New label-free method tracks molecules and drugs in live cells

first_imgA new type of highly sensitive microscopy developed by Harvard researchers could greatly expand the limits of modern biomedical imaging, allowing scientists to track the location of minuscule metabolites and drugs in living cells and tissues without the use of any kind of fluorescent labeling. The technique, based on stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), works by detecting the vibrations in chemical bonds between atoms. SRS microscopy could provide scientists with a potent new form of real-time, three-dimensional bioimaging free of fluorescent labels that can hinder many biological processes. The work is described this week in the journal Science by a team led by professor X. Sunney Xie, graduate student Christian W. Freudiger, and and post doctoral fellow Wei Min, all of the department of chemistry and chemical biology, in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. “SRS microscopy is a big leap forward in biomedical imaging, opening up real-time study of metabolism in living cells,” says Xie. “We’ve already used the technology to map lipids in a live cell, and to measure diffusion of medications in living tissue. These are just two early examples of how SRS microscopy may impact cell biology and medicine.”Xie, Freudinger, and Min’s mapping of saturated and unsaturated fats in live cells offers exciting new opportunities for metabolic studies of omega-3 fatty acids, required but not produced by the human body. Despite a growing body of evidence suggesting that omega-3 fatty acids provide many health benefits such as dampening inflammation, lowering blood triglyceride levels, and killing cancer cells, almost nothing is known about how fats like omega-3 are actually processed by our bodies. “Our diets have changed greatly in recent decades,” Xie says. “As a unique technology capable of observing fat distribution in live cells — and of differentiating between types of fat — SRS microscopy could prove useful in helping understand and treat the growing imbalance of saturated and unsaturated fats in our diets.”SRS microscopy could also prove useful in neuroimaging, since neurons are coated with fatty myelin sheaths. The researchers’ use of SRS microscopy to analyze skin tissue could also open new frontiers in drug development. Xie and colleagues used SRS microscopy to view how well retinoic acid, a topical acne medication, is absorbed into skin cells. They also used the technique to capture deep-skin penetration by dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), a compound added to many topical medications and ointments to enhance absorption.Scientists currently use a variety of techniques to visualize biomolecules, but most have significant limitations that are sidestepped by SRS microscopy.A jellyfish protein first discovered in 1962, green fluorescent protein (GFP), is now used extensively as a label for observing the activity of biomolecules. GFP labeling provides sharp images, but the bulky protein can perturb delicate biological pathways, especially in cases where its heft overwhelms smaller biomolecules. Also, GFP’s characteristic glow subsides with time, making it infeasible for long-term tracking.Much like SRS microscopy, conventional infrared (IR) and Raman microscopies measure the vibrations of chemical bonds between atoms. But they are low-sensitivity imaging techniques, and require either desiccated samples or high laser power, which limits use in imaging live specimens. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy, a field pioneered by Xie’s own group, cannot provide clear enough contrast for most molecules.Xie, Freudiger, and Min’s co-authors on the Science paper are Brian G. Saar, Sijia Lu, and Gary R. Holtom of Harvard’s Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology; Chengwei He and Jing X. Kang of the Department of Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School; and Jason C. Tsai of Pfizer Global Medical.The work was funded by Boehringer Ingelheim Fonds, the Army Research Office, the National Institutes of Health, the U.S. Department of Energy, the National Science Foundation, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and Pfizer Global Medical.last_img read more

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Buna man struck by passing truck in Orange County

first_imgStaff reportA Buna man was taken by helicopter to St. Elizabeth Medical Center with serious injuries after he was struck by a passing vehicle on State Highway 62 in Orange County.The Texas Department of Public Safety said the auto-pedestrian crash occurred near the Mauriceville Volunteer Fire Department around 4:15 p.m. Thursday. Bush was issued a traffic citation for failure to drive in a single lane.DPS said no other information would be released. Next UpThe DPS said in an issued statement that a 2003 Ford pickup truck was disabled on the northbound shoulder of SH 62. The driver realized he needed gasoline, got out of his vehicle and was struck by a 2017 Dodge pickup truck.The injured pedestrian was Todd Williams, 44. His passenger, Leslie Marcantel of Deweyville, was not injured.The driver of the Dodge, Edwin Bush, 53, of Kirbyville was not injured.last_img read more

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Trek Introduces the 2013 Radioshack Leopard Team Bikes

first_imgWith the road racing season here in the US quickly approaching, and racing already underway in the Southern Hemisphere, Trek has pulled the annual wraps off their team’s bikes. Under the management of Luca Guercilena, Team RLT has gotten off to a good start with the general classification Teams award at the recent Tour Down Under.See more of the bikes after the break.There are a lot of familiar faces in team RLT’s ranks for 2013, as Andy Schleck, Frank Schleck, Fabian Cancellara, Adreas Kloden, Jens Voigt, Chris Horner, Ben King, and many more make up a solid squad.As the standard road bike for the team, Trek’s 7.9 Madone will help them cover the miles with a unique blend of performance road and aero road, rather than a dedicated aero bike like many manufacturers are trending towards. The  Madones will be equipped with Dura Ace 9070 Di2 drivetrains, and Bontrager Aeolus D3 wheels. The bike is pictured with Bontrager tires, but the team will be racing on Schwalbe Ultremo HT tubular rubber.The Domane, aka the classics bike, will hopefully propel the likes of Cancellara to a victory after an unexpected crash last season in the Tour of Flanders left him with a shattered collarbone. The Domane still features Trek’s IsoSpeed decoupler, which should help to smooth out the cobbles the Spring classics are known for. More Dura Ace Di2 is found, though with classic road caliper brakes.Finally, when engaging in the race of truth (can you really say that anymore?), Trek’s team will be on the Speed Concept 9.9. Known for its Kammtail virtual foil design, the wind cheater has integrated brakes and a slick cockpit to shave every second possible.All of the racers will have full access to all of Bontrager’s DE wheels in 30, 50, 70, and 90mm depths. Supporting the rider’s backsides will be Bontrager’s Team Issue, Paradigm XXX, and RXL InForm saddles. Other parts found on team RLT’s bikes include Speedplay pedals, and SRM Powermeters.last_img read more

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LIFT Giving Circle donates over $20,000 in its first year

first_imgVermont Business Magazine LIFT Giving Circle(link is external), a philanthropic collective with 38 members from the Greater Burlington area, made its first annual award in the amount of $16,000 to The Janet S. Munt Family Room(link is external) (the Family Room). The Family Room is a parent child center providing programs that are accessible to all and flexible enough to meet the needs of our changing community. In its first year, LIFT Giving Circle has collectively awarded more than $20,000 to local nonprofits, including the Family Room and KidSafe Collaborative(link is external).LIFT was founded by Alexandra Clauss and Shireen Hart, Primmer Piper Eggleston & Cramer PC attorneys. They created the giving circle to harness the generosity and energy of the women in their community to help local groups with their missions.To learn more about LIFT, including how to become a member for 2019, please visit www.liftgivingcircle.com(link is external). Source: LIFT 10.15.2018last_img read more

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New high compression bottoms from Zensah

first_img Related Zensah, the Miami-based sports apparel brand is unveiling its new high compression bottoms, which include: shorts, capris and full-length tights. Zensah’s new compression bottoms incorporate a distinctive 3D design to accelerate recovery time.Commenting on the new launch, Ryan Oliver, Marketing Director at Zensah, said “The new Zensah high-compression shorts and tights raise the bar for compression apparel in today’s market. Most of the compression products available on the market – while doing a good job in support – are uncomfortable in fit and fabric.”The new Zensah products are produced with ‘seamless technology’ to eliminate seams that cause chafing. As Oliver states, “We used our proprietary Zensah fabric, which is breathable and moisture wicking. The new products were developed in Italy over a year-long process. We involved retail stores and athletes in the design process, and the feedback we received allowed us to push for a product very unique to the market.”Made with advanced technology to improve recovery time for athletes, the Zensah High Compression Bottoms are available in specialty stores across the US – with the launch well-timed as North America enters the autumn/fall season.Until now compression tights were typically made with a flat fabric, but Zensah believes it has revolutionized the design and comfort level of compression.The tights provide superior support to the legs, including the quadriceps and knees by increasing oxygen and blood flow and reducing muscle vibrations, allowing for advanced recovery after athletic activity.Reflective zippers on the tights allow for safer running and riding. The reflective zipper also makes it easy to slip the high compression tights on and off. The tights also contain an envelope pocket on the upper backside to carry cell phone, iPod, gels or keys.The Zensah high-compression shorts incorporate the same 3D design to target the quadriceps. The well-balanced compression and design provide a ‘massage feel’ to the quads. The shorts support the upper leg while allowing for unrestricted mobility in the lower leg.Ultra runner Mandy Miller tested the new Zensah shorts and said “…love the new compression shorts – wore them to sleep the other night for thigh pain – the perfect prescription…!”All Zensah compression apparel aims to provide athletes with the most comfortable experience:Seamless construction – eliminates chafingZensah silver ions – reduces bacteria growth and ‘takes away the stink!’Soft hand – comfortable materialPinpoint compression – providing compression where it is neededMoisture wickingAccording to research by Leisure Trends Group Colorado, Zensah was one of the top selling US compression brands in 2010. Zensah was founded in 2004, and remains a leading sports compression apparel brand.www.zensah.comlast_img read more

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Avoid the compliance pitfalls of social media advertising

first_img 15SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading » by: Kristen Tatlock“Marketing compliance” is not an oxymoron. You can work together to create social media messages that are both compliant and aesthetically pleasing.Follow these guidelines to minimize risk:• Loan products. Speak in general terms when possible. Stating “We have great car loan rates” might not pack the same punch as stating “We have great 60-month car loan rates,” but it eliminates the necessity for additional disclosures.The same holds true for open-end loan products. If you don’t state a rate, you won’t have to include additional disclosures.If you include a trigger term, remember that the additional disclosures can be on a separate page if it’s located one click away. Mortgage advertisements on social media must always include the Fair Housing logo or statement.last_img read more

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St. Thomas University celebrates Red Mass

first_img St. Thomas University celebrates Red Mass St. Thomas University School of Law’s St. Thomas More Catholic Law Society recently hosted a “Red Mass” in the campus Chapel of St. Anthony. More than 150 attorneys, judges, students, and faculty attended the service. One of the law school’s first-year students, Daniel P. Smith, is a priest and participated in the Mass. The Red Mass paid special tribute to the St. Thomas University School of Law alumni who serve their communities as members of the judiciary: Nuria Saenz de la Torre, John Bowman, Margaret T. Courtney, Pedro Dijols, Mindy Glazer, Don Hall, Michael Orlando, Elizabeth Reisman, Sam Slom, and newly-elected Victoria Del Pino. The luncheon following the Mass featured remarks by Rep. J.C. Planas, R-Miami, who spoke about his own faith and how it helped him persevere through difficult times. “The things you do as a law practitioner will affect people’s lives, and will have lasting repercussions,” he said. “When faced with tremendous challenges, your faith can give you the strength you need to do the right thing.” “Public service is a defining quality of St. Thomas’ students and alumni,” said Dean Bob Butterworth. October 15, 2006 Regular News St. Thomas University celebrates Red Masslast_img read more

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Keep an eye out for Bar fee statements

first_imgMembers may opt for inactive membership by marking the inactive status proclamation located near the bottom of the front page of the active membership statement – or online via the Bar’s website — and paying their fees by a postmark date of August 15.Those who chose inactive status on last year’s statement will receive an inactive membership fee statement this year. It has many of the same features as the active membership fee statement, but does not allow the inactive member to join sections. Inactive members, however, can become affiliate members of the Out of State Division or the Administrative Law; Alternative Dispute Resolution; Entertainment, Arts and Sports Law; Environmental and Land Use Law; Family Law; Government Lawyer; Health Law; Public Interest Law; Real Property, Probate & Trust Law; and Tax sections.choosing inactive status, Bar members will reduce their annual fees by $90 and receive automatic exemptions from continuing legal education requirements. They will, however, give up a number of privileges, including the privilege to practice or advise on Florida law or hold a job that requires an active Florida law license; to participate in the Bar’s certification program; to vote in Bar elections or be counted for purposes of apportionment of the Board of Governors; and to receive the Journal.Inactive members continue to receive the News. Inactive members who wish to become active again must call the Bar’s Member Services and Records Department at 850-561-5832 or 800-561-8060, ext. 5832. May 15, 2015 Managing Editor Regular News Pursuant to Rule 5-1.2, each year Bar members are required to certify whether they have complied with the trust accounting requirements of Rules 5-1.1 and 5-1.2 during the previous fiscal year.For many years, the certificate only asked whether lawyers had complied with the trust accounting rules, and the only possible answers were “yes” or “no.” For a number of Florida Bar members, such as judges and government lawyers, the language of the old certificate could be confusing, since many of them never received trust funds or property from clients or third parties and, therefore, were not required to keep such funds or property in trust. Some lawyers who were not required to maintain trust accounts marked “no” to indicate noncompliance with the trust accounting rules when they apparently meant “no” they did not have a trust account.To avoid confusion and improve the accuracy of responses, the trust account compliance certificate has been modified to specifically include an option for lawyers who are not required to maintain trust accounts. This group would include lawyers who never receive funds ( e.g., cash, checks, money orders, wire transfers) or property (such as jewelry, cars, stock certificates, or other tangible property) from clients or third parties in the course of legal representation. These lawyers may indicate under the second option that they are not required to maintain a trust account.Lawyers who do receive third-party or client funds or property in the course of their representation of a client should mark either option (1) or (3) of the current certificate, depending on whether they have complied with all the requirements of Rules 5-1.1 and 5-1.2. Lawyers who mark option (3) must provide The Florida Bar with information explaining the way in which they have failed to comply with the trust account and/or the safekeeping property rules.Pro Bono Reports Members’ fee statements include options for making voluntary contributions to a number of organizations, including: * Children’s Legal Services/The Florida Bar Foundation: 100 percent of this contribution goes to help protect the rights of low-income children who suffer most during difficult economic times.* Florida Supreme Court Historical Society: focuses on preserving the state’s judicial history and educating the public about the role of the courts.* Attorneys Charitable Trust (ACT): formed as a disaster relief fund offering Florida attorneys an avenue to donate aid following disasters which cause the disruption of legal processes and court systems or which result in reduced citizen access to the legal system and the pursuit of justice. ACT will help fellow attorneys as well as victims and their families in the aftermath of a disaster. * Florida Lawyers Association for the Maintenance of Excellence (FLAME): supports activities that promote a positive public attitude toward the legal profession and justice system, such as efforts to secure funding for state courts. Since 100 percent of FLAME, Inc., contributions may be allocated to lobbying, they are not tax deductable.Trust Accounts Keep an eye out for Bar fee statementscenter_img Keep an eye out for Bar fee statementsMark D. Killian Managing EditorFlorida Bar members will soon receive their 2015-16 fee statements, reflecting no increase in annual fees, which are payable July 1 and late if postmarked after August 15.Members will receive one of two fee statements: one for active members or another for those who have elected inactive status. Annual fees for active members are $265. Inactive members pay $175.This marks the 14th consecutive year without a fee increase.The fee statement is two-sided and both sides must be completed and be mailed along with payments to cover fees and section memberships.If they have not already done so, members must provide the Bar with their business email address in the part of the fee statement that allows members to update their member profile, including the name of their firm, mailing address, phone number, fax number, and email address. Bar rules also require members to list the physical address of their offices, if that address is different from their mailing address. Membership data also may be changed at any time by visiting www.floridabar.org. Members are encouraged to visit their member profile data on the Bar’s website to verify that the Bar has their most current mailing address.Members have the option to complete their annual fee statement and pay their fees online via the Bar’s website, but to do so, members must first be registered on the Bar’s website. If members have not registered, they can go to the member log-in on the Bar website, then follow the prompts. Instructions for paying Bar fees online are also provided on the paper form mailed to members’ official Bar addresses.Under the Rules Regulating The Florida Bar, fees postmarked after August 15 will be assessed a $50 late fee. Members whose payment is not received by September 30 will be deemed delinquent. The delinquency may be cleared by petitioning the Bar, paying the fees, the late fee, and a $150 reinstatement fee.Voluntary Contributions Bar members also may join sections and the Out of State Division using the fee form. The attorney’s current membership in a section is indicated on the form. To join other sections, members may darken the circles next to the section they want to join and include the appropriate amount with their membership fees.The statement provides the opportunity to reduce section dues by joining combinations of the Government Lawyer Section with the Administrative Law Section and/or the Criminal Law Section or the Administrative Law Section and the Criminal Law Section.A change this year is that Criminal Law Section is now available on the Authorized House Counsel and Law Faculty Affiliate member fee statements. The General Practice, Solo & Small Firm Section has also reduced its dues from $40 to $35 for these two fee statements.Inactive Membership This year’s fee form again includes a pro bono section for Bar members to report their contributions toward the Supreme Court’s aspirational pro bono goals. The court asks lawyers to provide 20 hours of pro bono service or donate $350 to a legal aid program each year. While providing pro bono is optional, filling out the pro bono reporting form on the statement is required by Bar rules.A series of questions promulgated by the court appear on the fee statement, depending on what option the attorney selected. The court wants to know:* How many hours of pro bono service the lawyer donated, and if the work was done through an organized legal aid program or on the lawyer’s own.* If the lawyer’s firm provided pro bono collectively under a plan operated by a circuit pro bono committee, with an indication of how much was allocated to the member.* If the lawyer has contributed to a legal aid organization in lieu of performing the pro bono work.* Whether the attorney was unable to provide pro bono service or met the provision for deferral.* How the lawyer fulfilled his or her service if done in some manner not specifically envisioned by the plan.Other Optionslast_img read more

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Regan Pittman anchors the Gophers at the net

first_imgRegan Pittman anchors the Gophers at the netDespite leading the team in blocks last season, Pittman still worked to improve in the offseason.Nur B. AdamMiddle Blocker Regan Pittman jumps to spike the ball at the Matrui Pavilion on Saturday, Oct. 5. The Gophers defeated Rutgers three sets to one.  Nolan O’HaraOctober 10, 2019Jump to CommentsShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare via EmailPrintComing off two big wins against then No. 10 Oregon and No. 1 Stanford in the middle of September, the Gophers’ Regan Pittman was named Big Ten Defensive Player of the Week. It was a dominant performance by the middle blocker, recording seven blocks against Oregon and seven more the following night against Stanford. Pittman’s strong defensive performance continued when the Gophers returned home to take on Clemson. She recorded five blocks in a hard-fought match, and also contributed offensively with nine kills. Her performance helped Minnesota win their fourth-straight match, a streak now sitting at nine matches. A year removed from leading the team in blocks and blocks per set, it appeared Pittman was simply building on a trend she started her first two seasons. She has a different perspective. “As a team, we really worked on it in the spring and it’s something that has not always been the best part of my game,” Pittman said after the match against Clemson. In her redshirt freshman season, Pittman was third on the team in blocks with 110. She built on that in her sophomore season, leading the team with 121 blocks and earning All-American and All-Big Ten honors. Her past success didn’t stop Pittman from putting in the preseason work. “I worked on it a ton this spring. I put a lot of effort into my blocking this spring,” she said. That hard work is paying off for Pittman and the Gophers through 12 matches this season. She leads the team with 49 blocks and has a team-high 1.26 blocks per set. Her 1.26 blocks per set ranks fifth in the Big Ten and 44th nationally. With Pittman leading the way, the Gophers’ play at the net has been a factor in the team rattling off nine straight wins, including their 4-0 start to Big Ten play.  Pittman said she can see the strides her game has taken since last season. “Yes, absolutely. I can see more, I’m able to block more, I have a lot more solo blocks,” she said. Pittman’s impact for the Gophers goes beyond her strong defensive performance. She has 103 kills this season, third on the team behind outside hitter Alexis Hart and opposite hitter Stephanie Samedy. Her .397 hit percentage ranks second on the team and sixth in the Big Ten. Pittman continues to hit at a high clip, even with a shorthanded rotation that’s forced her out of position the last few matches. For Pittman, playing out of position isn’t an issue. “It’s just the game of volleyball,” she said. “It is what it is.” Pittman and the Gophers will need to continue to play all-around volleyball in a difficult Big Ten conference. It won’t get any easier for a team with NCAA Championship aspirations.last_img read more

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Commercial Corner: Diversifying Your Commercial Real Estate Portfolio

first_imgAs the economy improves nationwide, Arizona is paving the path for commercial investment portfolios and green development projects. Remember to work with an experienced commercial real estate broker when doing your research.Here are the different commercial sectors worth consideration as you grow your investment portfolio:1. Apartment ComplexesApartments are stronger than ever due to the large residential foreclosure surge that began several years ago. Because of credit requirements and a more conservative residential loan process, there are a lot of individuals that continue to need economical housing options. In addition, vacancy rates in apartment complexes are now at an all-time low. Make sure that you have your commercial specialist pull and provide a three-year history on the vacancy rate for the property; however, keep in mind if the occupancy rate is consistently high, look at the potential in the area, and take that into consideration.2. Industrial Buildings and ComplexesIndustrial buildings are becoming the new black in real estate investment portfolios. They continue to be a popular target for investment as jobs, residential housing and new building start rates begin to come back and stabilize. Industrial jobs and the need for industrial space will continue to increase as the economy moves in a positive direction. New technology businesses are a great target for industrial buildings as they demand more space for call centers and staff.3. Retail Commercial SpaceRetail space took a big hit because local businesses were forced to close due to the lack of local spending caused by the economic downturn. As local companies begin to re-enter the retail commercial space, they will be looking for good locations that are economically priced. A trend with new retail brick and mortar stores has started to rise as they strive to find locations that are more neighborhood niche focused and/or located in cozy commercial cul de sacs.  Buildings that have more character and patio possibilities seem to be getting more attention from retail outlets.4. Office SpaceOffice space is always in demand, however the key to finding good office locations is to do a solid area check to make sure that the office space is in a good traffic area, and there should be an easy ingress/egress by way of freeway or main street. Office space is a privilege for most and again our recovering economy is forcing businesses to hire and expand, which means they will needmore office space. When looking to add this piece to your portfolio, parking in these structures is a plus, so make sure your parking space ratio is high and make sure your broker asks for more parking spaces in the property negotiations.When looking for these different commercial sectors remember to keep these three important factors in mind:1. Check for job growth in the immediate area with your local economic reporting office.2. Location, location, locationYou need to look for convenience, functionality, and stay away from the areas that have undergone functional obsolescence or are simply outdated for modern use.3. Look for strong anchors and local businesses that draw commerce into the neighborhood such as big box stores or smaller niche retail outlets.Above all, always remember to find a commercial real estate broker that works and thinks along these terms. Use them as a resource and create a winning team to make your investment project successful![stextbox id=”grey”]These tips are provided by Pete Baldwin, Designated Broker and Owner of Platinum Realty Network with offices in Scottsdale and Flagstaff, Ariz. With over 25 years of experience in business and real estate, Pete specializes in country club communities and second home investments, including large commercial portfolios. He also owns an Arizona branch of a family-owned, Montana-based company Baldwin Log Homes – Arizona Territory and has become the area leader in full- custom, handcrafted log homes in Northern Arizona. For more information, please visit www.PeteBaldwin.com.[/stextbox]last_img read more

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