Medics Treat Man who Shot Himself while Dislodging Bullet with Screwdriver

first_imgHARRISON, Mich. — A Harrison man attempting to dislodge a bullet from his .22-caliber rifle with a screwdriver shot himself in the shoulder Sunday, Clare County Sheriff’s officials say. Medics treated the 40 year old, who lives on Helen in Hayes Township, and airlifted him to Spectrum Health Butterworth Hospital in Grand Rapids, where officials say he is in stable condition.last_img

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OUT IN THE YARD: Texas Master Gardeners Conference stresses need for ‘earth-kind’ gardening

first_img Contact  Jefferson County Master Gardener Eileen Slater at enslater@gmail.com  or call the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service at (409) 835-8461. By Eileen SlaterAt  the 2016 Texas Master Gardeners Conference  in McKinney, Texas, we visited  Myers Park  to learn about the new types of gardens springing up  in Texas. They are Earth-Kind gardens. Earth-Kind garden techniques include techniques that everyone can use in their garden or lawn for conserving resources and maintaining a healthy environment.These principles include water conservation, reduction of fertilizer and pesticide use, landscaping for energy conversation and reduction of landscape wastes entering landfills. Typical Earth-Kind landscaping plants for our region include, but are not limited to Shumard and most Oak trees, Blue Plumbagos, Split Leaf Philodendron, Perennial Fountain Grass, Monkey Grass, Bougainvillea, Chinese Holly, Carolina Jessamine, Dwarf Pampas Grass, Salvias or Sages, Common Pear,  Southern and other Magnolias, Turk’s Cap, Yellow Bells and English Ivy.   Earth-Kind roses include, but are not limited to  Marie Daly, Caldwell Pink, Belinda’s Dream and Knock Out.  Google Earth-Kind Plant Selector to find more interesting Earth-Kind plants.The  Earth-Kind technique on making and using a rain barrel is tentatively scheduled this fall by the JCMG. A great opportunity to showcase your produce is Saturday, June 11, at the Jefferson County Fruit and Vegetable Show in Central Mall. Bring your entries from 9 a.m. to noon. For more information, call  (409) 835-8461.center_img During  a walk through the gardens,  an Earth-Kind specialist explained that  the following procedures are used to maintain the gardens in McKinney: once a year watering, no pesticides (except for fire ants), no fertilizers, no deadheading and limited pruning. This is partly achieved by adding three inches of compost to the soil and mulching with three inches of compost.Earth-Kind plants are incorporated in the perennial garden, herb garden, vineyard, vegetable garden, kitchen potager garden, crape myrtle garden and shade garden in McKinney. Many plants in these gardens are common and easily recognized.How we can we incorporate an earth-kind garden and landscape in our area? Add three inches of native hardwood mulch to help decrease water needed in the landscape. Place a drip irrigation system underneath the mulch. Use a low volume irrigation system and apply water only where it is needed. Compost non-diseased leaves, grass clippings and pruning waste. Use pest and disease tolerant plants. Preserve pest’s natural enemies. Collect and store rainwater to reduce your water bill. Evaluate your irrigation system for leaks and damaged sprinkler heads. Program your irrigation system to split run time into several shorter cycles to save substantial amounts of water. Incorporate three  inches of finished plant-derived compost into the soil. Keep your grass mowed to a reasonable height. Leave grass clippings and leaves on  your lawn as they add nitrogen for fertilizer. If you fertilize, choose one based on soil tests.last_img read more

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Former deputy constable charged with official oppression

first_img Yowman made a statement to law enforcement regarding the incident.He was placed on administrative leave after the alleged incident and resigned on Aug. 1. A former Jefferson County chief deputy constable accused of using a stun gun on a man then driving away has been charged with official oppression, a misdemeanor charge.Ken Yowman, 54, turned himself into the Jefferson County Correctional Facility last week where he posted a $10,000 bond and was released.According to the affidavit for arrest, Port Arthur Police Department received a call on May 8 from Deven Taylor, a who said a stun gun had been used on him. The victim, who was interviewed while at a local hospital, told police that at around 10:45 p.m. May 7 he was walking near the Prince Hall Apartment Complex near the 800 block of West 14th Street when he was approached by a law enforcement officer who later identified himself as Ken Yowman , deputy constable for the precinct No. 8 office.“Yowman proceeded to Tase Taylor and drive away. Yowman failed to arrest Taylor, see to his medical needs, or note the use of force in an offense report in a timely manner,” according to the document.Evidence was found to corroborate Taylor’s account, which included video surveillance from the apartment complex.last_img read more

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Seventh Generation: Thyme for new disinfectant

first_imgSeventh Generation,Vermont Business Magazine Seventh Generation, a Burlington-based leading household and personal care products company and pioneer in the environmentally conscious products space, today announced the launch of Seventh Generation Disinfectant Spray. Seventh Generation’s new Disinfectant Spray kills 99.99% of bacteria and viruses(1) using CleanWell technology, a disinfectant formula based on thyme oil.The new products eliminate odors and feature scents made with essential oils and botanical extracts; available in three SKUs: Lavender Vanilla & Thyme Scent, Fresh Citrus & Thyme Scent, and Eucalyptus, Spearmint & Thyme Scent. With this product, there is no rinse required after use, even on food contact surfaces, a unique attribute in the category. The spray is also non-flammable and powered by compressed air, utilizing continuous 360 degrees spray technology that won’t lose pressure.”Seventh Generation has always believed that every element of our products should keep the wellbeing of our customers in mind,” said Joey Bergstein, COO of Seventh Generation. “Our new disinfectant sprays are no different; we went through extensive work to ensure we were putting together a botanically based spray we can feel good about people using in their homes.”The new disinfectant is appropriate for use in homes and is effective at killing viruses specifically: Rhinovirus type 37 (the common cold virus) and Influenza A viruses, including H1N1. It’s also effective at killing bacteria, specifically: Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella enterica, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Escherichia coli.Seventh Generation has long believed that consumers have a right to know what is inside the cleaning products they use. While it is not required by U.S. law, Seventh Generation lists ingredients on all their cleaning product labels, including fragrance ingredients. Seventh Generation has extended this practice to the new line of Disinfectant Sprays. In addition to the disclosure of the active ingredient (as required by law) the formula’s other ingredients, including fragrance ingredients, are voluntarily listed on the product labels.The new disinfectant sprays are currently rolling out nationwide at CVS Pharmacy, Target, grocery and natural food stores. For more information about Seventh Generation, please visit www.seventhgeneration.com(link is external).About Seventh Generation For over 20 years, it’s been Seventh Generation’s mission to help you protect your world with our environmentally conscious and effective household products. Our products are solutions for the air, surfaces, fabrics, pets and people within your home — and for the community and environment outside of it. Seventh Generation offers a full line of laundry, dish and household cleaners, baby products including Free & Clear diapers, training pants and baby wipes, plus recycled paper products and recycled plastic trash bags, and feminine care products including Organic certified tampons. The company derives its name from the Great Law of the Iroquois Confederacy that states, “In our every deliberation, we must consider the impact of our decisions on the next seven generations.” For information on Seventh Generation cleaning, paper, baby and feminine personal care products, to find store locations, and explore the company’s website visit www.seventhgeneration.com(link is external). To read more about Seventh Generation’s corporate responsibility, visit the Corporate Consciousness Report at: www.7genreport.com(link is external).Source: BURLINGTON, VT–(Marketwired – August 17, 2017) – Seventh Generation(link is external). (1) Kills over 99.99% of household germs, specifically: Influenza A virus, H1N1, Rhinovirus type 37, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella enterica, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli.last_img read more

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Family accommodation – an ace up the sleeve of Croatian tourism

first_img“Croatia is expecting another record season!”, “German tourists are arriving in even greater numbers!”, “Scandinavians have rediscovered Croatia!”, “Korean tourists have flooded Dubrovnik and Split!”. These are all these days and more than the usual headlines of articles on Internet portals and front pages of print newspapers…There is no doubt – Croatia is a tourist hit and there are no indications that this could change so quickly. Unique geographically solid road infrastructure and still mostly untouched nature (at least something useful from our sluggish bureaucracy) – all this has positioned Croatia at the very top of the world tourist map where it seriously competes with tourist megapowers like Spain, Italy and France. Croatia these days seems to be doing well, some will go so far as to claim that the favorable wind in our backs is given by geopolitical turmoil and security threats that have turned many until recently popular Mediterranean tourist oases into risky destinations reached only by the greatest adventurers and hunters. to extreme discounts.The tourism sector is already in a hurry to prepare for the imminent start of the pre-season, and one of the biggest “players” in the Croatian tourism market is extremely scattered, but collectively it forms the backbone of the domestic tourist offer. Clearly, we are talking about private tourist accommodation. The boom of private tourist accommodation is visible at every step throughout the Adriatic. Large apartments are being converted into several smaller ones, garages and business premises are being converted into small apartments and it is almost difficult to find a piece of free space that is not in the function of a room or apartment for tourist rent. So far on the Adriatic, but increasingly on the continent.Our ancestors certainly did not plan is that their “zimmer frei” cry for the German brand at bus stops will turn into a global tourist trend that is part of an even bigger movement better known as sharing economy i.e., sharing economies. A good part of the population of Western Europe today, more than ever, replaces expensive hotel accommodation with cheaper, more affordable and in many ways better quality – private accommodation. Not to mention Americans, for them private accommodation is a real hit, something new, exciting and trendy. Cool millennials today snort at the memory of expensive hotels and hotel resorts, and their eyes are wide open to the memory of an authentic local experience in the local neighborhood where it is possible to experience a piece of everyday life of the local population more than anywhere else. Here’s even the infamous Wall Street giant, Goldman Sachs, concludes in one recent study that “whoever experiences private accommodation – finds it difficult to return to the hotel.”Photo: Kvarner.hrHere, too, Croatia is again in a great position. Today, private accommodation holds a share of almost 50 percent in the total accommodation capacity of Croatian tourism with an annual income which, according to conservative estimates, reaches a revenue of 1,4 billion. euros. Such an unusual balance of power between private and hotel accommodation is really hard to find in any other Mediterranean country we like to compare ourselves to. But this rarity is actually a good thing, the mentality and historical – economic circumstances fascinated by owning their own property ensures that many today maintain a standard of living, and individuals have turned renting accommodation into, by all criteria, a serious business.And what does the future hold for private accommodation? Numerous challenges, but also opportunities for even greater utilization of existing tourist capacities with maximum engagement in the extension of the tourist season, which outside large tourist destinations is difficult to go beyond 60-90 daily limits.Compared to a few years ago, the Croatian private tourist accommodation sector has made a huge step forward in terms of offer and quality of accommodation itself, so that the average apartment in a Croatian coastal city today can rightfully compete with popular world destinations. You don’t believe it? Keyboard in hand and Google… In addition, despite the occasional failures (with a lot of hype, the concept of “scattered hotels” proved to be such) in the strategy, Croatian renters are well connected, professionally represented and their interest is well represented through numerous national and local institutions and associations.The rapid development and opening of new tourist accommodation at every step is largely due to services such as Booking.com and Airbnb, which on the wings of the aforementioned sharing economy are growing at an unprecedented rate and causing new tourist trends today and tomorrow. On the other hand – the mentioned services have completely monopolized the market, at least when it comes to accommodation for individual tourists. The global hotel industry has been struggling for a long time with complete dependence on booking portals and large Internet agencies, and similar problems will soon become more present in the segment of private accommodation, which will have to find a way to regain control over part of revenue and its own business through individual branding and creating your own direct marketing and sales channels.Undoubtedly, private accommodation remains the flagship of the domestic tourist offer until further notice, and judging by the ratings that tourists leave on the Internet – Croatian renters are doing a damn good job Published by: Jasmin Hadžić is a co-founder of the company VIDIMedia and tourist service VIDIA apartments which allows renters of private accommodation to easily and affordably create websites to promote rooms, apartments or villas and receive direct reservations without the mediation of booking portals and agencies.last_img read more

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Letter To The Editor: Let’s Lay Cause Of Mass Shootings Where It Belongs … Violent Videos; Permissive Parenting

first_imgBy PAM PRICHARDLos AlamosPeople cite readily available guns and mental illnesses as the causes of mass shootings, but has anyone ever considered the effects of the violent shoot-em-up video games that our youth have been playing for years? I believe there is a direct correlation, but no one ever mentions that possibility, and no one has investigated the number of hours, days, weeks, months and years that these shooters spent killing people virtually, on the computer screen, before they went out and killed people for real.Let’s lay the cause of mass shootings where it belongs – at the feet of the designers, programmers, and marketers of these video games!And also, on the parents who allowed their sons unlimited access to them!last_img read more

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Moratorium Proposed For Bridgehampton

first_imgCandy Kitchen. Independent/Stephen J. KotzMain Street development in Bridgehampton could come to a halt while the Southampton Town Board works on the specifics of a proposed historic district in the hamlet. Supervisor Jay Schneiderman this week asked the town board to consider a six-month moratorium, which could possibly be extended, while the town creates a boundary map and receives an advisory report from the Landmarks & Historic Districts Board.“I think if we’re going to do this, we have to maintain integrity,” Schneiderman said. “So, I’m asking that a draft moratorium be written up so we can approve any future development or redevelopment, so it can be in line with what we’re looking to do in the future.”Essentially, the town would like to see historic buildings in the hamlet, founded in 1656, be preserved and would offer owners tax benefits if they agreed to meet certain criteria when applying to renovate their buildings. Existing buildings with no historical significance, referred to as “noncontributing,” would still have to meet design guidelines, as would any new construction proposed.“I want this to happen,” Schneiderman said. “I want to have a hearing and let everyone in the district know that we are contemplating enacting this and see what guidelines they can live with — what they are okay with, what they’re not.”Ed Wesnofske, chairman of the town Landmarks & Historic Districts Board, and Julie Greene, town historian who has also been the Bridgehampton Museum and Historical Society’s curator and archivist for the last 15 years, presented the idea of a historic district to the town board on Thursday, December 6.“This is about preserving the architecture, the look and feel of Main Street,” Wesnofske said.The Bridgehampton resident said rules would apply to exterior appearance of structures, not internal. Demolitions would also have to be reviewed. If, in fact, a structure is deemed no longer viable for economic activity and rehabilitation, it could be torn down, but it would be a public process.Greene pointed out that almost every building on Main Street has some sort of significance, from the 1840 Nathaniel Rogers and 1842 Topping Rose houses on the east side of the business district, to the 1815 Bridgehampton Methodist Church and 1840 Corwith House on the west.“These are historical gateways,” she said. “Just about everything on Main Street has some historic significance. The town’s continued dedication to preservation has included lively reuse of many of these downtown structures.”Other converted structures of value include the 1907 D. L. Chester Dry Goods Store, which is now Almond restaurant; the Corwith House that is now part of the Bridgehampton Museum; the 1795 Boxwood Inn that is now the Bridgehampton Inn; and the 1900 Henry H. Chatfield House, which was once owned by a prominent lawyer in the area, that is now Blue One.Many original structures still stand as they did, such as the 1910 St. Ann’s Episcopal Church, which was originally the Sagaponack Golf Course clubhouse before being moved to its current site. The rectory was built in 1899 and moved to the church grounds around 1913. The parish hall was added in 1915. The Bridgehampton Presbyterian Church was built in 1842, and townspeople were burying their dead in the cemetery next-door long before that. Candy Kitchen, built in 1925, used to be a free-standing structure. Farmers used to have a key and would arrive before 5 AM to make the morning coffee. The Hampton Library, where Greene used to work as a local history librarian, was the only library east of Brooklyn when it was established in 1877.Bridgehampton road races used to cross a finish line on Main Street in front of the former Sanford Water Building, which was built in 1911. Bridgehampton is the only East End hamlet that had road racing, which followed on the heels of the Vanderbilt Cup races earlier in the 20th Century. Racing was revived again in 1943 before the state banned the practice. The will soon erect a historic marker, commemorating Bridgehampton’s racing heritage.The hamlet has other historic sites, including the 1910 Bridgehampton Monument, which commemorates the nation’s wars, and the triangular commons, known as Militia Green off Main Street, where soldiers drilled during the American Revolution. Architectural elements in the area range from Greek revival, Victorian, and Queen Anne style.Wesnofske said education should be the first step and that the town should solicit the opinions of residents and property owners. He said he’s hoping to borrow historic guidelines from East Hampton, which has several historic districts. To become a historic district, the town needs to receive signatures from at least 20 percent of property owners. Town Planning and Development Administrator Kyle Collins said guidelines exist under Chapter 330, in terms of criteria for public hearings and building guidelines moving forward. All will be detailed at a future date, once all details are finalized.There’s potential for the town to vote on the proposal if the 20 percent threshold is not met, but board members are hoping not to go that route. “You want a buy-in from the people that you’re imposing this on,” Councilwoman Christina Preston Scalera said, and Councilman John Bouvier agreed. “I’m not saying it’s mandatory that you have every single person, but you certainly want the bulk of them to be supportive. And I think they’ll see the value in this.”desiree@indyeastend.com Sharelast_img read more

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Courage under fire

first_imgTo continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe now for unlimited access Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

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Insolvency and adjudication

first_imgTo continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe now for unlimited access Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

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