DEATH NOTICES: Dec. 10, 2020

first_img Next UpClyde Thomas “Tom” Lawton, 74, of Groves, Texas died Thursday, November 26, 2020. Services pending with Levingston Funeral Home –Groves.William Loyd Moses, 90, of Groves, Texas died Tuesday, December 8, 2020. Services pending with Levingston Funeral Home – Groves.Mr. Christopher Griffin, 57 of Orange, TX died December 8, 2020. Services pending with Hannah Funeral Home, Inc. Charles “Charley” Leonard Pemberton, 95, of Beaumont, died Wednesday, December 9, 2020. Broussard’s, 2000 McFaddin Avenue, Beaumont.Bridgette Marie LeBlanc, 94, of Winnie, died Wednesday, December 9, 2020. Broussard’s, 505 North 12th Street, Nederland.Virginia “Ginger” Wilson, 69, of Port Neches, Texas died December 9, 2020. Services pending with Levingston Funeral Home – Port Neches.Mary Williams, 94, of Nederland, Texas passed away December 10, 2020. Services are under the direction of Melancon’s Funeral Home inNederland. Linda L. Tackwood, 73, of Port Arthur, TX died December 5, 2020. Services pending with Hannah Funeral Home, Inc.Junior Nico, 89, of Port Arthur, TX died December 7, 2020. Services pending with Hannah Funeral Home, Inc.Jeremy Scott LeJeune, 44, of Austin, Texas passed away December 6, 2020. Services are under the direction of Melancon’s Funeral Home in Nederland.center_img Era Marcelene Weeks, 86, of Nederland, died Thursday, December 3, 2020, Broussard’s, Nederland.Ray Austin Evans, 34, of Winnie, died Tuesday, December 8, 2020. Broussard’s, 2000 McFaddin Avenue, Beaumont.Helen Estes, 90, of Port Neches, Texas died December 8, 2020. Services pending with Levingston Funeral Home – Groves.Allen McMahan, 40, of Winnie, died Wednesday, December 9, 2020. Broussard’s, 2000 McFaddin Avenue, Beaumont.Joan Holland, 74 of Port Arthur, TX died Thursday, December 10, 2020. Services are pending at Hannah Funeral Home, Inc.last_img read more

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Fellows Gear Shaper building transformed into arts space, opening July 20

first_imgFor years, the Fellows Gear Shaper Building has loomed rundown and derelict along the Black River, a symbol of former Springfieldâ s glory as the machine tool capital of the world. The factoryâ s hidden creative possibilities were just waiting to be discovered. Now, nearly 40 years after the old factory closed its doors, those possibilities are about to be revealed. The 160,000-square-foot sprawling complex has a new name, a new look and a new purpose. The building, now known as One Hundred River Street, has been transformed into Vermontâ s newest venue for the arts. Inside, the Great Hall, a splendid, soaring space is about to be inaugurated as a great new venue for the arts, capable of showcasing large artwork and sculpture, performance art, dance, music and lectures. With the buildingâ s multi-million-dollar renovation nearly completed, the public is invited to the unveiling of the Great Hall at a reception slated for Friday, July 20, from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at One Hundred River Street. The first group art show, Emergence, features works by artists from around Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine and includes sculpture, stoneware, tapestries, mobiles and more. The work on exhibit was chosen to symbolize the adaptive-reuse of the building, and, as boosters suggest, the re-emergence of Springfield. The Great Hall is the vision of Rick Genderson and John Meekin, the project developers, to create a public art space for Springfield with the idea that art creates energy. â It will become a town center and gathering space and help draw attention to Springfield as a destination,’said Genderson. â It’s an area that’s gotten kicked from everybody, and here you have this beautiful old building on a beautiful river with an exceptional space. It needed some help, the area needed some help, and you had some good people there who were willing to work on it, and we were willing to take a chance on it,’he said. The Fellows Gear Shaper Companyâ s legacy helps tell the story of Springfield. â The first time I toured the huge, light filled space that was to become the Great Hall, the 14-foot walls, the huge overhead timbers and the soaring ceiling, it inspired contrasting images of a Gothic church with clerestory windows and one of the sprawling, gritty workrooms of the industrial factory, Fellows Gear Shaper,’said Nina Jamison, founder of Gallery at the VAULT and coordinator of the Great Hall. â Springfieldâ s boom time echoed in our footfalls.â  Jamison wanted to honor the history of the building and the machinists by using the word great in its modern connotations of excellence in the title of Great Hall.  A great hall in the middle ages was the main room of a royal palace or large manor house. At that time the word great simply meant big. With a soaring 25-foot ceiling and clerestory windows, the 150-foot-long by 45-foot-wide world-class public art space is unique in the region and will accommodate and compliment very large artwork and sculpture. When word got out about the Great Hall, via the Vermont Art Councilâ s website and other ways, the response was immediate from artists who had a difficult time finding display places for their extra-large work. â Within one month, a two-year lineup of shows was complete with both locally known artists and those who are more widely recognized, such as Fran Bull and Sabra Field,’Jamison said. Even before completion, the space spiked the creative juices in every artist who toured the Great Hall. Sculptor Carolyn Enz Hack decided to use her grant from the Vermont Community Foundation to create a sculpture in the Great Hall rather than at the more established Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center. She is among the artists who are featured in the first exhibit, Emergence. Others include Patty Sgrecci of Brandon, mobiles; Rich Hearn of Chester, oil on canvas; Scot Borofsky of Brattleboro, enamel on linen; Robert Carsten of Springfield, pastel; Robert Oâ Brien of Perkinsville, watercolor; Oliver Schemm of Saxtons River, sculpture; Carolyn Enz Hack of Thetford Center, sculpture; Stephen Procter of Brattleboro, stoneware, and Tapestry Weavers in New England (TWiNE): Suzanne Pretty of Farmington, NH; Betsy Wing of Hartland; Sarah Robbins Warren of Jefferson, NH; Priscilla May Alden of East Boothbay Maine and Eve S. Pearce of Bennington, VT. The entire project is a model of redevelopmentâ the Great Hall is icing on the cake, said Bob Flint, Executive Director of the Springfield Regional Development Corp. â Itâ s leveraging this vital part of Springfield’s heritage to once again become a center of activity for the future.” Flint has been a prime mover in the effort to assemble the private investments and public grants that made the project possible. He said this far-reaching economic development project for the region and the state â will impact our economy in so many ways. Itâ s a home run.â  In addition to the Great Hall, the mixed-use facility will include a medical center and space for retail and restaurants. Located on the Black River upriver from the impressive Comtu Falls, which cascade 110 feet down over a series of drops, One Hundred River Street stands at the entrance to the Designated Downtown of Springfield. A new 16â x32’historic mural by artist Jamie Townsend covers part of a long neglected building, an artistic â stepping stone’between the Great Hall and the heart of downtown. Historical information on the 1800â s Springfield to Charlestown NH Stagecoach is mounted next to the mural.  Renovations under way July 2011.last_img read more

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New Royalton town office opens, USDA reveals economic development strategy

first_imgVermont Business Magazine After years of operating in basement offices scattered throughout town, Royalton town officials celebrated the opening of their new office building Monday with local, state, and United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) officials.  USDA Rural Business Cooperative Service Administrator Sam Rikkers used the occasion to announce a new USDA initiative that will set aside $300 million in USDA Rural Development grants and loans for regionally significant projects.“Royalton’s new town office building is one of the first projects in the country to receive USDA grant and loan funds as part of a new community and economic development initiative emphasizing the importance of strategic regional planning,” said Rikkers. “By adhering to the Regional Plan, Royalton has ensured that this new facility benefits both the local community and the region as a whole. Regional planning is a critical keystone to building sustainable rural communities.”The Strategic Economic and Community Development Initiative, included in the 2014 Farm Bill, directs the USDA to prioritize projects that tie into long-term regional plans. Rikkers announced that the USDA will dedicate $300 million in loan and grant funds for the initiative across four USDA Rural Development programs this year: the Community Facilities Loan and Grant Program, the Water and Waste Disposal Loan and Grant Program, the Business and Industry Loan Guarantee Program, and the Rural Business Development Grant Program. Royalton used a $600,000 USDA loan and a $50,000 USDA grant to construct and equip the new municipal building. The new building will increase the town’s capacity to serve its residents and those of the surrounding towns of Hartford, Tunbridge, Bethel and Sharon. The new facility will enable the town to provide police and rescue services to the region through mutual aid agreements. Royalton cited the 2014 Two Rivers-Ottauquechee Regional Plan in its application, which made it eligible for the Strategic Economic and Community Development Initiative funding. During Monday’s announcement, Rikkers announced that the Vermont Technology Alliance (VTA), a non-profit business alliance which supports and promotes Vermont’s technology industry, received a $50,000 Rural Business Development Grant through the new regional initiative.  The VTA will use the grant to market and develop technology-based jobs across the state, with an emphasis on rural areas like Royalton. The VTA’s application tied into workforce development goals outlined in Vermont’s Statewide Community and Economic Development Strategy recently completed by the Vermont Agency of Commerce and Community Development. Source: ROYALTON, VT, Dec. 14, 2015— USDA. USDA, through its RD mission area, administers and manages housing, business and community infrastructure programs through a national network of state and local offices. Rural Development has an active portfolio of more than $211 billion in loans and loan guarantees. These programs are designed to improve the economic stability of rural communities, businesses, residents, farmers and ranchers and improve the quality of life in rural areas. For more information on Rural Development visit the Vermont/New Hampshire Rural Development website at www.rd.usda.gov/vt(link is external) or contact USDA RD at(802) 828-6000.last_img read more

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Four artist teams will present preliminary design concepts for an Art in State Buildings project

first_imgVermont Business Magazine The public is invited to attend a presentation by four artist/artist teams of preliminary concepts for a work of public art to be installed at the Vermont Agriculture and Environmental Lab in Randolph Center. The meeting will be held Wednesday, July 11 at 6 p.m. in Judd Hall at Vermont Technical College. During the meeting, the artists will present images, drawings, plans, or models as available.The project is part of the Vermont Art in State Buildings Program administered by the Vermont Arts Council in partnership with the Vermont Department of Buildings and General Services.The four finalists are:Dan Snow, DummerstonOliver Schemm, Saxtons RiverHeather Ritchie/Ryan Mays, BarreJim Sardonis, RandolphThe finalists were chosen from a pool of 21 applicants. Following the public presentation, the Project Review Committee — made up of building employees, community members, and visual arts experts — will meet to determine which artist/team will be selected to create the final work.Those who plan to attend are encouraged to RSVP.  Judd Hall is physically accessible for visitors who use wheelchairs or other mobility aids and those who prefer not to use stairs. To RSVP or to ask questions regarding accessibility contact Michele Bailey by sending an email to mbailey@vermontartscouncil.org(link sends e-mail) or by calling 802.828.3294. Voice and relay calls are welcome.The Art in State Buildings Program is a partnership between the Vermont Arts Council and the Vermont Department of Buildings and General Services. Funded by the Art in State Buildings Act, the program allows up to two capital construction projects be selected each year. For more information on the Art in State Buildings program or other public art projects, visit http://www.vermontartscouncil.org/grants-and-services/artists/art-in-state-buildings(link is external).The Vermont Arts Council envisions a state where everyone has access to the arts and creativity in their life, education, and community. Through its programs and services, the Council strives to increase public awareness of the positive role artists and arts organizations play in communities and to maximize opportunities for everyone to experience the arts. Since 1965, the Council has been the state’s primary provider of funding, advocacy, and information for the arts in Vermont. www.vermontartscouncil.org(link is external).Source: Vermont Arts Council July 3, 2018last_img read more

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Almo Pro A/V E4 Experience Stops in Atlanta October 15th

first_imgAlmo Pro A/V will make its final 2019 E4 Experience stop in Atlanta on October 15th. E4 Atlanta features high quality courses worth AVIXA CTS Renewal Units (RUs), including a special session focused on the “next-generation workplace.” Other highlights include Almo’s new Zoom Room Bundles, an Almo Sound Options Audio Pavilion and an autograph signing with former Atlanta Hawk, Spud Webb.“More than 600 resellers, integrators and end users registered for the New York Metro E4 Experience,” said Melody Craigmyle, vice president of marketing for Almo Professional A/V. “We issued hundreds of CTS RUs and certifications for Digital Signage and SDVoE trainings led by our team of all-star educators. Our attendees engaged in valuable conversations with more than 40 vendors showing the latest technology and integrated systems. We are taking this momentum to Atlanta next week where we will conclude our most successful year of E4 Experiences in terms of attendance and accreditation.”Craigmyle said that next week Kay Sargent, director at HOK Workplace is presenting the session, “The Next Generation Workplace,” which examines space planning and the impact the Generation Z’s will have, emerging differences in lifestyle/culture/workstyles and their effects on the next generation workplace.Other E4 Atlanta courses include:SDVoE AV-Over-IP Design Certification (1 CTS RU)Digital Signage Certification- Foundations of Digital Signage (1 CTS RU)KEYNOTE: An Unbiased Explanation of AV-Over-IP (1.5 CTS RUs)Designing for the User Experience (1 CTS RU)Exhibit Hall Production Tours (2); AV-Over-IP In Action (1 CTS RU)AV in an IT World (1 CTS RU)Introduction to Windows Collaboration Displays (1 CTS RU)Universal Serial Bus (USB) Deep Dive Technology Exploration for AV Design and Integration (1 CTS RU)Installation Issues for Converged AV/IT Systems (1 CTS RU)Top 10 (+4) Things Gary Kayye Saw at InfoComm 2019 (1 CTS RU)See related  SpinetiX and Almo Pro A/V Announce Distribution Partnership for US MarketLast month, Almo announced new Zoom Room hardware bundles, all of which will be stocked and ready for shipping in the U.S. and Latin America. Designed to transform any area into a modern, easy-to-use power collaboration space, the bundles make it easy for integrators to get all of the necessary components in a single box, with a single SKU from a single supplier. The Zoom Room bundles will be shown next week at the Atlanta E4 Experience, as will a live demo room called the Sound Options Experience. Sound Options is Almo’s dedicated audio sourcing and technical engineering group. New additions to the pavilion include ClearOne, Yamaha Unified Communications and MXL. Also featured is Ecler Audio, which is exclusively distributed in the U.S. by Almo.E4 Atlanta is on October 15 at The Hotel at Avalon in Alpharetta, Georgia and runs from 7:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. local time and are free, including parking, for Almo Pro A/V resellers, integrators and their end users. For more information, go here.last_img read more

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A Recap of LAVNCH EMEA’s ProAV Control Session

first_imgControl is an AV topic that doesn’t “show” its glitz and glamor to the masses — but it’s usually the technology doing the hard work in the background. Control is a critical component to successful AV systems, and today’s LAVNCH EMEA Control Session made sure to tell that story.Read on for the session recap.Leading the Control Session of ProAV Collaborative Day was Jeremy Wills of Futuresource. The session, “‘Can You See Me?’ Networked Devices, AV over IP, and the Rise of Cloud-Based Monitoring & Meeting Room Control Systems,” posed a few not-so-simple questions facing the industry:How do small meeting rooms and huddle spaces fit into the WPS (wireless presentation system) and VC (videoconferencing)? When and what features need to be included for customers?When are AV managed services needed, and when should manged services move from CapEx (capital expenditures) to OpEx (operating expenditures)? Where does control hardware fit into the AVaaS (AV-as-a-Service) model?What impact has the first eight months of 2020 had on the signal distribution, remote monitoring and room control sectors? Which changes are positive and negative?Wills’ breakdown of the market forecast in global video distribution:While the majority of solutions currently come from non-IP extension ports (i.e., the matrix switch), IP extension technologies (i.e., AV-over-IP) are set to grow and account for more than 20% of global video volumes (a predicted 3% growth) by 2023. Wills points out that AV-over-IP has gained most traction in the Americas, but it’s growing in the EMEA and APAC regions too.Some additional call-outs of trends in the control space:Meeting room control — convergence with VC/WPS: Meeting room control is quite saturated in the market as smaller meeting rooms and huddle spaces are driving demand for lower-cost solutions. A renewed focus on end users is driving down cost.AV managed services (AVMS) — adoption drivers: AV managed services are growing, with end users’ key desires including reduced time to start the meeting, reduced costs per space, the want for reduced (or zero) need for skilled in-house technicians, improved uptime (e.g., reliability), and analytics to maximize usage.Global AVMS revenue & meeting room penetration: AVMS global revenue — platform and services combined, mind you — will value at 50% of CAGR growth from 2019 to 2024, Futuresource expects. Wills predicts the market rising to more than $4B globally within only four more years.Remote monitoring — solutions are proliferating: Remote-monitoring solutions are growing fast. Some solutions still require relevant hardware, while display vendors are open to partnering with remote management and monitoring software companies too.After the analysis from Futuresource, our knowledgeable panel gathered ’round. Guests included TJ Adams of QSC, Justin Kennington of the SDVoE Alliance, Jonathan Mangnall of Utelogy and Stijn Ooms of Crestron.The theme: The world of networked devices is vast and can be confusing, especially when considering new and emerging technologies like AV-over-IP and cloud-based monitoring and control systems. Networked world devices — including local cloud servers, the WPS/VC crossover, PoE (Power over Ethernet), remote management, AV managed services and more — all have a role to play. One thing very much on our radar is room control systems and AV infrastructures: We’re seeing an end user desire for a single platform. So what does that mean for the channel?See related  Sessions We Loved from D=SIGN, Day 1Mangnall started, “We don’t see control as being a problem that most organizations have these days. … But we do see that organizations are moving away from proprietary systems.” This also means moving to systems that are more standards-based.Adding onto this, Ooms argued, “The IT team is used to open platforms, so we in the AV industry have to move onto that. … It’s not scalable how AV has been doing it the past 20 years.”Cost and scale will be a real factor here too, Mangnall pointed out: “It’s far too expensive to install, to maintain, to upgrade and update AV. … It’s just got to be simple and easy to support and maintain.”Part of the whole topic on what’s proprietary and what’s not gets blurry, Adams transitioned. “It’s sort of a blessing and a curse. A lot of end users want to standardize. … AV-over-IP has really shown well to the IT folks in that regard…,” he said.Justin Kennington added onto Adams’ claim around fuzziness of “what does proprietary really mean?” If you look outside of AV and look at the popular world of home automation, you could look at solutions as “platforms” — take Alexa or Google Home. These are large software platforms/frameworks first, and when you look inside, you’ll find varying technologies and feature sets within them, Kennington explained.“The final evolution of technology systems is into software,” Kennington noted. “We’re only just figuring that out in AV land. … [It’s like] a cell phone … do you want an iPhone or do you want an Android? That is 100% a software platform decision that you’re making first.”“We’ve seen in enterprise and higher education that control is left to the IT team, who are accustomed to industry standardizations. We as the ProAV industry have to adapt.” – @Crestron’s Stijn Ooms during the #ProAV Control Session of #LAVNCHEMEA. #AVtweeps #AVisLIFE pic.twitter.com/5vGcCWUyu3— rAVe [PUBS] (@rAVePubs) September 2, 2020Today’s control session brought forward many considerations in signal distribution, remote monitoring and room control. As we emerge at varying stages from COVID-19 lockdowns across the EMEA region, the impacts will come further to light.While adapting to the demands of both IT and end users, all this said — standardization, open APIs, managed services — Adams argued that we have to be careful as vendors not to get too focused on what IT wants, but to look at the bigger picture. Critical to all this, first, is the focus of the ProAV market to provide a first-class meeting experience.“Everyone’s pulling in a similar direction,” Chris Mcintyre-Brown of Futuresource concluded.If you missed ProAV Collaborative Day today and want to rewatch all the sessions, like this one, you can still register. While AVIXA CTS RUs are not available in the archives, you’ll still want to catch what you missed. Register for LAVNCH EMEA here, and let us know your favorite moments from the day on social.last_img read more

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December 1, 2013 Letters

first_img December 1, 2013 Letters Letters Lawyer Advertising   I am barraged by testimonial ads on TV. “I received $150,000 from my auto accident from attorney _____,” one after another. I do not see how these ads help any potential client make a decision on choosing an attorney. The testimony leaves out many material facts, such as policy limit, coverages that were available, extent and nature of injury, and whether that figure includes property damage and PIP, to name a few.  If the ad stated the client had received $150,000 by being paid the tortfeasor’s 100k liability policy limit and 50k from their own 50k UM coverage for a soft tissue injury with 4 percent permanency from a chiropractor, OK, that would tell the potential client that attorney has something to offer. Or, conversely, those two insurance adjusters are the ones he would want handling his claim.But is the client receiving $150,000 from a $1 million commercial trucking policy coverage with a $5 million excess policy behind it? And is that client a mother of four, age 32, now quadriplegic, and can no longer work at her $120,000 a year job? Then a potential client might say, “That attorney blew it!”I think it is a mistake for recovery figures to be quoted without a basis for the recovery being stated. I would urge the Bar to rethink testimonials in TV advertising. That or make the advertising attorney post on his website all the facts of the case along with contact information for his testifying client.Not to mention that advertising settlement dollar amounts confirm to the public that plaintiff attorneys are the aggressive riffraff that the defense bar and insurance companies claim we are.Plaintiff attorneys should instead be viewed by the public as the gatekeepers of justice, not the vultures of the courthouse. We should advertise how long we fought the defense; how we appealed the case, funding the appeal out of our own pocket; how we fought the good fight and spoke out eloquently on behalf of our clients, seeking justice, not pieces of silver. December 1, 2013 Letterscenter_img Frank Shaughnessy Palm Bay_________________I couldn’t help but notice the November 15 front page story regarding advertising rules and LinkedIn. While I am sure the Standing Committee on Advertising has done some valuable and important work for The Florida Bar over the years, it is sad to see such focus on relatively minor issues — like whether a social networking site mislabels specialties — while rampant, outrageous billboard and media advertising continues to be permitted in Florida for a whole range of flimsy “lawyer referral services” such as 800-411-PAIN and law firms who claim they are “aggressive” or showcase specific dollar awards and imply that similar results can be obtained for other Floridians.It would be refreshing indeed if our Florida Bar and its committees tackled the real, and politically difficult, issues that truly impact the reputation and image of the Bar, rather than spending time on issues that will make little to no difference to any of us.Chris Hinsley Miami Rethink the System? I scratch my head at the concept of the November 15 letter titled “Rethink the System.” The writer there would serve justice not by the adversarial system but by the scientific method. Huh? Does he suggest that every dispute be resolved by polygraph tests and arbitrators?Arbitrators are as subject to personal ideological conditioning as much as are judges, jurors, legislators, and litigants. And, for the most part, witnesses do not lie. The driver who insists that his speedometer showed him driving within the speed limit will believe what he says, just as a police officer is honest when he testifies that he has made hundreds of speeding stops and is accurate at estimating the speed of a moving vehicle. The scientist would call it a tie. The shooter will believe he is telling the truth when he claims that he feared for his life when he fired his weapon in self-defense, and the polygraph will support him. And what scientist can determine the true value of a work of art by a lesser known sculptor, in order to determine the proper degree of a larceny charge?True, money gives an advantage in litigation, but should the state government support less wealthy parties, or require the adverse party to do so, as professional sports leagues tax teams with the largest payroll? Totally unrelated to my personal political philosophy, I think not.Adapting Winston Churchill’s famous quotation about democracy, “The adversary system is the worst form of justice except for all those other forms that have been tried from time to time.”Alfred Sklaver Delray Beach Legal Discrimination I applaud the letter from Kellie Baker, in the November 1 News calling for the elimination of legal discrimination.In that same vein, I have two questions: Why are men ineligible for the “Women, Infants, Children” program? And why are only sons, and not daughters, required to register for the draft?Richard Katzman Campbell, CA___________________Recently, there have been several letters to the editor concerning the alleged discrimination of men-only divorce firms. I just would like to point out an interesting twist to the story. Here’s a law firm that I recently came across in downtown Orlando the other day: “Women’s Trial Group — Attorneys at Law.”The sign “Women’s” is pink.Luis Basagoitia Orlandolast_img read more

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After long and controversial journey, Olympic flame summits Mount Everest

first_imgAfter long and controversial journey, Olympic flame summits Mount EverestThe event provided organizers with a counterpoint to the pro-Tibet protests.May 9, 2008Jump to CommentsShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare via EmailPrint>BEIJING (AP) – Cheering mountaineers raised the Olympic torch at the summit of the world’s highest peak Thursday, producing the triumphant image that China has longed for in the run-up to the Beijing Olympics.The final ascent along Mount Everest’s icy ridge was broadcast live and provided organizers with a dramatic counterpoint to the pro-Tibet protests that marked parts of the torch’s international relay.“One World, One Dream,” team captain Nyima Cering, a Tibetan, yelled in English as his torch was lit a few yards from the summit – the slogan for the Beijing Olympics in August.The 19-member team, dressed in red parkas emblazoned with Olympic logos, broke camp at 27,390 feet before dawn and reached the top of the 29,035-foot mountain a little more than six hours later.The flame was passed up a line of five torchbearers to a Tibetan woman named Cering Wangmo on the summit. The other team members unfurled Chinese and Olympic flags as a Tibetan prayer flag lined the path and fluttered in the wind.The jubilant group clustered together, shouting in Chinese, “We made it,” and “Beijing welcomes you.”The emotional moment, shown on national TV, displayed teamwork and national pride among the Tibetan and ethnic Han Chinese mountaineers – and none of the anti-government sentiment or ethnic tensions that fueled recent protests in Lhasa and other Tibetan areas of western China.China Vice President Xi Jinping hailed the feat as “one of the greatest events in the history of Olympic Games and a precious gift given by the Chinese to the Olympics and people worldwide,” in comments carried by the official Xinhua News Agency.The Everest torch was separate from the main Olympic flame, which on Thursday was on the opposite side of China in the southeastern province of Guangdong. China had planned for the Beijing Olympics to be a showcase of its rapid development from impoverished agrarian nation to rising industrial power.Its preparations have been meticulous: building glittering new venues, modernizing Beijing and even ordering residents to stop bad behavior like spitting, littering and jumping in line.But taking the torch to the top of Everest had been criticized from the outset because of China’s often harsh rule over Tibet – where Everest is located on the border with Nepal – and the torch relay drew even more intense scrutiny after recent unrest in Tibet and Tibetan areas of western China.Tibetan activists continued to accuse Beijing of using the climb to symbolize its control over Tibet. China says it has ruled Tibet for centuries, although many Tibetans say their homeland was essentially independent for much of that time.“The Chinese government’s obsession with summiting Everest with the Olympic torch betrays the depth of its insecurity over its rule in Tibet which was so clearly challenged by Tibetans in March and April,” Tenzin Dorjee, deputy director of Students for a Free Tibet, said in a statement.Chinese officials and state media have tried to depict the climb as a demonstration of the Olympic spirit.The Chinese mountaineering team was predominantly Tibetan, with two of the five torchbearers Tibetan as well. Having a mixed team carry the flame to the peak of Everest helped China send a message of ethnic unity, analysts said.While the intended display of unity at Everest’s summit was not entirely convincing, it was a positive statement, said David Zweig, head of the Center on China’s Transnational Relations at Hong Kong’s University of Science and Technology.last_img read more

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The Science of Beer Goggles

first_imgThe Atlantic:A couple of scientists walked into a bar and … began posing moral quandaries. When they presented bar-goers with a version of the classic “trolley problem”—would you push a man in front of a train, killing him in order to save five track workers?—they found that the drunker people got, the more likely they were to say they’d push the man. Alcohol, the researchers observed, can make us more utilitarian in our reasoning.Read the whole story: The Atlanticlast_img

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Let’s be and sell what we are – Croats. It must be our tourism product

first_imgAccording to the world’s largest tour operator, the German TUI, the number of reservations in Germany for holidays in Croatia increased in June by as much as 26,4 percent compared to the same period last year.By the way, Germany is our main emitting market, and according to the Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS), last year in the structure of foreign overnight stays, most overnight stays were traditionally made by guests from Germany (23,9%), followed by guests from Slovenia (10,1%), Austria (9%), the Czech Republic and Italy (both 7,3%), Poland (6,6%), Slovakia (3,9, 3,8%), the Netherlands (3,7%), the United Kingdom (3,4%) and Hungary (79%), for a total of 21,0%. Tourists from other countries realized XNUMX% of tourist nights.The main reason for the increase in German interest in Croatia is the instability in Turkey, Greece and Egypt, and in addition to Croatia, Spain will also benefit. So, this year German tourists will visit our Adriatic like never before, and all previous data (in the first six months there were 4,8% more arrivals and 6,8% more tourist nights) as well as booking announcements show that we will to have a record tourist season and reach the “magic number” of eight billion euros in revenue.Will we know how to take advantage of the situation and get most of the 26 percent of new Germans to buy, buy, justify the expectations to come to the Adriatic next year as well? The problem of our tourism, as well as the reason for the weak pre- and post-season, is that our tourist product is still the sun and the sea. But I would personally highlight three main problems of our tourism as well as solutions.First and foremost we need to start respecting ourselves, selling ourselves and starting to sell indigenous tourist stories. When we arrange these three elements in our heads as well as in the field, only then can we start with strategies, promotion and quality development, ie we must finally start dealing with tourism through the strategic development of tourist destinations.But let’s go in order – If we look through the prism of tourism, we definitely do not respect or appreciate our culture, history and heritage, on the contrary, we seem to be ashamed of it. Paradoxically, this is precisely our strongest asset. The motive for coming is not accommodation, but a tourist destination. A tourist destination must begin to respect its customs, culture, identity and offer just that to guests as the main tourist product. It is the meaning of tourism, to experience and get to know new cultures and ways of life. Let us respect ourselves because that is the only way others will respect us.When we understand and arrange it, we finally have to be and sell what we are – Istrians, Dalmatians, Slavonians, Međimurje, Zagorje, Ličani…. Croats. Let’s be what we are – indigenous, authentic and credible! It’s a story we have to tell and it should be our main tourism product. At the end of it all we have to pack it all up nicely and start telling our indigenous and authentic stories. Tourism consists of emotions, experiences and stories. Let’s tell stories. Every region has so many amazing indigenous stories, we just have to tell them. That is the meaning of tourism.As a metaphor, I would like to point out the Germans who will come to the Croatian coast in record numbers this year.Let’s not sell German beer to Germans, let’s sell them top-quality Croatian craft beers. If Germans love and consume beer, and we all know they love it, why do we sell them their beer? They can drink their beer every day in Germany, they want to meet, taste and experience something new and indigenous – they want to try our beer, we sell them our top craft beers. If we are at the famous Oktoberfest, do we want to try Croatian beer or German? The answer is clear – German beer. That is the meaning of tourism.As for beer, this also applies to all our other products, customs, gastronomic delicacies that we must be proud of. Tourists want to get to know us, our culture, identity, history and way of life. Let’s be Croats and sell ourselves. Let us be what we are because that is exactly what tourists want to experience, taste and see.Tourism consists of emotions, experiences and stories. Let’s tell stories.PS Finally, look at an example of how to sell figs, make figs and make a tourist product out of it. This is one of the best tourist stories and the very essence of tourism, right on the right track of everything I mentioned above. Stories like this must be our main tourist product.last_img read more

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