Kiplinger names Saint Michael’s College a 2016 ‘Best College Value’

first_imgSaint Michael’s College,Vermont Business Magazine Saint Michael’s College has been named to Kiplinger’s Personal Finance’s list of the Top 300 Best College Values of 2016. Introduced in 1998, the rankings highlight public schools, private universities and private liberal arts colleges that combine outstanding academics with affordable cost. In addition, Kiplinger has ranked the top 100 best values in each category. Saint Michael’s made the magazine’s list of “100 best values in private universities.”Kiplinger assesses value by measurable standards of academic quality and affordability. Quality measures include the admission rate, the percentage of students who return for sophomore year, the student-faculty ratio and four-year graduation rate. Cost criteria include sticker price, financial aid and average debt at graduation.Saint Michael’s campus. Photo courtesy St Mike’s by Jeff Clark.“We start with a universe of 1,200 schools, so each school on our rankings, from number 1 to number 300, is a best value,” said Janet Bodnar, Editor of Kiplinger’s Personal Finance magazine. “Families can use the list as a starting point and then tailor it to each student’s preference for such things as size, location, campus culture and major.”At Kiplinger.com, visitors have access to the “Find the Best College for You” tool and other tools that let readers sort by admission rate, average debt at graduation and other criteria for all schools, plus in-state and out-of-state cost for public universities. Also online: slide shows of the top ten schools in different categories, archives of past years’ rankings and an FAQ on the ranking methodology.The complete rankings are now available online at Kiplinger.com/links/college and will appear in print in the February 2016 issue of Kiplinger’s Personal Finance, on newsstands January 5.About Saint Michael’s CollegeSaint Michael’s College, founded on principles of social justice and compassion, is a selective, fully residential Catholic college in Vermont’s beautiful Green Mountains. Our closely connected community delivers internationally-respected liberal arts and graduate education near Burlington, one of the country’s best college towns.  To prepare for fulfilling careers and meaningful lives, young adults here grow intellectually, socially, and morally, learning to be responsible for themselves, each other and their world.last_img read more

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Southminster Presbyterian’s ‘Journey to Bethlehem’ brings Christmas story to life Friday and Saturday

first_imgA vendor offers fish in the Jerusalem market in one of the early scenes from the production.Southminster Presbyterian’s annual living nativity production, “Journey to Bethlehem,” runs Friday and Saturday at the Prairie Village church located at 63rd Street and Roe Avenue.Each year, approximately 700 attendees go through the production, which features 100 costumed actors portraying roles from the Christmas story. Attendees are guided through the halls of the church, which have been transformed into scenes from Jerusalem and Bethlehem. This is the 28th year Southminster has put on the production.Performances run Friday, Dec. 6, from 6 to 9 p.m., and Saturday, Dec. 7, from 5 to 8 p.m. The event is free and open to the public.Herrod in his court.Mary and Joseph with the newborn baby Jesus.last_img read more

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Survey of Mission residents shows high satisfaction with city; areas for emphasis clear

first_imgMission residents were highly satisfied with the city and city services but had clear areas of emphasis for the next two years, including redevelopment efforts and maintenance of streets.The latest survey of Mission residents shows a high overall satisfaction with city service, a positive perception of the city and an overall feeling of safety that is “off the charts,” according to the firm that performed the survey.Ron Vine of ETC Institute briefed the city council this week on the survey results which gave the high marks, but also pointed to street maintenance and planning to promote redevelopment as the two main areas where residents want more emphasis and there is an opportunity for improvement. Approximately half of all residents surveyed selected those two issues as one of their top three choices when asked what should receive the most emphasis in the next two years. Conversely, those were the two lowest rated issues in a question about the overall satisfaction with city services by category.Findings in an earlier survey regarding the parks was reinforced when residents listed maintenance of city parks, the number of walking and biking trails and the overall appearance of green space as areas that should receive the most emphasis.When the city’s ratings were compared to other cities in the Kansas City metro that have surveyed citizens Mission compared well, falling above the mean in satisfaction on most of the categories. Especially high were the overall feeling of safety and the overall quality of life and services in the city. In perceptions of the community, “you are really high,” Vine told the council.Among the highest ranking responses were to Mission as a place to live, overall quality of police protection and visibility of police in neighborhoods, the quality of the community center and the outdoor aquatics center, snow removal and cleanliness of city streets.More than 75 percent of households thought that greenspace in the city should be maintained or expanded. Residents again listed street maintenance, sidewalks, trails and private property maintenance as items that would have the most impact on improving their neighborhoods.The survey showed that residents favor pedestrian friendly improvements, expanding the trail network and including sidewalks on neighborhood streets. In economic development, residents want to see quality sit-down restaurants, a farmers market (already implemented) and quality exterior design and construction on shopping centers and retail building.City Administrator Laura Smith said the city staff will use the results as a tool to work on improvements going forward.last_img read more

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Working on your tot’s memory now can help his high school success

first_imgShare Share on Facebook Share on Twitter LinkedIn Preschoolers who score lower on a working memory task are likely to score higher on a dropout risk scale at the age of 13, researchers at Université Sainte-Anne and the University of Montreal revealed today.“Dropout risk is calculated from student engagement in school, their grade point average, and whether or not they previously repeated a year in school. Previous research has confirmed that this scale can successfully identify which 12 year olds will fail to complete high school by the age of 21,” explained Caroline Fitzpatrick, who led the study as first author.“These findings underscore the importance of early intervention,” added Linda Pagani, co-senior author. “Parents are able to help their children develop strong working memory skills in the home and this can have a positive impact.”center_img Pinterest Email The study was conducted with 1,824 children whose development has been followed over a number of years through the Quebec Longitudinal Study of Child Development. Their working memory was measured using an imitation sorting task with a trained research assistant. Students indicated their academic performance, prior grade retention, and school engagement – answering questions such as “do you like school?” and “how important is it for you to get good marks?” Children also completed tests of verbal and non-verbal intelligence. Their families were also interviewed to ascertain their socioeconomic status, a factor that the researchers took into account when analyzing their data.Identifying students that are at risk of eventually dropping out of high school is an important step in preventing this social problem. Individual differences in executive functions are likely to play an important role in predicting later drop out risk because they contribute to academic success, engagement, and the achievement of long-term goals. The present results suggest that early individual differences in working memory may contribute to developmental risk for high school dropout.The early detection of working memory problems in children is possible since such children generally show patterns of dysfunction in the classroom and at home. “A child with inadequate working memory might experience difficulty completing tasks in the face of distractors, following sequential instructions, and keeping track of time in order to finish their work in a timely fashion,” Fitzpatrick explained. “Poor self-control more generally is likely to result in disorganized living spaces, such as their room, desk, or locker. Providing parents, teachers, and support staff with basic training on cognitive control and working memory may be advantageous for at-risk children.”Parents can help their children develop strong working memory skills in the home. “Preschoolers can engage in pretend play with other children to help them practice their working memory since this activity involves remembering their own roles and the roles of others. Encouraging mindfulness in children by helping them focus on their moment-to-moment experiences also has a positive effect on cognitive control and working memory,”  Pagani said, noting that breathing exercises and guided meditation can be practiced with preschool and elementary school children.In older children, vigorous aerobic activity such as soccer, basketball, and jumping rope have all been shown to have beneficial effects on concentration and working memory. “Traditional martial arts that place an important focus on respect, self-discipline, and humility have been shown to help children, especially boys build strong cognitive control and working memory skills,” Fitzpatrick added. “Another promising strategy for improving working memory in children is to limit screen time – video games, smartphones, tablets, and television – which can undermine cognitive control and take time away from more enriching pursuits.”The researchers note that generalizing their conclusion to all school children with absolute certainty will require more research.The study was published in the journal Intelligence.last_img read more

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Sixth Brazilian state reports yellow fever

first_imgToday the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), in its weekly yellow fever epidemiologic update, noted that a sixth state, Tocantins, has reported a human case of the mosquito-borne disease.Tocantins joins Para, Rio de Janeiro, Sao Paulo, Espirito Santo, and Minas Gerais as states with confirmed human cases of yellow fever.The patient was described as an unvaccinated young person who worked in the jungle and died in January, the first yellow fever death in that state in 17 years. The current outbreak began when sylvatic yellow fever in Brazil’s jungles leaped to the human population late in 2016.As of Apr 20, there are 2,900 yellow fever cases in Brazil, with 681 cases confirmed and 786 under investigation, PAHO said. There have been 372 deaths, making the case-fatality rate 34% for confirmed cases.Minas Gerais, where the current epidemic began, has reported no new human cases in the past 6 weeks, holding steady at 1,130 suspected cases, PAHO said. Esprito Santo is still experiencing a second wave of new cases, with unvaccinated municipalities most at risk for yellow fever. So far, that state has reported 58 deaths from the disease.PAHO said Aedes aegypti mosquitoes are still not being implicated in the outbreak, but recent epizootic cases in Victoria and Rio de Janeiro hint at a possible change in the transmission cycle. In between last week’s update and this week’s, an additional 296 epizootic cases were reported, bringing the total to 3,245 suspected cases in nonhuman primates since the outbreak began.Epizootic cases represent a risk to nations nearby, according to PAHO. “Reports of epizootics currently  under  investigation  in  states bordering Argentina,  Bolivia, Colombia, Guyana,  Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Uruguay, and  Venezuela represent a  risk  of spread of the virus to the bordering countries, especially in areas with similar ecosystems.”Peru reports 14 cases, 2 deathsPAHO also noted today that Peru has reported 14 yellow fever cases and 2 deaths, the same number of cases reported at this time in 2016. These numbers reflect increases from the years before 2016.The weekly report also contained guidance for member states on vaccination, stating that areas at risk for human transmission should try to obtain a 95% coverage rate. The yellow fever vaccine requires just one dose and is 80% effective 10 days after inoculation, and 99% effective after 1 month.Earlier this week, CIDRAP News reported that Brazil is confident it can produce enough of the yellow fever vaccine to cover the at-risk population.See also:Apr 27 PAHO reportApr 24 CIDRAP News storylast_img read more

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Grosvenor and Westminster Council public realm plans are go

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PSA Inspects Pipelines Manufacture for Knarr Project

first_imgOn 21 and 22 November 2013, the Petroleum Safety Authority Norway conducted an audit of the manufacture of pipelines for the Knarr project.The objective of the audit was to verify that the manufacture of the pipelines for the Knarr project complies with the regulations. A further objective was to verify BG Norge AS’s system for follow-up of suppliers.No non-conformities were identified.An improvement point was identified connected with the approval of governing project documents.[mappress]Press Release, December 12, 2013; Image: ShawCorlast_img read more

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Tanzania’s LNG project could reach USD 30 bln

first_imgTanzania’s LNG export plant could cost up to $30 billion, according to the country’s energy minister.Tanzania is neck and neck in a race with its neighbouring Mozambique to be the first exporter from the Africa’s east. Large LNG players like BG Group, Ophir Energy, Exxon Mobil or Statoil are making progress in taping Tanzania’s gas reserves with huge offshore discoveries recently.Reuters reports the Energy and Minerals Minister, Sospeter Muhongo say at a press conference that the investment in the LNG facility is between $20 billion and $30 billion. He declined to reveal the proposed site for the plant.The minister further said that the preparations are under way for the biggest investment in country’s history, but he did not comment on how the cost of the project would be covered.He did also note that a long-awaited new gas legislation is 75% complete and that it will be in place before major investments are made.[mappress mapid=”15923″]LNG World News Staff; Image: BG Grouplast_img read more

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Think again

first_imgSubscribe now for unlimited access To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAYlast_img read more

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Suspended solicitor convicted over immigration advice

first_imgA woman who continued to provide unregulated immigration advice despite being suspended has avoided jail.Flora Mendes, from Luton, pretended to be a regulated solicitor and practised under the firm name of Arch’s Law – despite the Solicitors Regulation Authority having suspended her in January 2013.Mendes was convicted in her absence at Luton Magistrates’ Court last week of four counts of providing unregulated immigration advice.The 37-year-old was sentenced to six months’ imprisonment for each offence, to run concurrently, suspended for two years. She is also subject to a curfew order to run seven days a week until 29 August and was ordered to pay £2,325 in compensation and £2,881 in prosecution costs.District Judge Lee-Smith said Mendes had ‘left a trail of destruction towards vulnerable people she left in her wake’.Speaking about the sentence, immigration services commissioner Suzanne McCarthy said: ‘Ms Mendes chose to operate outside the law. I am delighted with the outcome of this case.‘I hope it sends a clear message to other people considering providing immigration advice – either act within the law or you will find yourself in court.’According to SRA records, Mendes was subject to an SRA intervention in January 2013 because of suspected dishonesty.The suspension of her practising certificate was lifted in May 2013 on the condition that she could not run a firm again.The SRA then announced last October she would be called to a hearing before the Solicitors Disciplinary Tribunal to face five allegations.last_img read more

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