Welch holds bipartisan roundtables on expanding outreach programs

first_imgRepresentatives Peter Welch and Chris Gibson (R-NY) will join together on Tuesday for two bipartisan roundtables focused on expanding a successful veterans outreach program pioneered by the Vermont National Guard. The events will take place in Rutland and Saratoga Springs.Welch and Gibson are working to pass a bipartisan bill to expand nationwide the Vermont Guard Outreach Program, which provides assistancewith the post-deployment transition to returning service members and their families. At the roundtable in Rutland, Welch and Gibson will hear from service members and their families as well as representatives of the Vermont National Guard, Vermont Small Business Development Committee and Veterans of Foreign Wars to get a clear understanding of how the outreach program works and why it merits expansion. Welch and Gibson will then travel to Saratoga Springs to conduct the second roundtable of the day with veterans and service members from New York. The Congressmen will bring the information they gather back to Washington to continue the push to pass their legislation. Gibson sits on the House Armed Services Committee, which has jurisdiction over the bill.Office of Representative Welch. 3.12.2012.last_img read more

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PTO providing €15K pro prize purse at SKODA TriGames in France

first_imgThe Professional Triathletes Organisation (PTO) has today announced that it will provide a €15,000 professional prize purse for the SKODA TriGames on 18th October 2020 at Mandelieu in the south of France.The middle distance event is the latest event to benefit from a PTO prize fund injection. PTO has supported the Huntington Triathlon in Indiana and the Spanish Triathlon Championships this month. Two events in the UK – Outlaw X and the Helvellyn Triathlon – also recently received support from PTO. Other prize fund initiatives have benefited events in Germany, the USA, Canada and Switzerland.PTO is also putting up a US$1 million prize purse for the middle distance pro athlete event at Challenge Daytona, currently scheduled to take place later this year.Charles Adamo, Executive Chairman of PTO, said, “Once again our PTO Professionals have worked together to find opportunities to support local and regional races and our triathlon community. The PTO is pleased to support the SKODA TriGames with a €15,000 prize purse.“We are grateful to Race Director Sylvain Lebret and for all the hard work required to have a race in this environment; and are and looking forward to a great day in the Cote d’Azur.”PTO male athletes currently on the start list include double Olympic Champion, Alistair Brownlee, as well as Ruedi Wild, Tim Don, Andi Boecherer, Rudy Von Berg, Peter Heemeryck, Arnaud Guilloux and Romain Guillaume.The women’s line-up includes current IRONMAN World Champion, Anne Haug, as well as Emma Bilham, Lucy Hall, French Long-Distance Champion, Jeanne Collonge, and middle-distance rising star, Justine Mathieux.Sylvain Lebret, Director of SKODA TriGames said “It is a privilege to be able to hold our event in this climate. Our team has worked tirelessly to provide athletes with the opportunity to race safely. It will be great to see professionals and amateur athletes unite for a fantastic race.“We are very excited about the partnership with PTO Professionals and the support of the PTO to add to a professional field at TriGames.”PTO World number four, Anne Haug commented, “I am delighted to unite and help support the PTO, my fellow professional athletes and the great triathlon community. We are very grateful to have the chance to be able to race at the SKODA TriGames and for the opportunity to support the wider triathlon community in this challenging environment.“It is a tribute to Sylvain Lebret and his TriGames team that they are able to host this event in what has been a very difficult year and I am delighted to be able to support it.”Mandelieu is home to the Esterel National park in The Cote d’Azur and is a protected area of natural beauty. Following a 1.9 km swim from Robinson beach, athletes will embark on a technical 90km bike course between the sea and the mountains. Competitors complete the famous Tanneron climb twice on each 45-bike loop and finish their journey with a 4-loop, flat 20km run along the beach from Siange riverside to the Marina at Mandelieu.Spaces are still available in the both professional and age-grouper fields. Professionals interested should contact Jane.hansom[at]protriathletes.org while age-groupers can register online.www.protriathletes.orgwww.trigames.fr Relatedlast_img read more

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NEWS SCAN: Tamiflu resistance, norovirus in Europe, Ebola research

first_imgJul 29, 2011Study: Oseltamivir use drives resistance in immunocompromised patientsThe selective pressure caused by the use of oseltamivir in pandemic H1N1 flu patients probably explains the sporadic instances of resistance to the drug, especially in immunocompromised patients, according to British researchers who conducted a case-control study. The authors examined data on patients who were hospitalized with 2009 H1N1 in England and Scotland between Jan 4, 2009, and Apr 30, 2010, according to their online report in Emerging Infectious Diseases (EID). They identified 34 patients with oseltamivir-resistant infections (case-patients) and 346 with oseltamivir-sensitive strains (controls). Of 28 case-patients with available information, 21 were immunocompromised, and most case-patients had received antiviral drugs before a sample was obtained. After adjustment for confounders, case-patients were significantly more likely than controls to be immunocompromised and were at higher risk for respiratory complications. The authors say monitoring of antiviral resistance is strongly recommended in immunocompromisted patients.EID reportSick food handlers suspected in European norovirus outbreaksThe most recent issue of Eurosurveillance described two norovirus outbreaks that occurred earlier this year, one in France that sickened 147 in a French military unit and was linked to an infected cook, and one from an undetermined source that sickened 56 people who attended a meeting at an Oslo hotel. The outbreak in France occurred in April and was linked to a canteen where a parachuting unit had eaten. Health officials who conducted the epidemiologic investigation suspected pasta or raw vegetables as the source. A nondiarrheal stool sample from a cook who had been sick 1 week earlier was positive for norovirus genogroup 1, and samples taken from raw carrots, salad, and tomato samples also yielded the pathogen. The authors noted that an acute gastroenteritis outbreak occurred at a nursing home in the same area where the same cook had worked a few days earlier, but no samples were taken from sick patients and the outbreak wasn’t reported to health authorities. The Norwegian outbreak occurred in late January at an upscale hotel where 900 people from all over the country attended a meeting. Health officials launched an investigation after 30 meeting attendees got sick. They asked meeting participants to complete an internet-based questionnaire and for sick patients to submit stool samples. Food safety authorities inspected the hotel’s kitchen. Norovirus was found in 3 of 4 patients who visited doctors but no genotyping was performed. Authorities did not determine a specific food suspect but did find several problems in the hotel’s kitchen such as improper washing routines and control of food temperatures. They concluded that the outbreak was probably caused by contaminated food from handlers, kitchen staff, waiters, or meeting participants.Jul 28 Euro Surveill report on French military unit outbreakJul 28 Euro Surveill report on Oslo hotel outbreakExperts call for more research on Ebola prevention, diagnosticsWhile experimental vaccines against the deadly Ebola virus are showing considerable promise, there is a need for more research on prevention and diagnostics, according to experts quoted in a news report in The Lancet. Dr. Heinz Feldmann of the US National Institutes of Health said that despite recent progress, licensed vaccines and drugs for Ebola are “years away,” and in the meantime prevention deserves greater emphasis. One major challenge is to identify the virus’s natural reservoir—suspected to be bats—and trace its transmission pathway to humans, he said. Esther Sterk of Medecins Sans Frontieres commented, “It’s a pity that so much research has the biological weapon aspect in mind rather than helping the affected population.” She said diagnosis of Ebola takes too long—up to 10 days in some cases—because of the lack of a biochemical and hematgologic test that’s usable in the field.Jul 30 Lancet reportlast_img read more

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CXC at 40 – Celebrating the Accomplishments: Continuing the Journey

first_imgThrowback to 2013: This article was written by Mr. Cleveland Sam for the special edition of the CARICOM View Magazine in observance of the 40th anniversary of the Caribbean Community  The quotation from the speech delivered by the Right Honourable Errol Barrow, at the inaugural meeting of the Caribbean Examinations Council in 1973 is very instructive or perhaps even prophetic reflecting 40 years later. CDB Approves Grant to Enhance Remote Learning for The UWI… It Is Our CXC: Let Us Work Out A Solution – Amb.… Oct 6, 2020 Oct 5, 2020 Forty years later, the framers of the CXC project must be proud of the achievements it has accomplished in a relatively short time and the impact it has had on the Caribbean education landscape. This impact has gone much further than that originally intended by the framers: that is, to prepare syllabuses and set examinations based on those syllabuses and issue certificates and diplomas. Today, CXC offers a comprehensive suite of qualifications which caters to learners of differing ages, interests and abilities; training of teachers; technical services to Ministries of Education; statistical data processing services; Item Writing training, Psychometric training; provision of learning support materials. From offering five subjects at the Caribbean Secondary Education Certificate (CSEC) at its first sitting in 1979, CXC now offers 35 subjects at CSEC; 46 Units at the Caribbean Advanced Proficiency Examination (CAPE); more than 100 standards in the Caribbean Vocational Qualification; the Caribbean Certificate of Secondary Level Competence (CCSLC); and the latest addition, the Caribbean Primary Exit Assessment (CPEA). During a given year, CXC trains hundreds of teachers across the 16 Participating Countries in a variety of areas. The Council conducts teacher orientation workshops, School-Based Assessment training, Item-Writing workshops and learning support resources development training. Additionally, the annual script-marking exercise is a huge training ground for thousands of the Region’s teachers. “When we meet as markers and we discuss, you realise the kinds of problems you get from your students, it is not peculiar to your territory, but is common throughout the Caribbean,” said Penelope Williams-Peters, a Guyanese teacher who teaches in the Turks and Caicos Islands and marks in Trinidad and Tobago.  “You get a greater understanding as to how to deal with these problems, because you gain as you have one way, one method, but when you interact with one other, you tend to have more to put together and out of it cometh good.” The training aspect of the marking exercise is also appreciated by Michelle Saunders-Clavery, a Vincentian who lives and teaches in Trinidad and Tobago. “I have gained quite a lot from it,” the English teacher said. “The marking and the standardising, it teaches you a lot about what you look for when you come to mark students’ work. When you come here, you get a better idea about what to look for, what the examination is looking for and I think every teacher should get this experience.” Integration magic!  One of CXC’s most important contributions to the Caribbean is its role in bringing the Region closer together in many more ways than one. From its inception, CXC has been a very inclusive organisation and much of its work is carried out by a multi-layered network of Caribbean resources, not just by the small staff at the Barbados and Jamaica offices. CXC Chairman Convenes Independent Review Team Indeed, not only has CXC emerged as a vital link in the Regional integration movement; but it has also built a reputation as one of the most critical pillars in the Region’s education architecture. The advent of CXC, an indigenous examinations board, complemented what was taking place in the political sphere at the time around the world. Former colonies were asserting their political self-determination; it was time for the Caribbean to assert its educational sovereignty. The words of Prime Minister Barrow are again enlightening: “Our teachers will set examination papers for the testing of Caribbean pupils in what they themselves have taught. Our teachers will mark and assess the examination work done by Caribbean pupils and recommend pass or fail. The institution of this Council therefore gives the Caribbean teacher an opportunity to come of age – to take over fully the education of the young people of the Caribbean in the same way that the Caribbean Community is taking its economic destinies into its own hands.” Sep 28, 2020center_img The work of developing a syllabus for each subject CXC offers is carried out by a Subject Panel; the work of putting together an examination paper for each is carried out by an Examining Committee. The members comprising these committees come from different countries across the Caribbean and together produce work for the entire Region. But perhaps the single most significant contributor to regional integration in CXC’s cap is the annual marking exercise. This is the largest mobilisation and concentration of Caribbean people at any given time in the year. During three weeks in July, CXC mobilises almost 6,000 teachers from 17 countries. More than 2,500 of these teachers are moved from the 17 countries to Barbados, Guyana, Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago. CXC recruits, transports, houses, feeds and pays these teachers. INTEGRATION MAGIC: CXC markers at Grantley Adams International Airport, Barbados The marking exercise is much more than marking examination scripts. It is a social, cultural and education mélange. And this is where the integration magic occurs! Imagine spending two weeks around the same table with eight people who teach the same subject in eight different schools in eight different countries. Then, think about eating lunch around a table with 10 people from five countries who teach at eight different schools and mark five different subjects. Add to this mix the social activities, tours and shopping trips that markers take part in and the Regional integration puzzle is complete. Lifelong friendships are formed, professional and social relationships are built and even a few marriages result. Dr. Merle Baker, a Trinidadian educator who marked CSEC from its inception in 1979, reflecting on her marking experiences at an event in Jamaica in 2009 spoke in glowing terms of the fun times. “We can now speak with authority about the beauty and natural wonders of those Caribbean destinations [marking centres]; the majestic elegance of the Kaieteur, Orinduik and Dunn’s River waterfalls, and the serenity of Harrison’s Cave, at CXC’s expense.” Dr. Baker, who was speaking on behalf of honourees for the 30th Anniversary of CSEC, reminisced on the cultural potpourri that is marking. “…We did not only learn about our countries, but we learned about each other, our similarities and differences. At the first [marking] tables there were examiners from Trinidad and Tobago, Barbados, Jamaica, Dominica, Grenada, Bahamas, Guyana and Belize…an original CARICOM setting,” she emphasised, “which made intimate connections as friends and comrades, as the Guyanese then called themselves. We were united for two concentrated weeks on a consuming pressurized task and whilst thus engaged we were able to discuss politics, family, social and cultural issues, educational needs and sports.” Strongest bond Mrs. Marguerite Bowie, former Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Education, Jamaica, noted in an interview for a CXC documentary, “I consider CXC one of the most enduring forces of integration in the Caribbean, because it brings together teachers from across the Caribbean to share.” The former Deputy Chair of CXC added, “It also exposes people to the different cultures.” Very often, CXC is compared with The University of the West Indies and West Indies Cricket as three forces of regional integration. However, the impact and reach of CXC is unmatched by any other regional institution. One person who is clear about this is Dr. the Honourable Tim Gopeesingh, current Minister of Education in Trinidad and Tobago. Speaking at the 2011 Opening Ceremony of Council and Presentation to Regional Top Awards at the Hyatt in Port-of-Spain, Minister Gopeesingh said that CXC creates the strongest bond among Caribbean people. “…Our Region and national societies have perhaps never viewed the Caribbean Examinations Council (CXC) as one very crucial, significant element of Regional unity, and I say tonight that the time has come for us to change this,” the Minister stated. “Far beyond ensuring that our Region’s top students know they are recognised and appreciated – you have subconsciously played a very major role in enhancing Caribbean unity…” The Trinidadian Education Minister posited that the common CXC examinations that Caribbean students write annually: CSEC and CAPE, are perhaps strongest existing Regional bond. Sir Kenneth Hall, OJ, ON, former Chair of CXC and a former Governor-General of Jamaica, reflected on CXC’s role in Regional integration. “There are few institutions in the Caribbean today that have had such a significant impact on the lives, the values, of the Caribbean people,” Sir Kenneth explained. “Every secondary school in the Caribbean is affected by and influenced by CXC.” More than every school, CXC has impacted every family in the Caribbean at one point in the last 40 years. To be more precise, “From the inception of the first examinations in 1979 to today, 6.2 million Caribbean persons from 19 territories have written CXC exams,” stated Dr Didacus Jules, Registrar of CXC in a recent article. As CXC implements its vision to assure the human resource competitiveness of the Caribbean, the accomplishments of CXC over the last 40 years have given CXC and the Region the ability to look to the future with confidence. Sep 28, 2020 “This new institution forges another link in the chain of Commonwealth Caribbean integration, a chain whose links have been increasing in number and in strength over the past ten years. It is, therefore, fitting that so early in the year 1973, which augurs well to be a year of challenge to the Caribbean Commonwealth and to its institutions that the Caribbean Examinations Council should begin to function.” The Right Honourable Errol Barrow, Prime Minister of Barbados. You may be interested in… Statement by Professor Sir Hilary Beckles, Chairman,… Share this:PrintTwitterFacebookLinkedInLike this:Like Loading… There’s now a History Book on CXCTHE Caribbean Examinations Council (CXC) has chronicled its rich 40-year history in a book written by historian Professor Patrick Bryan… Titled A History of the Caribbean Examinations Council, 1973-2013, the publication details the evolution of the CXC and the contributions of regional leaders who, prior to Independence, fought for an…December 7, 2014In “CARICOM”‘I AM CARICOM’ Schools’ Campaign Launched in Barbados (Barbados Government Information Service) Fourth, fifth and sixth form students of the Alleyne School in Barbados now have a better understanding of the history of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM), and how it has evolved over the years. They were given a perspective at a ceremony to kick off the Barbados leg…February 14, 2020In “Barbados”CARICOM Institutions talk CSME Free Movement of PersonsThe Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Secretariat this week engaged regional institutions based in Barbados on the processes for Free Movement of persons under the CARICOM Single Market and Economy (CSME). Representatives from the CARICOM Development Fund (CDF), the Caribbean Examinations Council (CXC), and the Caribbean Export Development Agency among others met…March 8, 2018In “CARICOM”Share this on WhatsApplast_img read more

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Going, going, gone? Auctions suffer their worst-ever fall

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New Life For Life-Saving Station

first_imgPeggy Spellman HoeyThe beach house with gabled windows and watch tower on Dune Road overlooking the Atlantic Ocean from Tiana Beach once served as a U.S. Coast Guard Life-Saving Station manned entirely by African-Americans.After those glory days were over, in the late 1980s, the property transformed into Neptune’s Night Club where dee-jays saved a social life or two, spinning records through long, balmy summer nights into early 2013.Now, five years after the music stopped, new life has been breathed into the former life-saving station as the property undergoes a $963,300 stabilization and exterior restoration by the Town of Southampton.So far, all of the non-historic rooms, which were added by Neptune’s former owners, decking, and reproduction windows, have been razed. The building’s walls have been reframed and new electric service has been added. The building has been prepped for new cedar shingle siding, as part of an exterior restoration, the chimney has been restored, and the building’s crowning glory, its watch tower, has been installed, once again, to the top of the building.“The rest is not complete,” said McLean and Associates’ Matthew Jedlicka, who is the town consultant coordinating the restoration project.Second phase work still to come includes the installation of the windows, custom built doors for the boat room, and all cedar siding on the exterior. The roof must be completed and outside decking with two ramps, which will lead up to the boat room.This phase is expected to be completed during the summer.“There will be a final phase to finish everything inside,” Jedlicka said.The intent is that the full project will be completed by summer 2019, and from there, Jedlicka expects the building will be used as a museum. It will have a public restroom, and “some sort of food access,” with a seating area on the deck, though not like a restaurant, he said. He could not be sure what kind of food service town officials have under consideration.“A window maybe, similar to other beaches, but I don’t know if their plan is that big,” he added.The former life-saving station was purchased under the Community Preservation Fund for $3.2 million in March 2014, according to Town Community Preservation Manager Mary Wilson.Neptune’s was one of two Dune Road nightclubs that were a constant source of residents’ quality-of-life complaints, regularly keeping police and code enforcement occupied over the summer, especially on weekends.The second club, the former Summers Night Club, down the road in Hampton Bays, which was purchased, though not with CPF money, houses an activity center run by the town’s Parks and Recreation Department.peggy@indyeastend.com Sharelast_img read more

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McDermott to Name DLV 2000 in April

first_imgMcDermott said it will hold a naming ceremony for its new derrick lay vessel, the DLV 2000, at Keppel’s Singmarine Shipyard in Singapore on Thursday, April 14, 2016.The DLV 2000 is a class 3 dynamically positioned vessel combining a 2,200-ton revolving crane with a deepwater S-lay pipelay system configured to install pipelines with diameters ranging from 4.5 to 60 inches in water depths up to 10,000 ft. The vessel can accommodate up to 400 personnel to facilitate hook-up and commissioning projects and incorporates a large, 43,000 sq. ft. open deck to allow the transportation and assembly of large subsea structures.The vessel has also been designed and constructed to accommodate a deepwater, 500-ton flexlay system that can be installed, at a future date, in response to specific market needs.With a maximum transit speed of 13.5 knots, the DLV 2000 will be deployed as a global asset within the McDermott fleet.“Fast, powerful and versatile, the DLV 2000 gives McDermott the capabilities to undertake projects that will expand our portfolio of target markets,” said David Dickson, McDermott’s president and CEO. “As the new flagship of our fleet, this will allow McDermott to utilize one vessel on projects requiring a combination of pipelay, heavy lift and offshore workforce accommodation that would normally have to be executed by multiple vessels. We also expect the DLV 2000 to provide McDermott with a key asset for field development in remote locations through the combination of these versatile construction capabilities and fast transit speed.”last_img read more

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Was it just the cold or is it a relapse?

first_imgStay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe now for unlimited access Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

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In uncertain times

first_imgDuring its long climb out of recession towards solid ground, the construction sector has become well used to ups and downs in economic assessments of its performance, with a seemingly endless run of revisions to official output data. Growth forecasts, similarly, have fluctuated, thanks in part to volatile international markets which, in this era of sparse UK public spending, much of the sector’s fortunes rely on.Such insecurity and uncertainty has, ironically, become something of a constant. But even so, the fact that construction’s two major forecasters have now issued their third set in a row of downward revisions to expectations should be enough to catch attention.Forecasts issued last week by Experian now predict growth of 2% this year, down from 2.6% forecast in January and 3.6% just six months ago. The finance house has also lowered projections for next year from 4.3% to 2.9% over the same six month period. These falls echo a pattern of lowered expectations from the Construction Products Association earlier this month, which is now forecasting 3.0% growth this year and 3.6% next.Construction’s growth is still underpinned by the private housing sector, and the good news is that demand in this market shows little sign of waning. But reduced expectations from both of the two other largest sectors of the construction economy – new build commercial and infrastructure – is significant cause for concern.The weakened forecasts have been blamed partly on a commercial sector slowdown driven by uncertainty ahead of the EU referendum; which ties in with rumours of city schemes in particular being slowed or stalled until the outcome of the June vote.Given that that is just two months away, it may be tempting to dismiss this as a short-term blip. But as Experian’s analysis makes clear, the lead-in time on commercial work means that uncertainty around the Brexit outcome has already fed into its lowered projections for 2017.This shines an uncomfortably revealing light on what might happen if this uncertainty is prolonged, first by a vote for Brexit and then by negotiations with the EU over a trading relationship, all of which would take at least two years. Regardless of whether you believe the industry would ultimately do better in or out of the union, the negative impact on the commercial sector caused by the uncertainty alone could easily be felt into the next decade.The commercial sector is of course not the only source of sustenance for the construction industry; but should the Leave scenario unfold, it would create far greater reliance on the government-backed infrastructure pipeline to provide a steady, predictable source of growth. And in this context, the tendency of the UK’s headline mega-schemes to slip behind schedule – once they’ve had their moment basking in the glow of Budget headlines – becomes especially unpalatable.Of the schemes most talked about after the most recent Budget, the vast majority are several years away from even being tendered. And the continuing delays to two long-running sagas – a new generation of nuclear power at Hinkley and new airport capacity somewhere in the South-east – provide a clear warning against relying too heavily on these projects coming forward when the government says they will.Of course, this does not yet add up to another winter of discontent. Growth of around 2% a year will still leave the industry in decent health, so for now the latest figures should not dampen spirits too thoroughly; particularly since, given the much-publicised skills shortages looming over the sector, there have already been concerns over its ability to meet future demand.But the worst enemy of the industry (recession aside) tends to be uncertainty, with all the difficulty it creates for managing the flow of materials and labour, and, as a result, controlling costs. So the sector would be forgiven for being slightly spooked by the pattern emerging from the forecasts – and should prepare to be more so if the Leave campaigners do pull off a victory in two months’ time.Sarah Richardson, editorlast_img read more

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Barrister accused of deceiving court to block prosecution of paedophile

first_imgA barrister deceived a court to stop the prosecution of a head teacher accused of sexual abuse, a Conservative MP has claimed under parliamentary privilege. Cheryl Gillan, a former cabinet minister, accused Andrew Bright QC of failing to disclose crucial evidence to a judge in 2003. As a result Peter Wright, who was accused of sexually abusing pupils in the 1960s, escaped prosecution for a decade, Gillan claimed. Wright was headmaster of Caldicott prep school in Buckinghamshire from 1968 to 1993.Bright, who now sits as a judge at St Albans, applied for a stay indictment to prevent Wright, then 73, from facing trial. He argued his client would not get a fair trial as the allegations were three decades old.However, Bright failed to disclose that the defence solicitors had engaged in private correspondence with Caldecott school regarding the availability of the school pupil records to the defence.Gillan said: ‘Had that correspondence been disclosed to the court, it could have assisted the prosecution in opposing the application for the stay and, in all probability, would have undermined the grounds of the application to stay the proceedings on the indictment. The court had been gravely misled by the failure of the defence.’Wright has since been convicted of abusing five other boys while working at Caldicott school. Three other members of staff have also been convicted.The ‘hidden correspondence’ came to light five years later.The conduct of those who represented Wright has been investigated by the Bar Standards Board and the Solicitors Regulation Authority. Both regulators rejected the complaint, brought by an alleged victim, Tiom Perry.An SRA spokesperson said: ’We investigated complaints from Mr Perry in 2010 and 2011, however we did not find any evidence of misconduct.‘A spokesperson for the judiciary added: ‘The SRA conducted an independent investigation and rejected the complaint that the court had been misled. It maintained that conclusion after a review.’last_img read more

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