Factor001 official specification released

first_imgThe Factor001 team at bf1systems has released its official specification document for the advanced Factor001s (standard) and Factor001e (electronic) road bikes. This document details all of the technical specifications of both the standard and electronic version of this truly modern training aid for the serious athlete.Billed as ‘the most advanced bicycle in the world’, the specification document is split into two sections. The Factor001s specification details all of the frame geometry and components. The Factor001e specification details the full system highlights and electronic instrumentation on this bicycle.www.factor001.com Relatedlast_img read more

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Full refunds as 2020 Prudential RideLondon festival of cycling is cancelled

first_imgIt has been confirmed today (Wednesday 20 May) that the 2020 Prudential RideLondon festival of cycling in the UK capital has been cancelled. This decision has been taken by London authorities after engagement with partners involved in the planning of the event.The eighth edition of ‘the world’s greatest festival of cycling’ was scheduled to take place on the weekend of 15-16 August. It was scheduled to feature four mass participation events: the Prudential RideLondon-Surrey 19, 46 and 100 sportives, plus Prudential RideLondon FreeCycle, a free-for-all event that invites cyclists to pedal round seven miles of traffic-free roads in central London.The festival was also due to feature two professional races: the UCI WorldTour Prudential RideLondon-Surrey Classic and Prudential RideLondon Classique, in addition to the Prudential RideLondon Cycling Show at ExCeL London and the Brompton World Championship Final.Hugh Brasher, Event Director of Prudential RideLondon, said “We know how disappointing this news will be to the tens of thousands of riders who were hoping to participate in one of the fantastic events in the world’s greatest festival of cycling, for the thousands of charities that would have benefited from fundraising and for the world’s best professional cyclists who love racing on the streets of London and Surrey, but I am sure everyone will understand why this decision has been made.“All participants and charities that bought places in the 2020 Prudential RideLondon will be refunded their entry fee in full.“We are currently working with Prudential and the Mayor’s Office to see how we can celebrate the event weekend of 15 and 16 August.“2021 will be the first year of a new contract to deliver RideLondon and, with the current unknowns about the short-term future for mass participation events and the importance of inspiring as many people as possible to cycle more often, we’re taking the opportunity to fully review the format and timing of the event over the next few months.”Will Norman, the London Mayor’s Walking & Cycling Commissioner, said “RideLondon has been one of the highlights of the capital’s event calendar for the last seven years, so it is obviously disappointing that it cannot be staged this year.“This summer we hope that millions of Londoners will alter their travel habits by making journeys by bike instead of driving or using public transport. But it is absolutely the right decision to cancel this year’s event to ensure the safety of everyone involved and we all look forward to welcoming RideLondon back again in the near future.”He continued, “The Mayor and I would like to thank Prudential, in their final year as title sponsors, for their support over the last seven years. We are already excited about the next RideLondon event.”In its first seven editions, Prudential RideLondon has become the world’s greatest festival of cycling, with 100,000 riders of all ages and abilities participating in seven different events on traffic-free roads in London and Surrey. It has inspired hundreds of thousands of people to take up cycling or cycle more often and a total of more than £77 million has been raised for thousands of charities.Event Director Hugh Brasher added “We know that there will be many, many questions from riders, charities and others and we ask you to please bear with us as we work through all the detail. We expect to be in a position to provide full updates to participants and charities by the middle of June. We will also post regular updates on our website and social media channels.”www.prudentialridelondon.co.uk Relatedlast_img read more

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Goldberg wins Bar Journal writing award

first_imgGoldberg wins Bar Journal writing award G oldberg wins Bar Journal writing award Fred O. Goldberg was selected as the recipient of the 2011 Florida Bar Journal Excellence in Writing Award by the Journal & News Editorial Board for his article “Enforcement of Settlements: A Jurisdictional Perspective” (July/Aug 2011).Each year, a committee of the editorial board selects a recipient of the award based on the writing quality, substance, difficulty, and style of the article.Goldberg is a shareholder with Berger Singerman’s dispute resolution team in Miami. His practice concentrates in complex commercial litigation in state and federal courts, including real estate and mortgage-related disputes, jurisdictional and venue issues, and domestic and international arbitrations and appeals. He received his undergraduate degree from Brandeis University and his J.D. from Suffolk University Law School.The article is available on the Journal ’s website, www.floridabar.org/journal. June 15, 2012 Regular Newslast_img read more

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Study shows beneficial effects of blocking brain inflammation in an experimental model of Alzheimer’s

first_imgShare Email Share on Facebook Pinterest Share on Twittercenter_img A University of Southampton-led study has found that blocking a receptor in the brain responsible for regulating immune cells could protect against the memory and behaviour changes seen in the progression of Alzheimer’s disease.The research, published today in the journal Brain, was jointly funded by the MRC (Medical Research Council) and Alzheimer’s Research UK.It was originally thought that Alzheimer’s disease disturbs the brain’s immune response, but this latest study adds to evidence that inflammation in the brain can in fact drive the development of the disease. The findings suggest that by reducing this inflammation, progression of the disease could be halted. LinkedIn The team hope the discovery will lead to an effective new treatment for the disease, for which there is currently no cure.The researchers at the University of Southampton used tissue samples from healthy brains and those with Alzheimer’s, both of the same age. The researchers counted the numbers of a particular type of immune cell, known as microglia, in the samples and found that these were more numerous in the brains with Alzheimer’s disease. In addition, the activity of the molecules regulating the numbers of microglia correlated with the severity of the disease.The researchers then studied these same immune cells in mice which had been bred to develop features of Alzheimer’s. They wanted to find out whether blocking the receptor responsible for regulating microglia, known as CSF1R, could improve cognitive skills. They gave the mice oral doses of an inhibitor that blocks CSF1R and found that it could prevent the rise in microglia numbers seen in untreated mice as the disease progressed. In addition, the inhibitor prevented the loss of communication points between the nerve cells in the brain associated with Alzheimer’s, and the treated mice demonstrated fewer memory and behavioural problems compared with the untreated mice.Importantly, the team found the healthy number of microglia needed to maintain normal immune function in the brain was maintained, suggesting the blocking of CSF1R only reduces excess microglia.What the study did not find is a correlated reduction of the number of amyloid plaques in the brain, a characteristic feature of Alzheimer’s disease. This supports previous studies that argue other factors may play more of role in cognitive decline.Dr Diego Gomez-Nicola, lead author of the study and an MRC New Investigator Research Grant (NIRG) fellow at the University of Southampton, said: “These findings are as close to evidence as we can get to show that this particular pathway is active in the development of Alzheimer’s disease.“The next step is to work closely with our partners in industry to find a safe and suitable drug that can be tested to see if it works in humans.”Dr Rob Buckle, director of science programmes at the MRC, added: “It is increasingly clear that inflammation is a key player in a number of neurodegenerative conditions and this study is beginning to unravel the biological processes behind this link.“The study is an excellent example of how basic research can lead to promising partnerships with industry that could be of real benefit for those with dementia.”Dr Simon Ridley, Director of Research at Alzheimer’s Research UK, said: “This work, looking at the role of the immune system in Alzheimer’s disease, suggests that blocking the action of the CSF1R protein in mice could help limit the damaging effects of inflammation and protect against symptoms like memory loss. In the last few years, scientists in Southampton have been at the forefront of research into the role of the immune system in Alzheimer’s, so it is encouraging to see this study taking these ideas forward by identifying a specific mechanism that could be a target for future treatments.“Alzheimer’s Research UK is delighted to be supporting the next phase of this work as the researchers seek to build on these findings and develop drugs that could block the action of CSF1R in people. Research like this is vital as there are currently no treatments that can stop or slow the progression of Alzheimer’s in the brain. We desperately need to see greater investment in research, if we are to find new ways to help the tens of thousands of people who develop Alzheimer’s in this country every year.”Dr Gomez-Nicola and his colleagues at the University of Southampton will continue their work with funding from the Dementia Consortium – a collaboration between Alzheimer’s Research UK, MRC Technology and pharmaceutical companies, Eisai and Lilly.last_img read more

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News Scan for Mar 23, 2016

first_imgBrazil microcephaly total grows; WHO unveils interim lab guidanceIn Zika virus developments today, Brazil’s health ministry reported 273 more suspected microcephaly cases and the World Health Organization (WHO) released interim guidance on lab testing for Zika infection.In a weekly update, Brazilian officials said that the number of new cases pushes the overall number of suspected cases still under investigation to 4,293, according to a statement translated and posted by Avian Flu Diary, an infectious disease news blog.The ministry said 53 more microcephaly cases were confirmed last week, raising that total to 907. In addition, investigators ruled out 128 additional earlier reported suspected cases.At a WHO media briefing yesterday, Anthony Costello, MD, director of the WHO’s maternal, newborn, child, and adolescent health department, said most of the microcephaly cases are from northeastern Brazil and that about 39% of suspected cases are confirmed. At that rate he estimated that the number of microcephaly cases could reach about 2,500 by the end of the year, according to currently available data.Mar 23 Avian Flu Diary postThe WHO, meanwhile, said its 5-page interim guidance document on Zika testing was developed by an international expert group that met by teleconference on Feb 18. The group said during outbreaks, especially where transmission is widespread, testing every suspected case will not be cost effective and that certain groups should be prioritized.They include pregnant women with a history of travel to affected areas or who had sexual contact with a confirmed or probable case, patients with suspected neurologic disorders, those who had sexual contact with a suspected or confirmed case, pregnant women whose fetuses have brain abnormalities, babies in affected areas born with brain defects or to women with a history of travel to affected areas, infants born to infected mothers (especially if breastfeeding), and stillbirths or miscarriages in women who lived in or traveled to Zika-hit areas.Mar 23 WHO interim lab testing guidance Twelve sepsis deaths noted in Guadeloupe chikungunya outbreakScientists from the Guadeloupe island group, writing in Emerging Infectious Diseases yesterday, reported 25 cases of severe sepsis and 12 associated deaths likely attributable to chikungunya infection during a 2014 outbreak.Of 110 non-pregnant adults hospitalized with chikungunya in 2014, 42 had infections resulting in failure of one or more organs or intensive care unit admission. More than half of patients with severe illness (25, or 59.5%) progressed to sepsis or septic shock, and 12 died.Patients with severe infections were more likely to have acute cardiac failure and organ dysfunction, in addition to higher white blood cell counts and higher enzyme levels indicating tissue damage compared with patients who had less severe illnesses.No cause other than chikungunya infection was identified in the 25 patients who progressed to severe sepsis or septic shock. Septic patients were more likely to have presented with cardiac, respiratory, and renal signs and symptoms upon admission, the researchers said. The mortality rate was much higher among septic patients (48%) than in patients with less severe illness (3%).The researchers noted the rarity of septic shock triggered by a viral illness, saying that sepsis could be a significant complication of severe chikungunya infection. Guadeloupe experienced a chikungunya outbreak from February to November 2014, during which approximately 40% of the islands’ population were infected, or 160,000 people.Mar 22 Emerg Infect Dis study Study notes difference in bacteria strains, clinical disease in US, European LymeStrains of Borrelia burgdorferi—the bacterium that causes Lyme disease—vary from Europe to the United States and cause more severe disease in US cases, according to a study yesterday in Emerging Infectious Diseases.Slovenian and US researchers analyzed B burgdorferi sensu stricto isolates from European and US patients who had the erythema migrans rash, which is characteristic of Lyme, though not all patients develop it. They studied 29 Slovenian and 91 US samples. Genotyping of the isolates revealed two distinct genotypes.In addition, the investigators found that clinical features of the Slovenian patients were similar to infection with B afzelii or B garinii, the other two Borrelia species that cause Lyme disease in Europe. B burgdorferi strains from the United States, in comparison, were associated with more severe disease.The team also found that US B burgdorferi strains induced blood cells to secrete higher levels of cytokines and chemokines associated with innate and Th1-adaptive immune responses, whereas European strains induced greater Th17-associated responses.Mar 22 Emerg Infect Dis studylast_img read more

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NNSA: Team At Los Alamos Recognized With Department Of Energy’s 2020 Project Management Achievement Award

first_imgNNSA News:WASHINGTON, D.C. — The U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) has announce that the Low Level Liquid Waste Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been awarded the Department’s Project Management Achievement Award.The award commends the Low Level Liquid Waste Project Team for delivering a state-of-the-art facility that will meet mission need to treat radioactive low level liquid waste for the next several decades. As a result of the perseverance, attention to detail, and focus on cost and schedule outcomes, the project team was able to overcome logistical hurdles and initial performance issues to successfully deliver the project in a safe and effective manner. While presenting the award to the Project Team during her visit to LANL, NNSA Administrator Lisa E. Gordon-Hagerty remarked, “Eric Trujillo and his team have encountered more than a few significant technical and logistical challenges during the Low Level Liquid Waste Project development. Yet by building a strong, dedicated integrated team and through his effective leadership, Eric and his team successfully completed this critical project in a safe and effective manner. Eric and his team epitomize what we mean when we say the Nuclear Security Enterprise’s greatest asset is our people, and are part of the reason why I’m so optimistic about NNSA’s next 20 years.”The project included the design and construction of a single-story reinforced concrete building, approximately 8,000 square feet, to house the processing equipment for treating up to 5 million liters of low level liquid waste per year. The project team includes NNSA Federal Project Director Eric Trujillo; NNSA Contracting Officer Robert Poole; LANS Project Manager Rebecca Spiva and LANL Operations Manager LLW Alvin Aragon.Click here to learn more about NNSA’s Acquisition and Project Management.last_img read more

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Trouble for Spanish giant Metrovacesa

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Judge Sides With Rowan, Development Can Begin

first_imgMarc Rowan plans to build three resort-style structures on this property just west of the Montauket, overlooking Fort Pond Bay. Independent/T. E. McMorrowMarc Rowan, the billionaire cofounder of the private equity firm Apollo Global Management, can develop his Montauk property at 80 Firestone Road facing Fort Pond Bay as planned. A New York State Supreme Court justice rejected an East Hampton Town Zoning Board of Appeals finding that a ridge of land running perpendicular to the water constituted a bluff.Rowan had first come before the town’s planning board with a design by architect Viola Rouhani of Stelle Lomont Rouhani Architects that called for the replacement of the property’s four roughly 400-square-foot single-story cottages, built in 1960, with two significantly larger two-story houses, along with a third larger one-story cottage. Each structure would have its own pool. The layout of the structures, Rouhani told the planning board, was staggered, meaning all three had views of the bay.Before anything could happen on the property, though, the nature of a ridge of land had to be determined. If it was a bluff, setback variances would be needed. If not, no variances would be required.Anne Glennon, the town’s head building inspector, agreed with the planning department’s finding that the ridge was, indeed, a bluff. Rowan challenged that decision before the ZBA.There was a caveat with that challenge, however: John Whelan, the ZBA’s chairman, works with Rouhani’s firm, and recused himself from the matter. While New York State code allows towns to have alternate members for appointed boards like the ZBA, there is no such provision in the East Hampton Town code. That meant four members would weigh the question. Because it was an appeal of a decision, a majority of the board would have to find for Rowan.Instead, the board deadlocked on the question, 2-2, leaving the building inspector’s decision standing. In 2017, the board agreed to reopen the hearing when Joel Halsey, one of Rowan’s representatives, came forward with new documentation addressing the question. The new documents led to the same result. Rowan’s appeal was denied.Rowan than sued in New York State Supreme Court. There, Justice Joseph Pastoressa acted as tie-breaker. The town, in upholding the building inspector’s decision, argued that while the topographical feature in question did not face the bay, there were wetlands nearby. “There is no evidence that the wetlands are sufficient to constitute a body of water,” the court found. “Any ambiguities in a zoning ordinance must be resolved in favor of the property owner,” Justice Pastoressa wrote in his July 16 decision, finding for Rowan.Rowan has invested heavily in Montauk properties over the past several years. He owns Duryea’s dock, for which a proposed expansion has been tabled for the past few years. He owns other properties facing Fort Pond, including the one in question, as well as the old Neptune Motel in downtown Montauk, where he houses his summer employees.t.e@indyeastend.com Sharelast_img read more

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Exciting horizons for industrial gases – an encouraging second session

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

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Airgas announces National Branch winners

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

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