Left unaddressed, these powerful emotions are damaging to our professional and personal lives. In addition, failure to openly acknowledge personal experiences with errors and near misses contributes to a culture of stigma. This kind of avoidance led my colleague to believe that she was the only trainee who had made a mistake, which instilled in her a deep sense of regret and shame.Keeping medical mistakes in the shadows is bad for individual clinicians and for the medical system, since we can all learn from mistakes. So how do we discuss them with the people who support and mentor us as we navigate through training and beyond? More specifically, how do we communicate how our mistakes make us feel?We often discuss the appropriate ways to disclose errors to patients: apologize, be honest, and accept responsibility for one’s mistakes. But the medical culture fails to provide an effective platform for us to discuss errors with one another on a more personal level. My first patient died. How I learned to forgive myself Tags educationhospitalspatientsphysicians About the Author Reprintscenter_img Fortunately, she escaped permanent damage and eventually left the hospital with normal function in her arm — what we in medicine call a “near miss.”The next time the trainee was working in the hospital, I sent her a page to call me so we could debrief.Her voice cracked nervously as she said hello. We exchanged the usual pleasantries. Her next words came as a shock. “Are you calling to yell at me?”“No,” I said, “we need to talk about how we can all do better next time.”We discussed the details of the case and reviewed compartment syndrome. I thought the conversation was going well. But then the intern surprised me by asking, “Am I going to get fired?”That fearful question echoed the hidden curriculum of punitive responses to error that pervades the culture of medicine. It’s especially strong in surgery, where we tend to work apart from peers. With that isolation, it is easy to assume that others are somehow infallible, and that our personal errors are egregiously unique. Failing to recognize the urgency of the situation, the trainee didn’t wake me to discuss the case. Instead, she waited until the day team arrived to discuss the patient. That meant her condition went unrecognized for several hours and her care was significantly delayed. First OpinionPhysicians need to openly discuss medical mistakes and near misses We must all recognize that putting an end to our silent solidarity about errors will empower us to provide better care. I learned about the case that morning. Devastated by the number of clinicians who had missed the warning signs, I imagined the patient lying in her hospital bed with agonizing pain in her arm as it was starved of oxygen.advertisement APStock Related: Related:last_img read more

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Fort Myers man who feeds neighbors free food receives outpouring of support

first_imgWATCH: Fort Myers lotto looter on the run with stacks of scratchers June 16, 2021 RELATEDTOPICS AdvertisementTags: Fort MyersStory2Share FORT MYERS, Fla. – Carlton Crabbe is not usually at a loss for words, but the response he received after NBC2 aired a Story2Share on his efforts to feed his neighborhood has left him speechless.The Fort Myers man has been cooking food from his driveway and giving it away for free to people nearby in need.Crabbe’s story was shared on NBC affiliates across the country and has resulted in thousands of dollars in donations pouring in from as far as Virginia and South Carolina.“I broke down and cried,” Crabbe said of the support. He is now planning a Thanksgiving feast next week and plans to keep cooking as long as he can. By Tualatin Valley AdvertisementDC Young Fly knocks out heckler (video) – Rolling OutRead more6 comments’Mortal Kombat’ Exceeded Expectations Says WarnerMedia ExecutiveRead more2 commentsDo You Remember Bob’s Big Boy?Read more1 commentsKISS Front Man Paul Stanley Reveals This Is The End Of KISS As A Touring Band, For RealRead more1 comments Dealer found guilty for selling drugs in Fort Myers June 17, 2021 Sponsored Content No matter which adventure you choose, these are just five of the top things to do in Oregon this summer. You’re…center_img Thief scoops up tip jar at Fort Myers ice cream shop June 16, 2021 Advertisement AdvertisementCrabbe offers meals to anyone who needs one Monday-Friday from his San Carlos Park driveway.If you would like to make a donation to Crabbe, you can send one to the following address:Carlton Crabbe8362 San Carlos Blvd.Ft. Myers FL 33967 AdvertisementRecommended ArticlesBrie Larson Reportedly Replacing Robert Downey Jr. As The Face Of The MCURead more81 commentsGal Gadot Reportedly Being Recast As Wonder Woman For The FlashRead more29 comments Former NYPD officer finds unexpected joy patrolling Fort Myers elementary school June 17, 2021 Top 5 Things to Do in Oregon This Summer Advertisementlast_img read more

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Harvest ETF begins trading

first_img Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Oakville, Ont.-based Harvest Portfolios Group Inc. has completed the initial offering of Class A units of Harvest Banks & Buildings Leaders Income ETF, pursuant to a prospectus dated Jan. 26.The units began trading on the Toronto Stock Exchange on Thursday under the ticker symbol HCBB. Leah Golob The fund’s investment objectives are to create monthly income and maximize total returns by investing mainly in a portfolio of banking issuers, other financial issuers and real estate related to companies and real estate investment trusts listed on a recognized stock exchange in North America.“We want to provide our Canadian investors with convenient and lower cost access to our running income strategy,” says Michael Kovacs, president and CEO of Harvest, in a statement. “The new ETF is based on the Harvest Banks & Buildings Income mutual fund, a popular strategy designed in 2009, for investors seeking income and potential capital appreciation.” Companies Harvest Portfolios Group Inc. Businessman hand showing financial report on table nonwarit/123RF Facebook LinkedIn Twitterlast_img read more

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Trees Planted at Mineral Heights Primary

first_imgRelatedTrees Planted at Mineral Heights Primary FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Some 30 trees were planted at the Mineral Heights Primary School in Clarendon on October 3, World Tree Planting Day, as part of activities to mark ALCOA’s Worldwide Month of Service, celebrated annually during October.The Jamalco team, assisted by the school’s Cub Scouts, Brownies, and Environmentalists, planted the 30 trees at strategic points on the school’s compound, where they will serve to provide shade, food or beautification for the institution.Jamalco team leader, Silvio Porter, said the experience was an interesting one, which demonstrated the benefits that could be derived when there is a co-operative effort.Principal of the school, Dalton Sharp, told JIS News that the school is generally involved in efforts, which are geared toward the preservation of the environment. He added that the Ministry of Education has mandated that schools across the island participate in this activity, in a conscious effort to instil in young Jamaicans the all-important role each must play to slow down the rate of deterioration of the environment. He expressed gratitude to Jamalco for assisting in this regard.During October each year, ALCOA celebrates a month of service at its 200 locations across the world, including Jamalco. This year’s activities are being observed under the theme: ‘ALCOA in the community: People making a difference’.As a result, 150 Jamalco workers will plant 200 trees, refurbish community facilities, and take part in various outreach activities to better the lives of thousands of Jamaicans, particularly in its operating areas. The company projects that by the end of 2008, some 5,000 trees will have been planted. Trees Planted at Mineral Heights Primary UncategorizedOctober 8, 2008 RelatedTrees Planted at Mineral Heights Primarycenter_img RelatedTrees Planted at Mineral Heights Primary Advertisementslast_img read more

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Cutting stamp duty and other charges are wise moves in these tough times

first_imgCutting stamp duty and other charges are wise moves in these tough times HoldmarkSydney November 18, 2020 — Giving home buyers the choice today to axe stamp duties when they buy a property will provide a major incentive for new projects and spur buyers back into the market, Holdmark’s Founder and CEO Mr Sarkis Nassif said today.“I agree with the NSW Government that its latest Budget initiative will have an ongoing effect on the market, for many years to come because it will reduce the cost of buying a home.“This is the type of forward thinking that our communities require if they are to emerge quickly from the COVID recession and move into a phase of sustainable growth”, he saidThe boost was paired today with a further lift in the payroll tax threshold to $1.2 million. It had been lifted to $1 million in May of this year. The payroll tax rate has been reduced for two years from 1 July from 5.45 per cent to 4.85 per cent.“Combined these cuts will give businesses a saving of an estimated $2.4 billion, which is an extremely useful fill-up for the industry. Every dollar helps to lift our industry and support our communities”, Mr Nassif said today. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Dollar, Effect, Government, home buyer, industry, market, NSW, payroll tax, property, recession, stamp duty, sustainable, taxlast_img read more

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IOM Council UK statement

first_imgIOM Council UK statement Thank you, Chair.I’d like to begin by congratulating you on your new appointment, and thanking Morten Jesperson for his chairmanship of the Bureau over the past year.2020 has been a particularly memorable year, and in many senses one that most of us will be glad to end. As the effects of COVID-19 were added to a global record humanitarian need, threats are posed to the lives, livelihoods and well-being of more people than ever. Responding to this has been a huge challenge. An effective, coordinated, capable, visible and accountable IOM is needed now more than ever and, whilst our first thoughts are with those who need IOM assistance, we express our gratitude to the whole team at the IOM for their continuing good work.Given those challenges it is both remarkable and essential that the IOM is able to continue reforming. As the second largest donor, the United Kingdom stands ready to support the IOM on this journey. The UK would like to reiterate its support to the Director General, the Deputy Director General and IOM staff for continuing to reform the IOM as the organisation, and the importance of its work, continues to expand.The UK welcomes the creation of the additional Deputy Director General position. This is the right step to recognise the growing size and importance of the organisation and the demands upon the leadership team. The UK is a strong supporter of the Internal Governance Framework, and we keenly welcome the work plan which we know will be treated as a priority and actioned as quickly and efficiently as possible.We also welcome IOM’s efforts to play a full role in a more joined-up international system. Since becoming a UN related organisation in 2016, the IOM’s role has grown, and so too has its responsibility – to better coordinate its work with other UN agencies and partners and to take a more outward-facing approach.Furthermore, although the UK notes the improvement in the staffing and capacity of the Office of the Inspector General, we remain concerned regarding the increased number of allegations the office is receiving and the office’s ability to deal with such a growing workload. We appreciate the regular quarterly updates and request these continue. We expect senior management to maintain a clear and specific focus on the OIG – including on its ability to carry out its function in preventing sexual exploitation and abuse. The UK was pleased to be a member of the Audit Oversight and Advisory Committee selection panel, underlining the importance we attach to these issues.[The UK reaffirms its commitment to the Global Compact on Migration, and is pleased to recognise the UN’s hard work since signature to translate GCM principles into action that helps migrants. We believe this work is beginning to show promising results and we encourage IOM to continue and to strengthen its valuable work in this area. We welcome the progress establishing the Start Up Fund, to which the UK is pleased to contribute, and its first projects being approved. We also welcome the establishment of the UN Migration Network and its associated networks. This month’s Review of implementation in Europe and North America was a valuable opportunity to reflect on our own progress and to hear from others. As the GCM begins to mature and the institutional architecture takes shape, we look forward to further progress and encourage IOM to maintain its ambition in this area.]Finally, I would like to highlight one more key issue. On 2 September, the UK Foreign Secretary, Dominic Raab, announced a call to action to protect the world’s poorest from the increasing threat of famine, and a new £119 million aid package to alleviate extreme hunger. The UK has appointed its first Special Envoy for Famine Prevention and Humanitarian Affairs to work in partnership with other donors, UN agencies, NGOs and foundations to help prevent catastrophic famine.We look forward to working in partnership with the IOM on all of these issues.Thank you. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:america, architecture, council, covid-19, Europe, famine, Government, Humanitarian, migrants, migration, North America, reform, Secretary, sexual exploitation, UK, UK Government, United Kingdomlast_img read more

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A medical blueprint for when next coronavirus strikes

first_imgA medical blueprint for when next coronavirus strikes Monash LensProfessor Carl Kirkpatrick has helped edit a new collection of research papers largely focused on COVID-19 and what happens next. The start-point for society, and healthcare, he says, is that something similar will reoccur. He can even estimate when.Carl KirkpatrickProfessor, Centre for Medicine Use and Safety“In eight to 10 years, there will very likely be another novel [new] virus,” says the Monash University pharmaceutical scientist. “We’ve had SARS-COV1 [SARS, 2003], H1N1 [Swine Flu, 2009], MERS-COV [Camel Flu, 2012], and now COVID-19. This current virus will change again, or it may be a different coronavirus, or another novel respiratory virus.”At the onset of the COVID pandemic, he says, there was no industry, regulatory or government guidance “to help researchers, drug developers, clinicians and policymakers determine the best pathways to either repurpose existing medicines or swiftly develop new medicines to treat people with COVID infections”.The way forwardThe research papers published in the prestigious British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology are, he says, a blueprint for the way forward in the development and repurposing of medicines for respiratory virus patients in the post-COVID era. Currently, there are vaccines but no useful therapies. In the future, these new or existing drugs (or a combination of both) look likely to be used for patients or when vaccines don’t work.“They are the guidelines for the next coronavirus, next respiratory virus, or the next pandemic that comes out,” he says. “These are the guidance documents we desperately needed in early 2020 – a ‘cookbook’, if you will, of what we need to do, and in hindsight, what we could have done better.”Tracking the life cycle of a virusProfessor Kirkpatrick leads the pharmacometrics research program at Monash’s Centre for Medicine Use and Safety. He’s co-edited the journal’s special edition and contributed papers, as a co-author, examining COVID-19’s highly problematic life cycle. The study was funded by the Gates Foundation and completed in partnership with Certara, a global drug development company.Professor Kirkpatrick’s specific area of expertise is viral kinetic modelling, where infections, the journey of a virus in the body, the inflammation caused, and the ability of the drug to stop or reduce viral replication by medicines are mathematically mapped.His pharmacological and mathematical examination of COVID-19 and potential future pandemics began almost 10 years ago with the influenza drug oseltamivir, or Tamiflu. The modelling work undertaken was then used as a blueprint to map a fictional pandemic.“The questions we were answering then were, what would we need to do to shut a pandemic down, and how many people would we need to treat, and at what dose of oseltamivir,” he says.Then, still pre-COVID, he was involved in another project on early-phase development of lumictabine for the acute children’s virus RSV, or respiratory syncytial syndrome, which enabled greater insights into the time course of viral replication, and how to optimise drug therapy.“Treatment needs to be something that can knock the viral load down as quickly as possible, along with other medications that can then mop up that inflammatory soup in the respiratory and other tissues.”In January last year, COVID-19 hit – and much of this previous work on respiratory viral loads in people, and the life and death of respiratory viruses, was about to come in extremely handy.Professor Kirkpatrick’s collaborator, Dr Craig Rayner (president of Integrated Drug Development at Certara in the United States), was immediately seconded to a World Health Organisation taskforce. The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation funded the COVID-19 Pharmacology Resource Centre /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:British, clinical pharmacology, coronavirus, drug development, Government, health, healthcare, inflammation, Monash, Monash University, pharmacology, Professor, United States, university, viral load, World Health Organisationlast_img read more

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