Monopoly 1979-2011

first_imgMonopoly, the horse Beth Underhill rode at the 1992 Barcelona Olympic Games, died on November 16 at the age of 32.  Monopoly earned more than $1 million in prize money throughout his illustrious show jumping career, and was inducted into the Jump Canada Hall of Fame in 2008. Email* SIGN UP “I swear, by the end, I didn’t even have to steer,” laughed Underhill of competing in the Shell Cup Derby, where the course remains the same each year.  “He loved the crowd at Spruce Meadows and he loved that course!  Even though he had competed around the world, Spruce Meadows truly was where he felt the most at home. Underhill and Monopoly’s partnership was as remarkable for its longevity as for its success. “I would really like to thank the Ierullo family for the opportunity to ride the horse and to keep Monopoly though his retirement,” acknowledged Underhill.  “They were a big part of his life and his career.  I was riding for Torchy at the time and he put the horse in my direction, which was a nice thing to do considering he was still competing himself at the time.  Marion Atkinson was his groom throughout the majority of his career.  Pippa Stanley and Jerome Caron made his retirement exceedingly special.  He knew his people and he knew who he felt comfortable with.  I don’t think there are many horses that enjoyed their retirement as much as Monopoly did.  He was an integral part of our lives.” Tags: Beth Underhill, Monopoly, “For me, it was such a special accomplishment to make the Canadian Equestrian Team; that had been my goal since I was a little girl,” said Underhill.  “That first year I was riding him was very special.  Not only had I obtained a lifelong dream, but we really grew together as partners.  We went double clear in our first Nations’ Cup in Washington, and then came home to win the Nations’ Cup in Toronto at the Royal.” “He was a sensitive horse; you had to earn his trust,” she continued of Monopoly’s character.  “Once he trusted you, he would go to the ends of the earth for you and try his heart out.  He always tried his best.” Bred by Mr. J.A. Cottle, Monopoly was born in New Zealand in 1979.  A registered Hannoverian, Monopoly’s sire was Witzbold while his thoroughbred dam was Suzy by Abridge Member.  Discovered by Canadian Olympian Jay Hayes in New Zealand, Monopoly was imported to Canada by the Ierullo family, and was donated to the Canadian Equestrian Team in 1993.  After 10 years competing at the grand prix level and earning more than $1 million in prize money, Monopoly was retired at Beth Underhill Stables in Schomberg, ON, where he continued to be a large presence in the barn. “He really made my career, he started everything,” said Underhill, who became the first woman to win the Canadian World Cup League in 1993.  “He was my first grand prix horse and allowed me to ride on the team for the first time.  He won his last grand prix at the age of 20.  For a horse to be jumping at that age was remarkable.  There wasn’t another horse like him.” Of the impact Monopoly had on her life, Underhill reflected, “It was in 1989 when I first started riding him, so he was in my life for 22 years.  When you think of all the things that happen in your life over 22 years, he was there throughout the highs and the lows.  I shared so many aspects of my life with him.  He truly was a member of my family.” We’ll send you our regular newsletter and include you in our monthly giveaways. PLUS, you’ll receive our exclusive Rider Fitness digital edition with 15 exercises for more effective riding. Horse Sport Enewscenter_img “He had a routine that could not be changed – his feeding routine, his turn-out routine – he had to go to the same paddock every day,” continued Underhill, noting that although Monopoly allowed her pet goat to visit him from time to time, he did not like having any other turn-out friends in his paddock.  “He was a loner.  He liked his own space, he had his own way of doing things, and he didn’t like change at all!  He made it quite clear how he liked things to be.” Over the course of their 10-year competition career, Underhill and Monopoly were stalwarts of the Canadian Equestrian Team.  Partnered together by trainer Terrance ‘Torchy’ Millar in 1989, Underhill and Monopoly made their Canadian Show Jumping Team debut the following year on the fall indoor Nations’ Cup tour comprised of Washington, New York, and Toronto’s Royal Horse Show. “He did everything on his own terms,” said Underhill.  “Even in his retirement, he was still a very busy horse.  He stall was located in the center of the action.  He liked to put his head completely out of his stall so he could nip at the dogs and boss the other horses around as they moved throughout the barn.  He felt he had an important job in the whole mechanism of how the stable ran.  He enjoyed being top horse in the barn. Even at 32 years of age, which is well past the average life expectancy of a horse, Monopoly was very active and fit. Following their successful Canadian Equestrian Team debut, Underhill and Monopoly represented Canada at the 1991 Pan American Games in Havana, Cuba, winning both team and individual silver medals.  At the 2011 Jump Canada Hall of Fame Gala, Underhill and her teammates Sandra Anderson, Danny Foster, and Ian Millar were inducted in recognition of their achievements at those Pan American Games. Over the course of their career together, Underhill and Monopoly traveled around the world, competing at the 1992 Olympic Games in Barcelona, Spain, and the 1994 World Equestrian Games in The Hague, The Netherlands, where they finished 14th individually.  While the pair enjoyed major grand prix victories throughout North America, Spruce Meadows was Monopoly’s favourite place to compete.  In 1994 and 1996, the pair claimed the Canadian Show Jumping Championship title and, in 1992, placed third in the $680,000 du Maurier Ltd. International (now the $1 million CN International) at the Calgary venue.  In 1996, having finished second the previous three years in a row, Underhill and Monopoly finally won the $100,000 Shell Cup Derby. Underhill and Monopoly enjoyed one of the longest partnerships in show jumping sport.  Underhill first began riding Monopoly when he was 10 years old, and the pair enjoyed their last major grand prix victory, the $100,000 Treatwells Grand Prix held at HITS Ocala, FL, in 1999 when Monopoly was 20. “I had been watching him carefully as he got older, and he was still a sound, healthy horse,” said Underhill.  “The day he died, he went out to the paddock and was trotting around.  They were bringing him back into the barn when he had a heart attack.  He was a remarkable horse, and a remarkable character.  Monopoly was very special, and I feel grateful that I was able to have him in my life for as long as I did.” Monopoly was cremated and will be buried at Underhill’s farm beside her other memorable grand prix mount, Altair, who died in 2006 at the age of 18. Subscribe to the Horse Sport newsletter and get an exclusive bonus digital edition! More from Horse Sport:Christilot Boylen Retires From Team SportAfter an exemplary career as one of Canada’s top Dressage riders, seven-time Olympian Christilot Boylen has announced her retirement from team competition.2020 Royal Agricultural Winter Fair CancelledFor only the second time in its history, The Royal Agricultural Winter Fair has been cancelled but plans are being made for some virtual competitions.Royal Agricultural Winter Fair Statement on 2020 EventAs the Province of Ontario starts to reopen, The Royal’s Board and staff will adhere to all recommendations put forward by government and health officials.Government Financial Assistance for Ontario FarmersOntario Equestrian has recently released this update of several financial assistance packages available, including those for farm business.last_img read more

Read More »

Unprecedented Drought in Crimea: Can the Russian-Occupied Peninsula Solve Its Water Problems Without Ukraine?

first_imgThe weather in July brought rain to Crimea—but still not enough to save the peninsula from its severe multi-year drought. That same month, the volume of freshwater in Crimea’s reservoirs decreased by almost 8.5 million cubic meters. By August, the amount of reservoir water left totaled around 75 million cubic meters, compared to 164 million last year (Crimea.kp.ru, August 3).Crimea’s water problem is not a novelty. Due to relatively low annual average precipitation levels and a poor river network, chronic freshwater shortages have been an acute predicament for centuries. The first attempt to resolve this problem came after the drought of 1833, when Finnish-born Russian botanist Christian Steven proposed building a canal from the Dnipro River to Crimea. The idea only came to fruition nearly 130 years later. In 1961, Soviet authorities began construction of the North Crimean Canal, which, after a few years, started delivering some of the Dnipro’s water to the peninsula. Despite the fact that the canal did not solve Crimea’s water problem completely, it satisfied 85 percent of the peninsula’s needs when it came to drinking water, irrigation and industrial use (Istpravda.com.ua, May 13, 2014).Following Russia’s forcible annexation of Crimea in 2014, Ukraine blocked the canal, but Moscow promised to find a new fix; it never did. Six years on, the peninsula risks drying up completely. This past July, the water levels at Crimea’s main reservoirs, including Bilogirske and Taigan, dropped drastically. According to Reshad Memedov, an activist of the Free Crimea movement, these reservoirs could dry up completely in the fall. At the same time, the Chornorichechne reservoir in Sevastopol is rapidly shallowing, while the surface area of the city’s largest freshwater reservoir—Chorna River—has shrunk significantly. The usually deep-water Biyuk-Karasu River is now only a stream. Meanwhile, the rivers Baga, Armanka and Uzundzha and the small tributaries of the Chorna River have all completely dried up (Blackseanews.net, August 3). Due to high summer temperatures and a lack of precipitation, the salinity levels of water reserves on the peninsula have also spiked dramatically: Kyrleutske Lake, in northern Crimea is now 14 times saltier than the Black Sea. In lakes with lower salt concentrations, observers have noticed intensive development of green multicellular algae (Vesti92.ru, July 8).The water infrastructure in Crimea is steadily collapsing, and the soil degradation process in the northern part of the peninsula is already creating serious ecological issues (Agroday.com.ua, March 15, 2018). Since 70 percent of North Crimean Canal water was used for agriculture, the Ukrainian blockade dramatically affected that sector (Openforest.org.ua, June 6, 2020). Not only has the total area of Crimea’s irrigated land decreased ten times during the last six years, but the excessive use of underground water for irrigation has accelerated soil salinization, making the land unsuitable for agriculture. As a result, northern Crimea, the most farming-intensive region of the peninsula, has begun to undergo desertification (Nezavisimaya Gazeta, January 28).Apart from that, the quality and quantity of Crimeans’ drinking water has worsened as well. According to Oleksandr Liev, the former Ukrainian minister of tourism and resorts of the Autonomous Republic of Crimea, as of 2020 the problem of insufficient water supplies has become critical. Notably, high levels of mineralization of artesian well water have made it undrinkable. More than 200 wells have already been sealed. Due to the drought, water in many Crimean settlements, including Simferopol, is supplied only several hours a day (Blackseanews.net, July 30). The situation in rural areas is even more alarming. People have absolutely nothing to drink: the wells have dried up, and the central water supply system, promised by the authorities, has not yet been built. The only ones not experiencing water scarcity in Crimea are, apparently, local officials, oligarchs and the Russian military (Novaya Gazeta, July 19). Even though the peninsula’s own resources can provide more than 500 million cubic meters of water annually, outdated infrastructure causes enormous problems. Fifty-six and a half percent of the 14,000 kilometers of Crimea’s waterways need to be repaired. In 2019, 47 percent of drinking water was lost during its transportation, but only 1 percent of the water supply system was repaired that year (Openforest.org.ua, June 6).On July 24, the self-proclaimed prime minister of occupied Crimea, Sergey Aksyonov, confirmed the desperate situation and did not rule out the possibility that the Russian government would classify the water scarcity threat in Crimea as an emergency situation (Allcrimea.net, July 24). Due to the critical conditions in Simferopol, Aksyonov was forced to ask for help from the Russian military. Over 300 service members from the Southern and Western military districts laid more than 50 kilometers of temporary aboveground water pipelines. According to Aksyonov, these new pipes will transfer up to 50,000 cubic meters of water from Taigan to the reservoirs of Simferopol (Rossyiskaya Gazeta, July 13). But already on July 31, one of the quickly and haphazardly laid pipes ruptured (Blackseanews.net, July 31).The Crimean authorities are contemplating any and all ideas to deal with the drought: from artificial rain to building water pipelines from Kuban. But the effectiveness of such plans is questionable. Many experts believe the situation in Crimea can only be resolved by regaining access to the Dnipro River (RBC, June 20). The Ukrainian government, however, is not ready to restart the flow of water to the peninsula. Oleksiy Danilov, the current secretary of the Ukrainian National Security and Defense Council, asserted that Ukraine has “no moral right” to resume supplies to Russia-occupied Crimea. Likewise, Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba stressed that Kyiv would not supply water even in exchange for Russia’s release of Ukrainian prisoners held on the peninsula (Crimea.ria.ru, July 10).Since further water scarcity in Crimea could provoke Russia to choose a military option to resolve the problem, this “battle for water” is a pressing challenge for Ukrainian national security (see EDM, February 26, May 21, June 29). But former acting deputy head of the Ukrainian Presidential Administration, Andriy Senchenko, believes that the blocked North Crimean Canal is a major strategic advantage and geopolitical instrument for Kyiv (Glavcom.ua, July 28). Ukraine will need to use this instrument wisely while, at the same time, hardening its vulnerable southern flank in preparation for any military actions or “hybrid” threats from Russia.last_img read more

Read More »

Students mingle, embrace community at ‘Multicultural Mixer’ event

first_imgThe Office of Multicultural Services (OMS) at Saint Mary’s hosted an open house mixer event Monday in its office.Director of Student Involvement and Multicultural Services Gloria Jenkins said she wants her office to feel like a welcoming space for all students.“A lot of students are not connecting on campus,” she said. “I want them to know this is a place they can come to meet people, make friends and find a way to get involved on campus. It’s somewhere to hang out.”Jenkins said her office partners with various student groups and other offices to plan events and programming, including Belles Connect, a pre-orientation program for diverse students. The office also works closely with Student Diversity Board (SDB), she said.Senior Princess Mae Visconde said she is very involved with the OMS and helped plan the mixer with the intention of fostering community.“We’ve done [the mixer] in the past and just invited multicultural students, but this time, we opened it to everyone just so everyone can meet one another,” she said.Visconde said the goal was to help students branch out and make new connections.“Some students may not know about the office at all, so this gives them the opportunity to get to know the office, Gloria and the people who come here,” Visconde said. Visconde said she has been a member of SDB the past three years and has worked closely with Jenkins in the past. She said she planned the mixer last year because some students were not connecting with one another on campus and felt lonely.First year Theresa Bridge she attended the mixer because a friend invited her, and this was her first experience with the OMS.“[Mixers] help us get to know new students, get involved in the community and meet new people,” she said.She said she thinks introverted students have a hard time connecting with other students and campus organizations.“When you’re an introvert, you like to stay in,” Bridge said. “If you put yourself out there, it’s not hard; but for some people, it’s hard out of fear of acceptance.”Rawia Chaouali, an international student from Tunisia, said she agrees it is harder for introverts to make friends on campus, so extroverts have an easier time.“For me, I’m social and like to start conversations with whoever and wherever,” she said. “I’ve never felt lonely, actually. Maybe for some other students, it may be hard, though. Clubs are not promoted, or the culture in a club is not that involved.”Chaouali said she believes clubs and organizations should continue hosting mixers such as this one.“Events like this are important first of all because of networking,” Chawali said. “Second of all, it gets yourself out of your comfort zone. When you’re busy, you’re not homesick. It’s also fun, and you learn a lot.”Sophomore Karin Garcia also attended the mixer and said she thinks the OMS is such a good resource for students that she and her friends visit the office frequently.“It’s such a comfortable environment for us,” she said. “We know there are people of other cultures, so we definitely feel safe and comfortable with other people here. There are snacks, and it feels home-ish.”Garcia said she hopes people got to know more about the office through the mixer.“It gets more people to come and meet different people and learn about different cultures,” she said.Tags: Gloria Jenkins, multicultural mixer, Office of Multicultural Services, SDB, Student Diversity Boardlast_img read more

Read More »

Surrounding Areas

first_imgAUSTINAustin lies about 60 miles south of Fort Hood and can be reached by taking Interstate 35 south. It is the capital of Texas, with nearly 948,000 residents.Austin’s attraction has much to do with its cultural and recreational scenes. Tourists in Austin can enjoy the famous Sixth Street nightlife, hiking and biking trails, the University of Texas campus, Barton Springs (a 3-acre, spring-fed pool), the Austin Symphony Orchestra, ballet, the theater and the popular Capitol 10,000, the largest 10K in Texas.For more information, visit the convention and visitors bureau at www.austintexas.org or call 512-474-5171.DALLASDallas is northeast of the Fort Hood military reservation and can be reached by taking Interstate 35E north to the intersection of Interstate 30. The city is about 160 miles from Fort Hood and is the county seat of Dallas County, with a population of more than 1.3 million.The Dallas area offers the tourist shopping, recreation, arts and culture, family fun and the best in professional sports. Dallas is home to the Dallas Cowboys football team (five-time Super Bowl champions), Dallas Mavericks basketball, Texas Rangers baseball, Dallas Stars hockey (1999 Stanley Cup champions) and FC Dallas soccer. The city also hosts the Byron Nelson golf tournament.For more information, call the city’s tourism organization at 214-571-1000 or go to www.visitdallas.com.FORT WORTHFort Worth sits about 30 miles west of Dallas and about 160 miles north of Fort Hood. Settled in 1849 as an Army outpost at a fork of the Trinity River, Fort Worth was one of eight forts assigned to protect settlers from Indian attacks.Fort Worth’s businesses manufacture a variety of goods, from handcrafted saddles to F-16 fighter aircraft. World-class museums offer everything from agricultural exhibits to world-class masterpieces. The city is home to the famous Fort Worth Stock Show & Rodeo and the prestigious Van Cliburn International Piano Competition. It is also home to the Fort Worth Stockyards National Historic District, which looks much the same as it did more than 100 years ago when Exchange Avenue was filled with cattle bound for the Kansas packinghouses and railroad yards. For the ultimate cowboy experience, visit Fort Worth, “Where the West Begins.”For more information on Fort Worth, visit the city’s chamber of commerce at www.fortworthchamber.com or call 817-336-2491.GEORGETOWNGeorgetown is 25 miles north of Austin on Interstate 35. Known for its small-town charm, Georgetown offers an exciting weekend getaway for the whole family.Georgetown offers a variety of attractions, including the Inner Space Cavern, one of the best preserved caves in Texas. The historic downtown square has more than 30 unique shops where you can find that one-of-a-kind gift at any of the specialty, antique or gift shops. A variety of dining on the Square, from Cajun cuisine to coffeehouses, can meet any taste.For more information, visit the chamber of commerce at www.georgetownchamber.org or call 512-930-3535.SAN ANTONIOSan Antonio lies southwest of the Fort Hood military reservation and can be reached by taking Interstate 35 south about 150 miles until it intersects with Interstate 37 at downtown San Antonio.San Antonio is the seventh-largest city in the United States with a population of nearly 1.5 million and one of the top tourist destinations in the country. San Antonio has never lost touch with its heritage while keeping pace with a fast-changing world. Entertainment options are virtually limitless, and many things to see and do in San Antonio are available at little or no cost. Theme parks are fast becoming the most popular of San Antonio’s destinations. Other activities include soaking in the culture of the River Walk while enjoying a guided boat ride, taking in the proud history of The Alamo or cheering at a home game for the NBA’s Spurs.For more information, visit the chamber of commerce at www.sachamber.org or call 210-229-2100.NEW BRAUNFELSRight on the beaten path between Austin and San Antonio is beautiful New Braunfels. With the scenic Texas Hill Country as its backdrop and the clear Comal River as its centerpiece, this charming city of German heritage is a great place for family fun. The city offers residents and visitors a variety of attractions, including the Schlitterbahn Water Park, the Historic Outdoor Art Museum, performing arts and more.For more information, visit the chamber of commerce at www.innewbraunfels.com or call 800-572-2626.WACOWaco, in McLennan County, sits on the beautiful Brazos River in the “Heart of Texas.” Interstate 35, which runs through the center of the city, allows accessibility for tourism and business travel. Waco lies about 65 miles northeast of Fort Hood.The city is home to a symphony orchestra, Cameron Park Zoo, the Hawaiian Falls Waco water park, the Texas Ranger Hall of Fame & Museum, the Texas Sports Hall of Fame and the Waco Mammoth National Monument.For more information, visit the chamber of commerce at www.wacochamber.com or call 254-757-5600.last_img read more

Read More »

Culprit Junior One Kids Racing Road Bike Now Shipping

first_imgWe saw Culprit’s Junior One this summer at Interbike, shortly after its formal announcement, and liked the build quality. Now, it’s in stock and shipping for $1,295 USD including shipping.As founder Josh Colp has mentioned, it’s a real bike made for performance riding, it just happens to be sized for kids.  Colp says he made this video just to show it’ll easily handle the weight of a full size adult, but that it rolls quick and easy for kids. Standover height is just 550mm,  Interested? It and the Arrow One we reviewed are shipping now. Order form is downloadable here, or check their website for more details.There’s also the Junior Two 650C road bike for really short riders or kids that are in between sizes. Standover height is 686mm, and Colp says it should be ready to ship around January 15 for $1,350 USD. Both prices mentioned here are part of their New Year’s special and go up in mid-February.A junior racer on the Junior One in Thailand. Note the Token wheels and other decent spec.last_img read more

Read More »

Three Rutland nonprofits win GMP solar grants

first_imgGreen Mountain Power Corp,Three Rutland nonprofits will be going solar thanks to $60,000 in grants from Green Mountain Power.  Each nonprofit was awarded $20,000 to begin using the sun to create energy ‘and there’s still one more opportunity for another nonprofit to win a grant. The matching grants that will help these non-profit organizations build solar projects are part of GMP’s effort to make Rutland the Solar Capital of New England. ‘These non-profit groups will not only rely on the sun for a portion of their energy needs, they will help inform their clients and the general public about the benefits of solar energy,’said GMP President and CEO Mary Powell.  ‘We want to demonstrate solar in a wide variety of settings, so we are particularly pleased to award these grants, which will support three very public projects and important local institutions.’ Grant winners are the Vermont Farmer’s Food Center on West Street, Rutland Regional Community Television on Scale Avenue in Howe Center, and Good Shepherd Lutheran Church on Hillside Road. Rutland-based Same Sun of Vermont will build the projects for the Vermont Farmer’s Food Center and Rutland Regional Community Television. USA Solar Store in Perkinsville will build the Good Shepherd project. ‘Each of these projects will have significant environmental and economic benefits for the nonprofits, and will help engage the community at large,’said Steve Costello, GMP’s vice president for generation and energy innovation.   The Food Center is quickly becoming an important part of the western gateway to downtown Rutland, with hundreds of people visiting weekly.  The TV station will document the installation of its new solar array and air programs about it multiple times on three cable access channels.  Good Shepherd will use its array to teach students about energy at its Little Lambs Early Learning Center. Nonprofits interested in applying for the fourth $20,000 matching grant from GMP should contact David Dunn at the GMP Energy Innovation Center at 353-1456 or email [email protected](link sends e-mail) for more information.  The deadline for applying is Aug. 27 at 5 pm. GMP already operates the 150-kilowatt Creek Path Solar Farm on a former brownfield; just received a permit for an 18-kW solar project on the roof of the planned Energy Innovation Center in downtown Rutland; purchased an interest in the 150-kW solar farm on the former Poor Farm off Woodstock Avenue; is in the planning stages for the 2.3-megawatt Stafford Hill Solar Farm on a former city landfill; has filed for a state permit for the 150-kW Solar Center at Rutland Regional; recently signed an agreement to build a 75-kW solar array on the College of St. Joseph gymnasium roof; and has just issued a request for proposals for an approximately 75-kilowatt solar project on the roof of the company’s Electrical Maintenance facility on Green Hill Lane.last_img read more

Read More »

Secretary of State Condos releases official results of the historic 2018 General Election

first_imgVermont Business Magazine Today Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos announced the official results of the Vermont 2018 General Election held on Tuesday, November 6. The 2018 General Election set a record for most votes cast in a Vermont midterm election, with 278,230 voters casting ballots out of 490,074 registered voters. Vermont’s number of registered voters is also at an all-time high.Vote totals and winners for all federal and statewide offices were certified yesterday by Secretary Condos and a designee from each of Vermont’s three major parties (Democratic, Republican and Progressive). Vote totals and winners for County office, State Senate, and State Representative were canvassed at the town and county level.Official election results for the November 6th General Election can be viewed online at the Secretary of State’s website.(link is external)“Election Day here in Vermont was a shining example of what healthy democracy looks like,” said Secretary Condos. “The civil discourse among candidates, high voter turnout, and implementation of policies and practices preserving voter rights and access that we saw on Election Day are all reasons to be proud.”“Ensuring the integrity and accuracy of our Vermont elections is critical to our democratic process, and to voter confidence in that process,” said Secretary Condos. “That’s why we use paper ballots and conduct a post-election audit after every General Election. We want to ensure that there are no anomalies between official results and audited results, and want to give Vermonters peace of mind in the integrity of our elections.”The 2018 General Election Audit will take place at 10:00AM on Thursday, November 29th at the Pavilion Auditorium, located at 109 State Street(link is external) in Montpelier. Members of the public and the press are invited and encouraged to attend.Audit procedure includes a top to bottom audit of every race on each ballot cast in a randomly sampled 5% of voting precincts in Vermont, conducted by an independent third-party contractor. Vermont towns are required to seal and save ballots for 22 months following an election.The towns randomly selected for audit of 2018 General Election results are Westford (Chittenden 8-3), Mount Holly (Rutland-Windsor 2), Pittsford (Rutland 6), Hardwick (Caledonia 2), Cavendish (Windsor 2), Arlington (Bennington 4) and Glover (Orleans-Caledonia). These towns represent a geographically diverse sampling and include 6 towns which conduct vote counting by optical scan tabulator and 1 which conducts hand counts.Source: Secretary of State 11.14.2018last_img read more

Read More »

Hal Sandy, NEJC resident who designed world-famous Jayhawk logo, passes away at 93

first_imgHal and Wilda Sandy at the 1996 parade marking the 50th anniversary of his Jayhawk design.The northeast Johnson County man who designed one of the most recognizable logos in all of college sports has passed away.Hal Sandy, who lived much of his life in Westwood Hills and who moved to Claridge Court in Prairie Village with his wife Wilda in recent years, died last week at the age of 93.As a student at the University of Kansas, Sandy designed what has come to be known as the “smiling Jayhawk,” a tweak on the graphic that had been adopted by the university in 1941 that depicted a scowling bird with a frown on its face.Sandy’s Jayhawk logo, top, replaced the angrier version that had been in use by the school before.Sandy recalled that he enrolled in classes at KU as quickly as he could after being discharged from the army, and started taking classes in the summer of 1946. Shortly thereafter, Ed Browne, the school’s public relations head, challenged Sandy to recraft the mascot to reflect the optimistic mood of the post-war era.He sketched out precisely one version of the design.“I believe in doing things as quick as you can,” Sandy said in an interview a decade ago. “I drew it one time, and I was satisfied.”Sandy printed his friendlier looking design on decals and sold them across Lawrence, earning enough income from the effort to finance his final two years of college. When he graduated in 1947, he sold rights to his design to the Kansas Union Bookstore for $250.He went on to a career in advertising, founding his own agency that served a variety of major national clients.In 1996, KU marked the 50th anniversary of Sandy’s Jayhawk logo with a parade down Jayhawk Boulevard.An interview Sandy did with KU’s Max Max Falkenstien in the 2000s is below:last_img read more

Read More »

Women defeat Iowa State

first_imgWomen defeat Iowa StateMinnesota won all but one of the 16 events Friday at the Aquatic Center.Ichigo TakikawaKierra Smith swims the 100-yard butterfly event against Iowa State on Friday at the University Aquatic Center. Smith set meet records in the 100 breaststroke and 200 individual medley. (Ichigo Takikawa) Nickalas TabbertOctober 15, 2012Jump to CommentsShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare via EmailPrintThe Gophers women’s swimming and diving team defeated Iowa State 144-140 in its first home meet of the season Friday at the University Aquatic Center.The defending Big Ten champion women won all but one of the 16 events, but they still only edged the Cyclones by four.“It was a nice meet for our home opener,” women’s head coach Terry Nieszner said. “I think, overall, we raced really well.”Nieszner said she was pleased with how freshmen Lauren Votava and Kierra Smith competed. Votava set a meet record by winning the 200-yard freestyle in 1:49.85, while Smith set records in the 100 breaststroke and 200 individual medley with times of 1:02.77 and 2:04.48, respectively.The Gophers set meet records in 10 different events, beginning with the 200 medley relay. Junior Tess Behrens, senior Haley Spencer, junior Erin Caflisch and sophomore Tori Simenec finished the relay in 1:44.33.Sophomore Jessica Plant won both the 100 backstroke and 200 backstroke in record fashion. Her time of 2:01.71 in the 200 backstroke bested the previous record by nearly two seconds.In the 200 butterfly, Simenec set a meet record with her time of 2:02.03. She followed that with a record in the 100 butterfly with a time of 55.64.The women ended their night in the pool with a record-setting win in the 400-yard freestyle relay. Freshman Marina Spadoni, Behrens, sophomore Blake Zeiger and Plant finished the relay in 3:28.30. Head men’s and women’s coach Kelly Kremer said he was pleased with how both teams competed Friday. Though the men were competing against one another, he said he thought they competed better than they did a week ago at Michigan.Smith said her success Friday gives her confidence in the training the team has been doing.“It just feels like the work is paying off,” she said.Smith also said having times to compare from last week at Michigan allowed her to feel more comfortable at Friday’s dual meet.Junior diver Maggie Keefer won both the 1- and 3-meter diving competitions with scores of 289.72 and 302.25, respectively. She said she was pleased with her consistency but said lifting weights in practice this week had an effect on her and her teammates.“We’re just so sore,” she said. “But you know, just pushing through it, it’s part of the season.”Nieszner said the team will go back to hard conditioning in practice and focus on its meet next Saturday at Kansas.Both the men and women will compete Oct. 26 at home against Wisconsin.last_img read more

Read More »