18 Pennsylvania Workers Evaluated After CO Leak

first_imgNORTHAMPTON, Pa. (AP) – Fire officials say 18 workers were sent to the hospital in eastern Pennsylvania because of a carbon monoxide leak at a grocery store warehouse. Investigators say high levels of the gas were found near where forklift batteries were being charged at the Trader Joe’s warehouse in East Allen Township on Sunday morning. Firefighters discovered the leak while responding to a fire alarm at the warehouse around 7 a.m. Employees were evacuated within about a half hour and were allowed back in around noon. There were no reports of serious injuries. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration is also investigating. Copyright 2012 The Associated Press.last_img read more

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Stand Up to Cancer Club hosts prom for patients

first_imgSaint Mary’s College Stand Up to Cancer Club is encouraging cancer patients, survivors and caregivers to “Don’t Stop Believing.” This Journey-inspired theme will provide the atmosphere for the club’s dance for cancer patients, family and community members tonight at 6 p.m. in Haggar Parlor. Junior Devon Graham, coordinator of the prom, said this night was a way to give patients and loved ones the opportunity to recreate missed experiences. “Unfortunately a lot of cancer patients miss out on really important events like prom, weddings and reunions,” Graham said. Graham said she developed the idea for a prom when volunteering at Memorial Hospital last semester. “They had mentioned that they wanted to do something for the patients, like a dance,” she said. “I had wanted to do a dance for my club anyway, but never really thought about combining the two. Then I thought, ‘Prom.’” She said the evening will feature prom traditions including evening gowns, decorations and the election of a prom king and queen. The club has also hired a DJ to play family-friendly music which will appeal to dancers from age three to 50, Graham said. “We have DJ 3J coming, and we met with him and said we need all kinds of music for all ages,” Graham said. “There will be the dorky Justin Bieber and Miley Cyrus to oldies.” Grahman said local organizations have also helped to make the evening very special. “We’ve had tons of gently used formal gowns donated, so it’s been pretty awesome,” she said. “[And] we’re getting flowers completely donated, so we don’t have to pay for [much, thanks to donations].” While the club volunteers mainly at Memorial Hospital, Graham said cancer patients and survivors from all over the Michiana area are welcome. “We didn’t want to close it down to other people,” she said. “We want everyone to feel welcome to come.” Overall, Graham said the theme of Journey’s song “Don’t Stop Believing” is a perfect way to summarize her hopes for the night. “It’s just a night for everyone to forget what they are going through — their troubles — and just celebrate life and have fun,” she said.last_img read more

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Officers come and officers go…..

first_img And he begins to thank you for your work in your current appointment but tells you that you will be leaving in June for a new appointment and then gives you the name of the city and state that you are being transferred to.  Now, throughout the 26 years of officership for me, I have received that very phone call ten times.I started in Georgia, transferred to Florida, transferred back to Georgia and now I am in Texas.  The thing about the phone call is that you can go anywhere within the 15 states that make up the Southern Territory from Texas to Maryland.While growing up, my parents were also Salvation Army Officers and we not only moved from state to state, but usually in the city they were stationed, my dad always purchased a new parsonage so we would move from one side of town to the other. By Maj. Nancy FullerThere is a saying in The Salvation Army, “officers comes, and officers go….praise God from whom all blessings flow!”That is said because twice a year, January and June, is Farewell time for Salvation Army Officers.  This is how it works.  You pick up the phone on the day that the “calls” are being made and on the other end is the big boss, which ours is in Dallas. So, it’s not what you are doing mostly in that community that you are at but what you are qualified to do in another community that might need your time and talents.  So, the “calls” have been made for June and no, we did not receive one.  I have to admit that I am happy that we are staying yet another year but at the same time, this is our first appointment west of the Mississippi and all of our family is east of the Mississippi, so it makes it a little difficult for this grandma to see her grandchildren very often.But, we have enjoyed the two years that the Army and the Lord has given us here in South Jefferson County and we will continue to enjoy, work hard, build, learn, experience, and enjoy the years ahead that we may have.  Who know what the next “call” will bring or when it will come.  You never know in the Army.  You just salute and go when it does come.Major Nancy Fuller and Maj. John Fuller are the Corps officers in charge of the Port Arthur Branch of the Salvation Army.center_img This brought in five elementary schools I attended, two Junior Highs and one High School, which I was grateful that my parents were stationed in Atlanta and I could get all four years of High School under my belt.After you receive  the “call”, you then have approximately six weeks to pack, tie up loose ends, and say your good-byes and move on to the next assignment.  In The Salvation Army, the parsonage is provided along with the furnishings and everything else, so when we do move, we just take our personal belongings and our clothes.Now, after being married for 25 years and in the Army for 26, our personal belongings fill up a 24 foot moving truck.  It was even more when we were moving with children.  It’s always sad yet exciting when a move takes place.  You have put sometimes years of hard work into your present appointment and hate to say good-bye to those who have worked with you during your tenure.But then you have a whole new area to go to and to establish and to become a part of other people’s lives and communities.  Not all the appointments have been “good” ones for us.  We have spent five years in one appointment to three months in another to a year and a half in another.last_img read more

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Weekend Poll: Which Memorable Coen Brothers Movie Should Hit the Broadway Stage?

first_imgOscar-winning writer/directors Joel and Ethan Coen’s latest film, Inside Llewyn Davis, doesn’t open in theaters until December 20, but the film (which co-stars Kinky Boots headliner Stark Sands) about a young singer who navigates Greenwich Village’s folk music scene in 1961 did help kick off the New York Film Festival on September 27. With Ethan Coen’s first full-length play Women or Nothing wowing off-Broadway, we have the Coen family on the brain. What’s the only thing that comes close to capturing their illustrious films? Broadway, of course! Can you imagine what the Great White Way’s artists could do with the The Big Lebowski’s elaborate bowling fantasy sequence or Fargo’s wood chipper-loving, dopey would-be kidnappers, or O Brother, Where Art Thou?’s Deep South-set tale of the Soggy Bottom Boys? We want to know: Which Coen brothers film should be adapted into a Broadway show? Vote below! View Commentslast_img read more

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Florida GAL program honors Akerman firm

first_imgThe Florida Statewide Guardian ad Litem Program awarded Akerman LLP the 2015 “I Am for the Child Award” at its Second Annual GAL Disabilities Conference in Orlando.The 2015 GAL Disabilities Conference: Imagining the Future, brought together legal professionals who work with abused, abandoned, and neglected children who also have a disability.In making the announcement, Alan Abramowitz, executive director of the Statewide Guardian ad Litem Program, stated: “In Florida we have accomplished so much, yet there are still approximately 4,500 children in foster care who do not have a GAL standing by their side. The generous support from Akerman is helping to change that grim statistic for the better. For that, we are so grateful.”Each year, the GAL Program gives statewide awards to its staff, volunteers, and community supporters.“Many of our circuits nominated the local Akerman offices as their Community Advocate and Community Partner of the Year for all the support they have shown and given the GAL Program,” Abramowitz said. “Akerman lawyers and staff have not only contributed countless volunteer hours and donations to benefit foster youth in Florida and throughout the U.S., but also have taken on cases, advocating for children both in the courtroom and in the community.”He said over the past year, more than 100 Akerman attorneys and staff in Florida alone have become certified guardians ad litem for dependent youth, and every day additional lawyers and professionals from their firm are signing up to become GALs.“Giving back is essential to our firm. It is part of our relationships with clients; it shapes the experiences of our people; and it drives us to be a positive force in our communities,” said Akerman Chair and CEO Andrew Smulian. “We are committed to community partners who address the core needs of children and advocate for those without a voice. We are deeply humbled by this recognition of our work and are grateful to the Florida Statewide Guardian ad Litem Program for their continued collaboration on such an important and worthwhile cause.”For more information about the GAL Program, visit www.GuardianadLitem.org. July 15, 2015 Regular News Florida GAL program honors Akerman firmcenter_img Florida GAL program honors Akerman firmlast_img read more

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Why It Feels So Terrible to Drop Your Kid at College

first_imgFor an adult who is no longer young but not yet old, there is perhaps no better preparation for death than sending a child to college.That’s not because it’s a reminder of the ceaseless march of age, though it is. It’s not because it unleashes a stampede of wild memories, though it does. And it’s not because it’s a moment that marks multiple beginnings and endings, although those fires do ignite and extinguish.It’s because adulthood distances you from the experience of dreading things that are certain to come about eventually. It’s not that you dread more things, or graver things, when you’re a kid—time seems to lurch slowly, death seems long off, bills don’t stack up, and all the rest. But for young people, dread for small things feels constant. They aren’t in as much direct control of their lives as adults are, and many things feel like they happen to them. By adulthood, that relationship with dread wanes (even if others, like the shadow of certain death, wax). Sending your child away to school offers a taste of that particular flavor of fate—as well as an inspiration to manage it more deliberately. Read the whole story: The Atlantic More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more

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Kiwanis Hosts Breakfast With Santa Saturday Dec. 7

first_imgKiwanians and Key Clubbers preparing food for Breakfast with Santa. Courtesy photoKIWANIS News:The annual Breakfast with Santa, sponsored by the Kiwanis Club of Los Alamos and Del Norte Credit Union, 7-11 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 7 at the Betty Ehart Senior Center. The Los Alamos Flute Choir is schduled at 9 a.m. to perform a special program of Christmas Carols. Also, Santa Claus is scheduled to attend the breakfast and children can have their picture taken with him.The breakfast is free. In return, attendees are requested to donate either non-perishable food items or money.Food collected will be used by LA Cares to feed local families in need. Money donated will be used for the Kiwanis/CYFD Foster Children Christmas Party. Any money left over from the Foster Children’s Party will be used to purchase supplies for foster children.last_img read more

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NIST Pioneering Research On Disinfection Of Drinking Water

first_imgA scientist places a water sample onto a custom-made platform. Each water sample contains microorganisms such as the parasite Giardia and adenoviruses, that can make humans sick. Courtesy/T. Larason/NIST Courtesy/KOBU Agency/UnsplashNIST News:While awaiting full access to their labs due to COVID-19 restrictions, scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have taken this rare opportunity to report the technical details of pioneering research they conducted on the disinfection of drinking water using ultraviolet (UV) light.Back in 2012, the NIST scientists and their collaborators published several papers on some fundamental findings with potential benefits to water utility companies. But these articles never fully explained the irradiation setup that made the work possible. Now, for the first time, NIST researchers are publishing the technical details of the unique experiment, which relied on a portable laser to test how well different wavelengths of UV light inactivated different microorganisms in water. The work appears today in the Review of Scientific Instruments (RSI).“We’ve been wanting to formally write this up for years,” NIST’s Tom Larason said. “Now we have time to tell the world about it.”One urgency for publishing a full description of the NIST system is that researchers envision using this UV setup for new experiments that go beyond the study of drinking water and into disinfection of solid surfaces and air. The potential applications could include better UV disinfection of hospital rooms and even studies of how sunlight inactivates the coronavirus responsible for COVID-19. “As far as I know, no one has duplicated this work, at least not for biological research,” Larason said. “That’s why we want to get this paper out now.”Good enough to drinkUltraviolet light has wavelengths that are too short for the human eye to see. UV ranges from about 100 nanometers (nm) to 400 nm, whereas humans can see a rainbow of color from violet (about 400 nm) to red (about 750 nm).One way to disinfect drinking water is to irradiate it with UV light, which breaks down harmful microorganisms’ DNA and related molecules. At the time of the original study, most water irradiation systems used a UV lamp that emitted most of its UV light at a single wavelength, 254 nm. For years, though, water utility companies had shown increasing interest in a different type of disinfection lamp that was “polychromatic,” meaning it emitted UV light at multiple different wavelengths. But the effectiveness of the new lamps was not well defined, said Karl Linden, a University of Colorado Boulder (CU Boulder) environmental engineer who was a principal investigator on the 2012 study. “We discovered in the mid-2000s that polychromatic UV sources were more effective for virus inactivation — specifically because these lamps produced UV light at low wavelengths, under 230 nm,” Linden said. “But it was hard to quantify how much more effective and what the mechanisms of that effectiveness were.”In 2012, a group of microbiologists and environmental engineers led by CU Boulder was interested in adding to the knowledge base that water utility companies had regarding UV disinfection. With funding from the Water Research Foundation, a nonprofit organization, the scientists were looking to methodically test how sensitive various germs were to different wavelengths of UV light.Normally, the light source for these experiments would have been a lamp that generates a wide range of UV wavelengths. To narrow the band of frequencies as much as possible, the researchers’ plan was to shine the light through filters. But that still would have produced relatively wide, 10-nm bands of light, and unwanted frequencies would have bled through the filter, making it difficult to determine exactly which wavelengths were inactivating each microorganism. The microbiologists and engineers wanted a cleaner, more controllable source for the UV light. So, they called on NIST to help.NIST developed, built and operated a system to deliver a well-controlled UV beam onto each sample of microorganisms being tested. The setup involved putting the sample in question — a petri dish filled with water with a certain concentration of one of the specimens — into a light-tight enclosure. What makes this experiment unique is that NIST designed the UV beam to be delivered by a tunable laser. “Tunable” means it can produce a beam of light with an extremely narrow bandwidth — less than a single nanometer — over a wide range of wavelengths, in this case from 210 nm to 300 nm. The laser was also portable, allowing scientists to bring it to the lab where the work was being conducted. Researchers also used a NIST-calibrated UV detector to measure the light hitting the petri dish before and after each measurement, to make sure they really knew how much light was hitting each sample.There were a lot of challenges to get the system to work. Researchers ferried the UV light to the petri dish with a series of mirrors. However, different UV wavelengths require different reflective materials, so NIST researchers had to design a system that used mirrors with various reflective coatings that they could swap out between test runs. They also had to procure a light diffuser to take the laser beam — which has a higher intensity in the center — and spread it out so that it was uniform across the entire water sample.The end result was a series of graphs that showed how different germs responded to UV light of different wavelengths — the first data for some of the microbes — with greater precision than ever measured before. And the team found some unexpected results. For example, the viruses exhibited increased sensitivity as wavelengths decreased below 240 nm. But for other pathogens such as Giardia, UV sensitivity was about the same even as the wavelengths got lower. “The results from this study have been used quite frequently by water utility companies, regulatory agencies and others in the UV field working directly on water — and also air — disinfection,” said CU Boulder environmental engineer Sara Beck, first author on three papers produced from this 2012 work. “Understanding which wavelengths of light inactivate different pathogens can make disinfection practices more precise and efficient,” she said.I, UV RobotThe same system that NIST designed for delivering a controlled, narrow band of UV light to water samples can also be used for future experiments with other potential applications. For example, researchers hope to explore how well UV light kills germs on solid surfaces such as those found in hospital rooms, and even germs suspended in the air. In an effort to reduce hospital-acquired infections, some medical centers have been blasting rooms with a sterilizing beam of UV radiation carried in by robots.But there are no real standards yet for use of these robots, the researchers said, so although they can be effective, it’s hard to know how effective, or to compare the strengths of different models. “For devices that irradiate surfaces, there are a lot of variables. How do you know they’re working?” Larason said. A system like NIST’s could be useful for developing a standard way to test different models of disinfection bots. Another potential project could examine the effect of sunlight on the novel coronavirus, both in the air and on surfaces, Larason said. And the original collaborators said they hope to use the laser system for future projects related to water disinfection. “The sensitivity of microorganisms and viruses to different UV wavelengths is still very much relevant for current water and air disinfection practices,” Beck said, “especially given the development of new technologies as well as new disinfection challenges, such as those associated with COVID-19 and hospital-acquired infections, for example.”last_img read more

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New air separation plant for BOC Gases USA

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

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BOEM to revamp offshore energy regulations rulebook

first_imgThe U.S. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) has issued an Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPR) on Risk Management, Financial Assurance, and Loss Prevention to seek public input as it considers modernizing its risk management program and bonding regulations for offshore oil and gas operations on the Outer Continental Shelf.BOEM acting Director Walter D. Cruickshank.This first step initiates a dialogue about BOEM’s existing regulations, which are approximately 20 years old and have not kept pace with offshore infrastructure developments, including deepwater operations, current industry practices, and the growing costs of decommissioning.“We would like to work with industry and others to determine how to improve our regulatory regime to better align with the realities of aging offshore infrastructure, hazard risks, and increasing costs of decommissioning,” said BOEM acting Director Walter D. Cruickshank. “Today’s action is an important first step in initiating a dialogue on how to best enhance our risk management program to better match current practices, with the ultimate goal of ensuring that industry meets its decommissioning responsibilities and the burden of decommissioning a facility on the Outer Continental Shelf does not fall to taxpayers.”Existing regulations require lessees on the Outer Continental Shelf to provide bonds or other alternative forms of financial assurance to cover current and future operations, such as decommissioning oil and gas infrastructure. Since the current bonding requirements were set nearly a quarter of a century ago, offshore operations have changed significantly, such as increased advancements in the scale and complexity of deepwater and subsea operations, and the costs of decommissioning have dramatically increased. In light of the infrastructure and operational changes, BOEM has recognized the need to update its requirements and develop a comprehensive program to assist in identifying, prioritizing, and managing the risks associated with industry activities on the Outer Continental Shelf.BOEM is seeking stakeholder comments regarding various risk management and monitoring activities related to offshore energy development on the Outer Continental Shelf. The advanced notice of proposed rulemaking seeks comment on the bonding and financial assurance program for BOEM’s offshore oil and gas program.The bureau is also accepting comments on the analogous bonding and financial assurance program for BOEM’s offshore renewable energy and hard minerals programs. The notice also solicits comments on best practices to mitigate risks, as well as whether, or to what extent, the current forms of financial assurance are adequate and appropriate. [mappress]Press Release, August 18, 2014last_img read more

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