Fires tear through East Java park, threatening leopard habitat

first_imgAuthorities in East Java, Indonesia, are trying to stop a wildfire from spreading into core zone of the Coban Wisula forest, home to Javan leopards.The fire is burning within Bromo Tengger Semeru National Park, a major tourist attraction. An iconic landscape in the park, known as Teletubbies Hill, has already gone up in flames.A local NGO is monitoring the situation to make sure none of the leopards are flushed out of their habitat and into contact with humans, which could turn violent. MALANG, Indonesia — Wildfires are sweeping across a savanna and protected rainforest in Bromo Tengger Semeru National Park in Java, home to one of the world’s rarest leopard subspecies and other threatened wildlife.Thirty hectares (74 acres) have burned since Sept. 1. Most of the burned land is savanna, while the rest is cypress and acacia forest.“Initially, we observed eight [fire] hotspots,” said Jhon Kennedie, the head of the park management. “Then it increased to 274.”Authorities are doing what they can to control the blaze. Patrol cars were being used to transport water to the site, before a fire truck arrived on site.Firefighters are trying to prevent the blaze from spreading into the heart of the Coban Trisula rainforest, home to the Javan leopard (Panthera pardus melas), a critically endangered species, as well as the endangered Javan hawk-eagle (Nisaetus bartelsi), the national bird of Indonesia.“Leopards and eagles breed in there,” Jhon said of Coban Trisula. “We’ve seen them on camera traps.”A Javan leopard. Image by Cloudtail the Snow Leopard/Flickr.Jhon said he suspected the fires stemmed from a campfire set by local people. The location where it started is typically frequented by locals to collect firewood, look for medicinal plants and hunt birds. “The location is not a tourist attraction, the perpetrators are not tourists,” Jhon said.He said the perpetrators may have come at night and made a fire to stay warm. The fire then likely spread out of control and into the nearby savanna.The park authority has issued a directive warning residents not to start campfires. There are a number of signs to this effect as well.Starting a campfire in the national park is a crime, Jhon said, and the perpetrators face jail time. The park authority is collaborating with the district police to hunt down the perpetrators. “So that it doesn’t happen again,” Jhon said.The fires have even extended to the so-called Teletubbies Hill, an iconic spot in the national park that resembles the setting of the popular children’s TV show. The hilly area typically stays green throughout the year.A wall of fire in the park savanna this week. Image courtesy of the park authority.Rosek Nursahid, the head of protection at Forest & Fauna (ProFauna), an NGO, said he was concerned about the ecological impact of the fires. Rising temperatures and smoke would affect wildlife. The area is also home to Javan langurs (Trachypithecus auratus), a type of Old World monkey, and a deer species known as the red muntjac (Muntiacus muntjak). Bird migratory routes will also be disturbed, he said.The Javan leopard, Rosek said, is very sensitive. If the fire is not resolved immediately, the animal might be forced out of its forest habitat and into contact with humans. This hasn’t happened yet, he said. Moreover, their habitat is already narrowing because of the tourism development.“So far there haven’t been any serious incidents,” Rosek said. “We’re keeping an eye on the situation.”Authorities are struggling to extinguish the fires on steep terrain.“The fire is spreading, it’s hard to put out,” said Yhogi Hadi Setiawan, deputy chief of the local police. “The wind is strong.”Mount Bromo, the centerpiece of the national park, is still open to visitors; only one of the four gateways to the mountain is closed.This story was reported by Mongabay’s Indonesia team and was first published on our Indonesian site on Sept. 4, 2018.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by mongabayauthorcenter_img Animals, Biodiversity, Disasters, Endangered, Environment, Environmental Crime, Fires, Forest Fires, Forestry, Forests, Law Enforcement, Leopards, Mammals, Mountains, National Parks, Protected Areas, Rainforests, Savannas, Threats To Rainforests, Tropical Forests, Wildlife last_img read more

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Santa Clarita encourages public art

first_imgSANTA CLARITA – Three sail sculptures mounted in a small man-made lake are planned at the new Bridgeport Marketplace, an example of the city’s efforts to have developers include public art in their projects. Other plans to spice up the view along city streets include uniquely designed bus shelters and images of Santa Clarita decking a new mall parking structure. “The goal is to make any new development more attractive by encouraging public art,” said Phil Lantis, Santa Clarita’s arts and events administrator. “It gives things a little life.” At the Bridgeport shopping center under construction on Newhall Ranch Road and McBean Parkway, the developer proposes three white 20-foot-tall sailboats anchored in a decorative lake visible from the street, Lantis said. The proposal is preliminary and has yet to be reviewed by the city Planning Commission and City Council, but it was suggested to satisfy Santa Clarita’s effort to add some art to the landscape. “It’s just a concept at this point, but on paper it looks pretty good,” Lantis said. The plans will be reviewed at tonight’s 6:30 meeting of the city Arts Advisory Committee. The group will meet in the Orchard Conference Room in City Hall. Its recommendation will be relayed to the city Planning Commission. The advisory committee also will hear a report on seven proposals from companies and individuals who answered a city request for creative designs for bus shelters. Most would be crafted of metal. The designs are undergoing structural studies to determine if they would be safe, Lantis said. “Each shelter would be unique; they’re really quite different from each other,” he said. At the Westfield Valencia Town Center, where approval for a massive expansion was granted last week, one condition requires the mall owner, working with city government, to use images from local artists focusing on Santa Clarita Valley history, events and communities to decorate the new parking structure. The mall already has bronze sculptures of families shopping, a man reading a newspaper and children at play at a fountain. pat.aidem@dailynews.com (661) 257-5251 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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AIDS drugs may help prevent getting virus

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORE‘Mame,’ ‘Hello, Dolly!’ composer Jerry Herman dies at 88160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! ATLANTA – Twenty-five years after the first AIDS cases jolted the world, scientists think they soon may have a pill that people could take to keep from getting the virus that causes the global killer. Two drugs already used to treat HIV infection have shown such promise at preventing it in monkeys that officials last week said they would expand early tests in healthy high-risk men and women around the world. “This is the first thing I’ve seen at this point that I think really could have a prevention impact,” said Thomas Folks, a federal scientist since the earliest days of AIDS. Condoms and counseling alone have not been enough – HIV spreads to 10 people every minute, 5 million every year. A vaccine remains the best hope but none is in sight. If larger tests show the drugs work, they could be given to people at highest risk of HIV – from gay men in American cities to women in Africa who catch the virus from their partners. Some fear that this could make things worse. “I’ve had people make comments to me, ‘Aren’t you just making the world safer for unsafe sex?”‘ said Dr. Lynn Paxton, team leader for the project at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The drugs would only be given to people along with counseling and condoms, and regular testing to make sure they haven’t become infected. Health officials also think the strategy has potential for more people than just gay men, though they don’t intend to give it “to housewives in Peoria,” as Paxton puts it. Some uninfected gay men already are getting the drugs from friends with AIDS or doctors willing to prescribe them to patients who admit not using condoms. This kind of use could lead to drug resistance and is one reason officials are rushing to expand studies. “We need information about whether this approach is safe and effective” before recommending it, said Dr. Susan Buchbinder, who leads one study in San Francisco. The drugs are tenofovir (Viread) and emtricitabine, or FTC (Emtriva), sold in combination as Truvada by Gilead Sciences Inc., a California company best known for inventing Tamiflu, a drug showing promise against bird flu. Unlike vaccines, which work through the immune system – the very thing HIV destroys – AIDS drugs keep the virus from reproducing. They already are used to prevent infection in health care workers accidentally exposed to HIV, and in babies whose pregnant mothers receive them. Taking them daily or weekly before exposure to the virus might keep it from taking hold, just as taking malaria drugs in advance can prevent that disease when someone is bitten by an infected mosquito, scientists believe. Monkeys suggest they are right. Specifically, six macaques were given the drugs and then challenged with a deadly combination of monkey and human AIDS viruses, administered in rectal doses to imitate how the germ spreads in gay men. Despite 14 weekly blasts of the virus, none of the monkeys became infected. All but one of another group of monkeys that didn’t get the drugs did, typically after two exposures. What happened next, when scientists quit giving the drugs, was equally exciting. “We wanted to see, was the drug holding the virus down so we didn’t detect it,” or was it truly preventing infection, said Folks, head of the CDC’s HIV research lab. “We’re now four months following the animals with no drug, no virus. They’re uninfected and healthy.”last_img read more

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Antelope Valley Calendar

first_imgWEDNESDAY Emotional Freedom Technique for pain relief weekly demonstrations, 6:30-7:30 p.m. (except before three-day weekends), Stress Management Institute for Living Empowered, 44130 Division St., Lancaster. Call (661) 942-4220. Sweet Talkers Toastmasters will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. at Wilsona School District boardroom, 18050 E. Ave. 0, Lake Los Angeles. Call (661) 944-1216 or 944-1130. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3000 will serve specialty meals, or hamburger baskets, 5:30-8 p.m. at the post, 4342 W. Ave. L, Quartz Hill. Proceeds will benefit community affairs. Members, guests and public welcome. Call (661) 943-2225. Eye Opener Toastmasters Club will meet, 7-8:30 a.m. at Denny’s Restaurant, 2005 W. Ave. K, Lancaster. Call Al Moore at (661) 726-3627. Talents Unlimited Toastmasters will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. at Kaiser Permanente. Call Alan Strech at (661) 940-4640. Scrapbookers Club will meet, 5-7 p.m. at Peldyns, 27021 Twenty Mule Team Road, Boron. Free tools for use. Bring book and photos. Call (760) 608-1422. Antelope Valley Intertribal Council meeting, 7 p.m. the first Wednesday of each month at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 435-0423. AIDS-related death support group meets, 5:30 p.m. the first and third Wednesdays of each month at 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Sudden-death support group meets, 5:30 p.m. the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month at 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Dual Recovery Anonymous, an informal 12-step group for mental health consumers with a history of substance abuse, will meet, 3 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite G. Call (661) 947-1595. Antelope Valley Interfaith Choir will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. For adults and mature teenagers. Call Kathe Walters at (661) 285-8306. Hi-Desert Woodworkers Club meets, 6:30 p.m. the first Wednesday of each month at Don’s Restaurant, Victorville. Call (760) 240-4705. Schizophrenics Anonymous will meet, 2 p.m. at the Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite G, Palmdale. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. Desert Noon Lions Club meets, noon-1 p.m. the first and third Wednesdays of each month at the California Pantry, 120 E. Palmdale Blvd., Palmdale. Call Barbara at (661) 947-4079. Successful Marriage and Parenting course, 7-9 p.m. in Lancaster. Free. For information and location, call (661) 538-1846. Emotions Anonymous will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. in the multipurpose meeting room on the second floor at Antelope Valley Hospital, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. The organization is a 12-step, self-help group. Call (661) 943-5466. Little Angels, a support group for families with young children with Down syndrome, meets, 6:30 p.m. the third Wednesday of each month at the North Los Angeles County Regional Center, 43210 Gingham Ave., Lancaster. Call Cyndee Moore at (661) 945-6761 or e-mail cyndeem@nlacrc.com. Al-Anon discussion group will meet, 7 p.m. at 39055 10th St. W., Palmdale; Alateen at 7 p.m. at 39055 10th St. W., Palmdale, and a women’s discussion group at 7:30 p.m. at 32142 Crown Valley Road, Acton. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. A Course in Miracles discussion, 7-9 p.m. Call (661) 723-9967. Palmdale Moose Lodge, 3101 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale, will host bingo games beginning at 10 a.m. Call (661) 947-6777. Bridge Club for seniors will meet, noon-3 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Beginner and intermediate players welcome. Call (661) 267-5551. Blood pressure testing for seniors, 10-11:15 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Billiard Gang for seniors, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Flex and stretch, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat and hand weights. Call (661) 267-5551. Knitting and crocheting for seniors, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 704 E. Palmdale Blvd., Palmdale. Bring your own supplies. Call (661) 267-5551. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Palmdale Children’s Youth Library, 38510 Sierra Highway. Call Kathy at (661) 265-1839. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 6:30-7:30 p.m. in Multipurpose Room 2 at Antelope Valley Hospital, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 256-7064. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Women’s Eating Disorder Group will meet, 6-7:30 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 1529 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite 203, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700. Bingo for seniors, 12:15-2:15 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Cost: 25 cents per card. Call (661) 267-5551. Talents Unlimited Toastmasters will meet, 7 p.m. at Kaiser Permanente Mental Health Center, 44444 20th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 949-7423. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.todayna.org. THURSDAY Ask and It is Given classes, 6:30-8 p.m., Stress Management Institute for Living Empowered, 44130 Division St., Lancaster. Call (661) 942-4220. High Desert Toastmasters will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. at 1008 W. Ave. M-4, Palmdale. Call (661) 992-3229 or 944-1130. High Desert Modular Model Railroad Club meets, 7 p.m. the second Thursday of each month in the Experimental Test Pilots Association boardroom, 44814 Elm Ave., Lancaster. Call Bob Drury at (661) 400-4479. Cedar Open Reading meets weekly, 7-9 p.m. in Cedar Hall, 44851 Cedar Ave., Lancaster, except on the second Thursday of the month when the meeting is in the gallery, 44857 Cedar Ave., Lancaster. Call (661) 943-4314. The Overcomers, an emotional and educational support group for mental health consumers, will meet, 6:30 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite G. Call Bill Slocum or Mary Rogers at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. Aces & Deuces Square Dance Club will meet, 7-8:15 p.m. for beginners and 8:15-9:30 p.m. for plus at Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale, for ages 10 and up. Cost: $3. Call (661) 256-7650. Grief/Bereavement Group will meet, 10 a.m. at ProCare Hospice, 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. The Ups and Downs, a support group for people with bipolar disorder or depression, will meet, 2 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite G, Palmdale. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. Facilitated Anger Management Group for teens will meet, 4:30-6 p.m., and adults will meet, 6:30-8 p.m., at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or (800) 479-CARE or visit the Web site: www.frf.av.org. Al-Anon will host a discussion, 1 p.m. at 1737 E. Ave. R, Palmdale; a step study at 7 p.m. at 1827 E. Ave. Q-10, Palmdale; and a meeting on Steps, Traditions, Concepts at 7:30 p.m. at 44815 Fig Ave., Suite 101, Lancaster. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Emotions Anonymous will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. Information and location: (661) 723-9967. Desert Aire Women’s Golf Association will meet at Desert Aire Golf Course at Avenue P and 40th Street East in Palmdale. Call (661) 269-5982. Cardio Knockout Blast, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat. Call (661) 267-5551. Billiard Gang for seniors, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Sierra Club will offer one- to two-hour conditioning hikes leaving at 6 p.m. from the Palmdale Park and Ride lot, Avenue S at Antelope Valley Freeway. Moderately conditioned beginning hikers are welcome. Call (661) 273-2761. Country line dance lessons for seniors, 1-2 p.m. for beginners and 2:15 p.m. for intermediate dancers at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Donation requested. Call (661) 267-5551. Soroptimist International of Antelope Valley will meet, noon at the Holiday Inn of Palmdale-Lancaster, 38630 5th St. W., Palmdale. Business and professional women are invited. Call (661) 946-1609. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 5:30 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38530 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-4178. Take Off Pounds Sensibly, Chapter 569 will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Grecian Isles Mobile Home Park, 4444 E. Ave. R, Palmdale. Call (661) 947-7672 or (661) 285-5003. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 7:30-9 p.m. Step Workbook reading and writing. Call (661) 947-7935. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Support group for women in abusive or battering situations will meet, 1-3:30 p.m. and 6-8 p.m. A Spanish-language group also will meet, 10 a.m.-noon. Call (661) 945-6736 or (661) 945-5509. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org. FRIDAY Fun After 40 Ballroom Dance Club will host ballroom dancing, 7:30-10 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12. Dance lessons: 6:30-7:30 p.m. Dance admission: $3 for club members, $4 for nonmembers. Call (661) 943-0210 or 267-5551. Swingtime will host swing, waltz, ballroom and salsa dancing, 7-10 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. Cost: $3. Call (661) 400-3166. Recovery Inc., a self-help group for people with anxieties, panic attacks, depression and fears, will meet, 2 p.m. at Los Angeles County Mental Health offices, 349A E. Ave. K-6, Lancaster. Call (661) 943-3956. Grief Support Group will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. at Lancaster Presbyterian Church, 1661 W. Lancaster Blvd., Lancaster. Call (661) 951-2988. Speakers in the Wind Toastmasters will meet, noon-1 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call Jack Knight at (661) 946-7166. Adult Anger Management Group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. Court approved. Call (661) 266-8700. Low-cost Facilitated Parenting Group will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. Court approved. Call (661) 266-8700. Successful Marriage and Parenting course, 10 a.m.-noon. Call Carmen Andersen at (661) 273-8122. MOPS (Mothers of Preschoolers) meets, 9:15 a.m.-noon the first and third Fridays of each month at Church of Christ, 1655 E. Lancaster Blvd., Lancaster. Includes a hot breakfast buffet, discussion groups, featured speaker, craft and demonstrations. Children welcome. Cost: $5 for moms and $3 for kids. Call (661) 943-3162 or (661) 942-1638. Stress Management will meet, 1 p.m. at 43423 Division St., Suite 107, Lancaster. Call (661) 947-1595 or (661) 726-2850, Ext. 221. Speakers in the Wind Toastmaster Club 2867 will meet, noon-1 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call Joyce Hall at (661) 946-1181 or Barbara Linde at (661) 947-2537. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Celebrate Recovery, a biblically based 12-step recovery program, will meet, 7 p.m. at First Baptist Church, 44648 15th St. W. Call Pastor Pat Tanner at (661) 948-0855. The Lightkeepers, Spiritual Discussion Group, will meet, 7:30 p.m. at Center of Light, A.V. Church, 1030 West Ave. L-8, Lancaster. Call (661) 718-8731. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3000 and Ladies Auxiliary will serve steak or shrimp dinners, 5:30-8 p.m. at 4342 W. Ave. L, Quartz Hill. Takeout orders. Proceeds will go to community affairs. Members, guests and public welcome. Call (661) 943-2225. Meditation class, 7-8:30 p.m. For location and information, call (661) 945-9832. Schizophrenics Anonymous will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. in the multipurpose room on the mental health ward at Antelope Valley Hospital, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. The Ups and Downs, a support group for people who have been diagnosed with bipolar disorder or depression, will meet, 2 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Friendship Center, 43423 Division St. Suite 107, Lancaster. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. The Kaiser Permanente Grief Support Group will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. at the clinic offices, 44444 20th St. W., Lancaster. Open to the community. Free. Call (661) 951-2988. The Weekenders, a social and recreational group for mental health consumers, will meet, 1-2 p.m. at Antelope Valley Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Palmdale. Call (661) 947-1595. Al-Anon will have a 12-and-12 meeting at 10:30 a.m. at 1821 W. Lancaster Blvd. and a beginners meeting at 7 p.m. at 1737 E. Ave. R, Room 104, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Pinochle Group for seniors, 6-9 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Flex and stretch, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring floor mat and hand weights. Call (661) 267-5551. Billiard Gang for seniors, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Oil painting class for seniors, 9-11 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Shop Talk Toastmasters will meet, 7-8:30 a.m. at Crazy Otto’s Diner. Call Stan Main at (661) 269-1424. Take Off Pounds Sensibly, Chapter 1681 will meet, 9:30-11 a.m. in Room 14 at Lancaster United Methodist Church, 918 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 943-4459. Rosamond Moose Lodge, 1105 Sierra Highway, Rosamond, will serve dinner, 5-8 p.m. Cost: $4-$6. Bingo will start at 10 a.m., offered by the Knights of Columbus, 719 W. Ave. M, Lancaster. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 6:30-7:30 p.m. at Lancaster United Methodist Church, 918 W. Ave. J, Room 13, Lancaster. Call (661) 943-0595. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org. SATURDAY Leona Valley Sertoma Club meets, 8 a.m. the first and third Saturdays of each month at Jackie’s Restaurant, 40352 90th St. W., Leona Valley. Call (661) 270-0339. Low-cost Facilitated Parenting Group will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. Court approved. Call (661) 266-8700. Seniors Lunch-Bingo Hour, noon-5 p.m. the fourth Saturday of each month at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. Sponsored by Buklod ng Pagkakaisa (Bond of Unity). Call Emerita Ross at (661) 723-7876 or Marie Cabrera at (661) 726-5309. Al-Anon will have a Spanish-speaking discussion meeting, 9 a.m. at 38345 30th St. E., Suite C-3, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-9353. Facilitated Anger Management Group for ages 8-11 will meet, 2:30-4 p.m.; teens, 4:30-6 p.m., and adults, 10:30-noon or 12:30-2 p.m. at the Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or (800) 479-CARE or visit the Web site: www.frf.av.org. Beginning yoga, 9-10 a.m. at Unity Church of Antelope Valley, 39149 8th St. E., Palmdale. Call (661) 273-3341. Women and Self-esteem support group meets in the Acton area. Call (661) 947-0839. Healing Heart support group will meet, 4-5:30 p.m. at the Salvation Army store, 45001 Beech Ave. in Lancaster. Call (661) 943-5830. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 9 a.m. at St. Stephen’s Lutheran Church, 1737 E. Ave. R, Palmdale. Call Jane at (661) 945-4798. Women Midlife Transition Support Group for women over age 40 is facilitated by a professional psychotherapist. Call (661) 947-0839. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. in Room 13 at Lancaster United Methodist Church, 918 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 724-1820. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.todayna.org or www.sava-na.org. SUNDAY J&J Social and Travel Club hosts a buffet brunch, 1 p.m. at the Boulders mobile home park clubhouse, 40701 Rancho Vista Blvd., Palmdale. Make reservations by noon Saturday at (661) 267-2586. Nicotine Anonymous will meet, 8-9 p.m. at Seventh-day Adventist Church, 43824 30th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 946-7606. Buklod ng Pagkakaisa (Bond of Unity) Seniors’ Social Hour, 4-7 p.m. the first Sunday of each month at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. Meetings feature films, talks, singalongs, talent shows and dancing. Call (661) 723-7876 or (661) 726-5309. Costume Figure Sessions, 2:30-5:30 p.m. the fourth Sunday of each month at Cedar Centre Hall, 44857 Cedar Ave. Cost: $5; students with identification are admitted free. 40 and Up Singles dance, 6:30-10:30 p.m. every Sunday at Lancaster Elks Lodge, 240 E. Ave. K, Lancaster. Admission: $5 members, $7 nonmembers. Call (661) 317-7021. Life Figure Sessions, 2:30-5:30 p.m. the second Sunday of each month at Cedar Centre Hall, 44857 Cedar Ave. Cost: $5; students with ID are admitted free. Teen Care and Support Group, for teens who have lost a family member or friend, will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Desert Vineyard Christian School, 1011 E. Ave. I, Room 302, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-2777. Palmdale Moose Lodge, 3101 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale, will host bingo games beginning at 1 p.m. Call (661) 947-6777. Revealing Truth, a meditation and spiritual discussion, 4:45-6:15 p.m. Call (661) 723-9967. Antelope Valley Chess Club will meet, 1-5 p.m. at American Legion Post 771, 39463 10th St. E., Palmdale. Call (661) 726-1323. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 5-6 p.m. at 44960 Cedar Ave., Lancaster. Call (661) 789-5806. MONDAY Beyond the Light, a socialization and support group for young adults, ages 17 1/2 to 25, with mental health issues, will meet, noon-1 p.m. at Transitional Youth Services, 104 E. Ave. K-4, Lancaster. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595. Jazzercise classes, 5:30-6:30 p.m. at George Lane Park, 5520 W. Ave. L-8, Quartz Hill. Call (661) 722-7780. Dance Groove will give ballroom and Latin dance lessons, 6-8:30 p.m. Dance Groove Studio, 43631 10th St. W., Lancaster. Cost: $5 per person. Call (661) 948-9101. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Co-Dependents Anonymous Step Study will meet, 6-7 p.m. at Antelope Valley Hospital, multipurpose meeting room, second floor, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 944-4927. 12 Step Recovery Groups for alcohol and drug addiction, co-dependency, relationship addiction, overeating, fear and anxiety issues, meets, 7 p.m. at Desert Vineyard Christian Fellowship, 1011 E. Ave. I, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-2777. The Palmdale Elks Lodge, 2705 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale will host bingo, 5:30 p.m. The grill will be open. Call (661) 947-2027. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 6-7 p.m. at Lancaster United Methodist Church, 918 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 722-0393. Co-Dependents Anonymous will host a 12-step recovery program, 7:30-9 p.m., at Antelope Valley Hospital, multipurpose meeting room, second floor, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 944-4927 or (661) 946-5846. Grief Recovery Outreach Group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or visit www.frf.av.org. Adult Anger Management Group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700. The Highs and Lows, a support group for those diagnosed with manic depression or related disorders, will meet, 7-9 p.m. at Lutheran Church of the Master, 725 E. Ave. J, Lancaster. Al-Anon will have a discussion, 7 p.m. at 51st Street West and Avenue K, Lancaster. Child care provided. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Take Off Pounds Sensibly Chapter 572 will meet, 9-11 a.m. at the Mayflower Gardens chapel, 6570 W. Ave. L-12, Quartz Hill. Call (661) 943-3089. Early bird bingo games will begin at 6 p.m. with regular games beginning at 6:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Elks Lodge, 2705 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale. Call (661) 947-2027. Early bird bingo games will begin at 6:30 p.m. with regular games beginning at 7 p.m. at Paraclete High School, 42145 30th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 943-3255, Monday evenings: (661) 943-1017. Billiard Gang for seniors will meet, 9:15 a.m.-4 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Flex and stretch, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat and hand weights. Call (661) 267-5551. Parent support group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 1529 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite 203, Palmdale. The facilitated group is for parents who need help coping with family issues. Call (661) 266-8700. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 6 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38530 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 273-1016. Expectant parents can tour the Antelope Valley Hospital obstetrics department, 1600 W. Ave. J in Lancaster, and get information on what to expect during hospitalization, at sessions starting at 6 p.m. Visitors meet in the main lobby.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWhy these photogenic dumplings are popping up in Los AngelesKids Managing Anger Together for ages 13-17 will meet, 4:30-6 p.m. at 38345 30th St. E., Suite. B-1, Palmdale. Court approved. Call (661) 266-8700. Low-cost Facilitated Women’s Group will deal with the death of a loved one, divorce, loss of relationship, infertility and other issues, noon-1:30 p.m. Call (661) 266-8700. Fobi-Lyte Support Group meets, 7-8:30 p.m. the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month to address the medical, nutritional and social ramifications of weight-loss surgery in fourth-floor Conference Room 16 at Antelope Valley Outpatient Imaging Center, 44105 15th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 723-5123. Caregivers Support Group meets, 7-8:30 p.m. the first and third Wednesdays of each month at Los Angeles Caregiver Resource Center, 44421 10th St. W., Suite I, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-4852. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. last_img read more

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RAPHOE BUILDER JAILED FOR 9 MONTHS FOR FORGING INCOME BOOKS

first_imgBREAKING NEWS: A Raphoe building contractor who ‘faked’ a set of invoice books and failed to make VAT returns of more than €110,000 has been jailed for nine months.Alan James Hynes claimed he panicked and had made a false set of books for a four month period between November 2005 and February 2006 during which his company took in €480,000.Hynes of AJH Construction was investigated by the Revenue Commissioners office on March 9th, 2006 as part of a general audit. Revenue investigator Ms Shiela Hanley told Letterkenny District Court this afternoon that on the face of it the books of AJH Construction were in order.However further investigation by the Revenue found large sums of money had been paid by large building contractors to the accused which had not been disclosed.When investigators challenged Hynes, of Sheercloon, Raphoe, about the non-payment of the VAT returns, he admitted he had not paid the returns and that he was operating a second set of ‘false’ books.The court heard how Hynes had two bank accounts with both ACC and Bank of Ireland and had tried to hide income from his business.Investigators from the Revenue Commissioner’s office examined Mr.Hynes’ accounts and sales books and found that VAT returns of €43,800 had not been paid on income between November and December of 2005.A further €65,673 in VAT returns on estimated income had not been paid for the months of January and February, 2006.During the time he had paid a total of €14,800 in VAT returns.Mr Hynes said he completely accepted what he had done was wrong and that he panicked and wrote up the false invoice books over a two day period.“I know what I did was wrong but I panicked. I am not denying that I did not pay VAT,” he said.Father-of-three Hynes added that his company went into liquidation as a result of the investigation by the Revenue Commissioner’s office and that he had to let eight workers go.Judge Seamus Hughes said his actions had cost up to eight people and their families their livelihoods.“I did find five of those people other jobs with other contractors,” replied Hynes.The court heard that Hynes had since had a serious motorbike accident and was confined to a wheelchair for a number of months and was now unable to work.Judge Hughes asked Hynes what he had done with all the money which he had failed to declare.He said he had pumped the majority of the money back into his business buying trailers, scaffolding and other equipment.“I don’t have invoices for what I spent the money on because I lost them when my office was being renovated,” said Hynes.Judge Hughes said this was fraud on a “massive, massive scale” and wanted to send out a message to dissuade other people from a similar offence.“I have no sympathy for him going out of business and if he had not he could have gone on to defraud the public out of a lot more money,” he saidJudge Hughes also fined Hynes €750 for failing to lodge an income tax return for 2005 and a further €750 for failing to lodge a VAT return for 2005.He also directed Hynes to file a tax return for the period.EndsRAPHOE BUILDER JAILED FOR 9 MONTHS FOR FORGING INCOME BOOKS was last modified: February 7th, 2011 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Crystal Palace vs Man United should be postponed, insists talkSPORT host

first_img latest MOST READ IN FOOTBALL Nemanja Matic is another one of those players currently sidelined for United Man United’s injury crisis should have resulted in the postponement of their Premier League clash with Crystal Palace.That’s according to talkSPORT’s Adrian Durham, as Ole Gunnar Solskjaer’s men head to Selhurst Park on Wednesday night without ten of their first-team squad owing to injury. Jesse Lingard was one of three United players to go off injured in the draw against Liverpool The average first-team salaries at every Premier League club in 2019 He added: “It’s an unusual set of circumstances. We don’t have many midweek fixtures in the Premier League throughout the season.“I love them, but what I don’t love is watching United’s second string playing. If this was a cup tie they’d be accused of playing a weakened side!“The Premier League is supposed to be the elite at the end of the day.“People pay a lot of money for tickets and television subscriptions to watch games and catch up on the highlights.“Yet in this instance we’re saying United have got to play this game, with most of their best players out injured. It baffles me.” tense Did Mahrez just accidentally reveal Fernandinho is leaving Man City this summer? Green reveals how he confronted Sarri after Chelsea’s 6-0 defeat at Man City Boxing Day fixtures: All nine Premier League games live on talkSPORT revealed SORRY 2 huge blow Oxlade-Chamberlain suffers another setback as Klopp confirms serious injury whoops Berahino hits back at b******t Johnson criticism – ‘I was in a dark place at Stoke’ Getty Liverpool news live: Klopp reveals when Minamino will play and issues injury update gameday cracker REPLY 2 Sky Sports presenter apologises for remarks made during Neville’s racism discussion “The Premier League is supposed to be the elite.””Manchester United have ten players out.””The game vs Crystal Palace tomorrow should be postponed.”Agree with @talkSPORTDrive? 🤔 pic.twitter.com/Dtjt5GH2fp— talkSPORT (@talkSPORT) February 26, 2019And Drivetime host Durham believes that in itself should have warranted the game being rescheduled.He said: “The game vs Crystal Palace tomorrow should have been postponed. Manchester United have 10 players out.“Even if you discount Mason Greenwood, a very talented youngster who isn’t a first-team regular, their injury list is crazy.“[Jesse] Lingard, [Juan] Mata, [Marcus] Rashford, [Ander] Herrera, [Phil] Jones, [Nemanja] Matic, {Matteo] Darmian, [Antonio] Valencia, [Anthony] Martial.“United have been robbed of all these players.”Durham says that while he relishes when the midweek fixtures come around in the top flight, the reputation of the league should be considered when such incidents like this arise.last_img read more

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Feature: How Alan Stern’s tenacity, drive, and command got a NASA spacecraft to Pluto

first_imgG. GRULLÓN/SCIENCEThere are 249 contingency plans in place, attempts to identify—and then mitigate—all known risks. They include not just risks to the spacecraft, like clouds of debris lurking among Pluto’s moons, but also those on the ground. Should something happen to the main mission control room, for example, New Horizons can be operated from a backup building at APL. There is even a backup to the backup: The team has prepped a minimalist control room—basically a New Horizons–compatible computer—at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California.And, oh, the practicing. Stern boasts of having performed 35 operational readiness tests—dress rehearsals for various aspects of the mission. In the biggest of these tests, 2 years ago, the spacecraft was put through the motions of its 9-day encounter, somewhere in the void between Uranus and Neptune, its instruments successfully returning precisely framed pictures of empty space. It’s not just about smooth operations; the team has also practiced making a splash. There have been three so-called New York Times readiness tests, in which the science team interpreted fake data on the fly, under time constraints, and produced press releases meant to be headline-worthy. To help, Stern hired six journalists, had them sign nondisclosure agreements, and embedded them within the science team. “I’d never heard of it,” Weaver says. “Several of us pushed back and said, ‘You know, we’re literate people. We can write our captions.’” Stern was unpersuaded. PAUL FETTERSStern speaks to the New Horizons science team in May.STERN’S RESTLESSNESS has many people wondering what he will do after the Pluto mission. That won’t be for a while. In August, the team will choose the mission’s next target: a small KBO. There are two candidates, each about 50 kilometers across and reachable in 2019. New Horizons’ next milestone will occur in the late 2040s, when it crosses the edge of the solar system, where the thin wind of particles from the sun peters out—though the spacecraft’s plutonium engine will have faded away a decade earlier. After exiting the solar system, New Horizons will wander the galaxy interminably, a relic that will outlive Earth, when the sun goes red giant and swallows it up.Leonard Stern sees a similar inexhaustibility in his son. “I don’t see Alan cutting back. He’s just not built that way. I think he thinks there’s just so much more that he needs to know. Nobody’s driving him but himself.”Related content:”Alan Stern’s worldly ventures” STARFIGHTERS INC.Stern trains for suborbital space flight in an F-104 jet in 2012.One does not get to the edge of the solar system by leaving things to chance. “This mission would not be flying unless he had shoved it down the throat of NASA,” says Stern’s longtime SWRI colleague, Hal Levison. “His force of will and his tenacity played a role in what’s happening right now.”SOL ALAN STERN WAS BORN on 22 November 1957, in New Orleans, Louisiana, the first of three children for Leonard and Joel Stern. He was a fussy baby, difficult to put down to bed. Taking him outside to see the moon seemed to induce sleep. “After many, many repeated applications of that, the first word out of his mouth was ‘moon,’” says Leonard Stern, his father. “Not ‘mama’ or ‘dada,’ but ‘moon.’”His fascination with celestial objects was galvanized by the space race of the 1960s. He sneaked out of bed to watch late-night TV broadcasts of the Gemini and Mercury flights. He exhausted the local library’s selection of space books. He devoured the science fiction of Isaac Asimov and Arthur C. Clarke. But he wanted more. “During one of the Apollo missions, I saw Walter Cronkite showing off the flight plan,” he says. “It just mesmerized me. All this detail! That’s what I wanted.” He requested the materials from NASA, but was told he had to be a journalist or an author. So in the early 1970s, he wrote a book—about a hypothetical mission to a comet. His grandfather’s secretary typed up the 100-plus pages, and Stern sent it off to NASA. “Next thing you know, a box this big shows up at my house, filled with Apollo manuals.” By then, the family had moved to Dallas, Texas, and Stern was enrolled at St. Mark’s, a prep school with a planetarium, an observatory, and an astronomy club. “That is all my brother ate, drank, slept, and breathed,” recalls his brother, Leonard “Happy” Stern. “Everything in his being was about how to be in space.” The video cameras are poised. Alan Stern is loath to miss a cue. Dressed in all black, he strides across the parking lot. Short in stature, Stern has legs that move faster than most people’s, and a mind that is generally several steps ahead, too. The camera crew, from the Japanese network NHK, is one of four following Stern, a planetary scientist from the Southwest Research Institute (SWRI) in Boulder, Colorado. They draw a bead on him for an early morning establishing shot. Stern executes a quick flyby. “Hi, Mom,” he says, giving a thumbs-up as he enters the space science building at Johns Hopkins University’s Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Maryland.Above him in the atrium dangles a half-size replica of New Horizons, a NASA spacecraft. Its life-size twin is now cruising through space nearly 5 billion kilometers from Earth, adding more than a million kilometers to its journey each day. The spacecraft is surprisingly small, not much bigger than Stern. But, like him, it is packed with purpose. It is swaddled in layers of foil to protect its instruments and computers from the searing cold. Solar panels would be pointless so far from the sun, and so an engine of radioactive plutonium pulses inside. The backside is dominated by a large radio dish, necessary to talk with Earth across an expanse that takes 4.5 hours for light to traverse.center_img NASA/JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY APPLIED PHYSICS LABORATORY/SOUTHWEST RESEARCH INSTITUTESign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Pluto on 18 June at a distance of 31.5 million kilometers.New Horizons is closing in on Pluto, once thought to be the last of the planets and a lonely outpost on the solar system’s edge. Discovered in 1930, Pluto has remained something of a cipher, despite the best efforts of telescopes in space and on the ground. Its changing atmosphere and variegated surface remain mysterious, and even its size is not precisely known. In 2006, Pluto was demoted to a dwarf planet, a move that still annoys Stern. Yet in a karmic reversal, Pluto’s scientific and public popularity—its brand, Stern might say—has soared. Pluto is now not the final stop in the solar system, but a gatekeeper to a new frontier: the Kuiper belt, a region of thousands of small icy bodies beyond Neptune’s orbit that was theorized by astronomer Gerard Kuiper in 1951 but confirmed only in 1992. No longer the smallest of the planets, Pluto is the king of the Kuiper belt.On 14 July, New Horizons will zoom past it—50 years to the day after Mariner 4 flew past Mars and returned the first pictures from another planet. Stern has been working toward this moment for half of that half-century: 10 years to muster political and scientific will for a mission, 5 years to build the spacecraft, and nearly 10 years to make the trip. He is the principal investigator for the $700 million mission—the largest and most expensive one ever controlled by a non-NASA employee. Now he is 99% of the way there.Stern has traveled from Boulder to APL on this day in May to kick off the final science team meeting before the encounter. In a conference room, 50 people hunch over their laptops. On a screen overhead, a video rouses the team: an electronic anthem mashed-up with snippets of control room dialogue from the Apollo 11 moon mission. “Guidance? Go! Control? Go!” shout the ghosts of mission controllers past. Hal Weaver, the project scientist for the mission and a laid-back foil to Stern and his intensity, says, “Alan is going to have this choreographed.” In the 30 days prior to reaching Pluto, Stern wants different pep songs played each morning.Stern takes the podium. Although everything is going great, he says, there are things that could still go wrong. “If it’s bugging you, let’s make sure we bring it up,” he says. His words are cautious, but his tone—commanding, emphatic, confident—is devoid of doubt. “We have the eyes of the world on this mission. It is unlike any other mission in recent history in terms of the expected level of attention. And in addition, we only get one shot at it. It’s not an orbiter. It’s not a lander.” It’s a flyby, at Mach 42, and Stern must wring as much out of the short-lived encounter as possible.Landings on planets (and comets) advertise their complexity with parachutes and airbags, harpoons and retrorockets. Even orbiters, with the tricky, fiery burn of orbital insertion, contain an element of drama. In comparison, a flyby seems a walk in the park—just gravity in motion, and a few clicks of a camera shutter. So you’ll forgive Stern for emphasizing how complicated the flyby actually is. In the 9 days of “core encounter”—7 days before closest approach on 14 July to 2 days after—New Horizons will run through 20,799 commands. It must scan the path ahead for hazardous debris, make minor trajectory corrections, and point instruments for 461 scientific observations as it passes within 12,500 kilometers of Pluto’s surface. In the hours just after closest approach, the spacecraft must pass through two tiny keyholes in space—the shadows of Pluto and its largest moon, Charon—so that it can use the eclipsed sun as a backlight to examine the thin ring of atmosphere around each body. As it leaves the system of five moons (at last count), New Horizons will continue to stare, and image Pluto’s dark side by Charon’s moonlight. “Despite the fact that we’ve done a lot of practicing, we can’t simulate everything,” Stern says. “My biggest concern is what we haven’t thought of.” STERN FAMILY PHOTOGRAPHScientific enthusiasm at age 6.He was gaining other skill sets, too. In 1976, while NASA was landing the Viking probes on Mars, Stern finished his freshman year at the University of Texas (UT), Austin, and took a summer job selling Collier’s Encyclopedias. After a tutorial from his father, a salesman for a chemical company, he spent a couple of months crisscrossing the state, knocking on doors. He netted several thousand dollars, enough to trade in his beat-up Buick Skyhawk for an Oldsmobile Cutlass.Stern has told his father that 80% of what he does now is a sales game. “He learned that selling those encyclopedias, and he’s never forgotten it,” Leonard says. Stern demurs. “I object to putting [the Pluto mission] on par with selling encyclopedias,” he says. “If you equate the two, it does a disservice to all the other people involved.”Articulate in front of a microphone and at ease in front of a camera, Stern is an eager media subject, sometimes to the irritation of his colleagues. “He likes to generate press for himself, and he is sort of making [the mission] about him,” says Levison, one of the few people confident enough in his friendship with Stern to say so. Stern is aware of the criticism, and he declared his qualms about this profile at the outset. “There has to be a recognition that it’s not the Alan Stern mission,” he said.Besides honing his talent for persuasion, the young Stern was becoming a careful planner. After graduating from UT in 1978 as a physics major, Stern re-enrolled as a master’s student, and roomed with his brother. Happy Stern recalls discovering Alan’s day planner. It included not only a 5 a.m. wake up, but also entries, 5 minutes apart, for showering, brushing his teeth, and combing his hair. “You don’t think this is a little strange here, pal?” Happy asked him. To this day, Stern carries a sheet of SWRI stationery with him 7 days a week, a black-inked to-do list on which every entry is to be scratched out in red ink by bedtime.STERN GOT HIS FIRST TASTE of Pluto while a graduate student. Charon had just been discovered in 1978, and astronomers had seen hints that Pluto has an atmosphere—one that would experience strong seasons because of Pluto’s highly elliptical orbit and large tilt to the sun. For his master’s thesis, Stern modeled the range of atmospheric possibilities. The scope for creative work was enticing, he says. “It was like a green field. You could go anywhere with this.”Stern pursued a double master’s, in aerospace engineering and planetary science, in hope of becoming an astronaut candidate. He also became a certified pilot and flight instructor. He met his wife, Carole, while teaching a ground-school flying class, and later proposed to her under the Saturn V rocket on display at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. “You don’t forget that, I’ll tell ya,” she says.Stern never made the cut as an astronaut, in part because of a detached retina. So he did the next best thing: He built instruments for astronauts. By 1983, he was working as an engineer at the University of Colorado’s Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics. He became the project scientist for Spartan Halley, a small satellite designed to study Halley’s Comet, and the principal investigator for the Comet Halley Active Monitoring Program, an experiment in which a crew member aboard the space shuttle would take pictures of the comet with a specially adapted 35-millimeter camera. Both instruments were loaded on the space shuttle Challenger for launch on 28 January 1986.“Dick Scobee, Ron McNair, Judy Resnik, [Ellison] Onizuka, Mike Smith.” Stern recites the names of five of the seven crew members who died that day when Challenger disintegrated just after launch, people he had trained and knew well. Stern was in Florida for the launch. Then he saw the disaster replayed again and again on the news. “Even if you tried, you couldn’t get away from this,” he says. It was not just a human loss for Stern, but also a professional disaster, his brother says. “Now he doesn’t have a plan, and my brother had a plan for brushing his teeth. I think he was a little lost then.”Stern did not stay down for long. He published his first book, one that seemed to be something of a therapy session. It was called The U.S. Space Program After Challenger: Where Are We Going? Then he went back to school. He finished his Ph.D. in 1989, in just 3 years, writing a dissertation on the evolution of comets and their detectability around other stars. The scientifically minded engineer had become a scientist for life.Not only that, but also a scientific empire builder. Knowing he was not cut out for an academic job—you can imagine his patience tested by faculty senate meetings—Stern found a home at SWRI headquarters in sleepy San Antonio, Texas. SWRI, a soft-money research institute, did most of its business with the Department of Defense. Stern made a pitch to his bosses to stake out a new SWRI outpost in Boulder, devoted to space science. Stern arrived in 1994—just him, a postdoctoral researcher, and a secretary. His first recruit was Levison, an expert on modeling planetary orbits and collisions. “A lot of people [at SWRI] were nervous about taking that sort of risk,” Levison says. “Alan in his mastery of politics made it all work.” The SWRI Boulder operation today employs 55 scientists and takes in $40 million a year in revenue.AS STERN’S STAR ROSE, so did Pluto’s. For the first 4 decades after its discovery, little could be said about Pluto except that it was small, reddish, and frigid. Even its orbit—observed so far only a third of the way through its 248-year circuit of the sun—was poorly understood. After Charon’s discovery, astronomers could watch its dance with Pluto to calculate both bodies’ masses. Then, in 1985, Charon and Pluto began eclipsing each other. Ground-based telescopes could barely resolve the two disks, but by measuring the peaks and dips of reflected light as the two orbs passed in and out of each other’s shadows, astronomers discovered that Pluto was about half as big as previously thought, and brighter than Charon. In 1988, Pluto eclipsed a distant star, and the light shining around Pluto’s edges afforded the first definitive evidence of an atmosphere.Then came a sign that Pluto was not alone: the 1992 discovery of the first Kuiper belt object (KBO). Pluto, it seemed, represented a much larger class of icy bodies. And because KBOs are thought to be unaltered since the birth of the solar system 4.5 billion years ago, Pluto held the potential of unlocking insights into the earliest days of planet formation.By the mid-1990s, astronomers were clamoring for a visit, and soon. In 1989, Pluto reached perihelion—the closest point to the sun in its elliptical orbit. Scientists wanted to get there before Pluto began its slow retreat from the sun and temperatures plummeted, collapsing its atmosphere into frozen nitrogen. What’s more, a spacecraft launched between 2001 and 2006 could take advantage of Jupiter’s gravity for a slingshot effect that would shave years off the trip.The Pluto Kuiper Express, a mission concept led by JPL, got the farthest. But in 2000, NASA science chief Ed Weiler canceled the mission when its projected costs surpassed $1 billion. Later that year, Weiler was persuaded to try something different: a Pluto competition. A competition for low-cost planetary missions led by principal investigators from outside NASA, called Discovery, had already yielded innovative proposals costing just hundreds of millions of dollars, well short of the billion-dollar budget of a flagship NASA mission. With target costs in the half a billion dollar range, a Pluto competition would sit somewhere between a Discovery mission and a flagship. NASA announced the competition on 20 December 2000.Stamatios “Tom” Krimigis, then the space department head at APL, leaped at the chance. At that point, only JPL had been trusted to build and operate NASA’s big planetary missions. But in 1996, APL had launched NASA’s first Discovery mission, an asteroid orbiter. With JPL’s budget-busting tendencies, Krimigis knew that APL would have a chance. And he knew exactly who should lead the proposal: Alan Stern. “He was the personification of the Pluto mission,” Krimigis says. “He was single-minded, and I liked his style.”The duo inked an agreement 2 days after the NASA announcement and began assembling their team. The final proposal was due on 18 September 2001—1 week after the terrorist attacks in New York City. With APL shut down, Stern created a “war room” in a nearby hotel to put the finishing touches on it. In the end, though, it wasn’t much of a competition, Weiler says. “Alan was the clear winner.”That was just the beginning of the fight. The Bush administration had installed a new NASA administrator, Sean O’Keefe, who was no fan of the mission, and was instead pushing the idea of nuclear fission–powered spacecraft. When the federal budget request for 2003 came out, in February 2002, the administration had zeroed out the Pluto mission, effectively canceling it.Weiler challenged Stern to rally planetary scientists’ support for the mission in the decadal survey, a once-a-decade, prioritized wish list that’s meant to reflect science’s unified voice. For months, Stern lobbied tirelessly. When the report appeared in July 2002, the Pluto mission held the top spot in the medium-size mission category, ahead of missions to the moon and to Jupiter. “That’s what really broke the logjam,” Weiler says. “My administration was not going to fight that.”Stern’s team raced to build New Horizons before the gravity assist window closed. The finished spacecraft carried seven instruments, including a student-built interplanetary dust counter and a sensor to measure the energy of particles escaping from Pluto’s atmosphere. Novelties were also stowed aboard: cremated ashes of Pluto’s discoverer, Clyde Tombaugh; an old U.S. stamp of Pluto with the caption “Not yet explored”; a piece of SpaceShipOne, private space company Virgin Galactic’s first suborbital space vehicle; and two quarters: one from Maryland, whose Senator Barbara Mikulski had given the mission crucial support at its lowest ebb, and one from Florida, where then-Governor Jeb Bush had signed off on the launch of the plutonium-laden spacecraft.On 13 January 2006, Stern, wearing a clean-room suit and a radiation counter, went to the top of an Atlas V rocket to take one last look. The probe had just been filled with plutonium. Stern posed for a picture, and New Horizons was shut within the payload bay. The Atlas had been souped up with extra boosters and a never-before-used third stage. Six days later, it launched like a bottle rocket, going supersonic within 30 seconds. “This was not a stately shuttle launch,” Stern says. New Horizons left Earth faster than any spacecraft ever before.WITH 9 YEARS TO GO until Pluto arrival, Stern suddenly had a lot more time on his hands. But not for long. In 2007, NASA Administrator Mike Griffin asked Stern to come to Washington, D.C., to lead the agency’s $5 billion science division. Upon arrival, Stern asserted his vision of fiscal discipline. He came down hard on missions such as the exoplanet-hunting Kepler telescope, denying it extra funds. He tried to discipline NASA’s costly array of Mars missions, too.Curiosity, the $2.5 billion, JPL-built Mars rover, was running hundreds of millions of dollars over budget in an effort to meet a 2009 launch window. Stern wanted to limit the pain to JPL and, more generally, to the Mars program, to ensure that other science wouldn’t suffer. In March 2008, he had a subordinate dispatch a letter to JPL ordering it to hold $4 million of money planned for two operating rovers, Spirit and Opportunity, as a reserve for Curiosity. Stern was soon accused of shutting down the beloved older rovers. Griffin, learning about the letter from the media, reversed the decision.Stern says the $4 million was just a footnote; he and Griffin disagreed more generally over how to apportion the pain of Curiosity cost overruns. “I said, ‘You need to find someone else who can deal with that, because I can’t stomach it,’” Stern says. He offered his resignation, and Griffin accepted it.Weiler returned to Washington to resume his old job. Stern had overestimated the power of the position, Weiler says: “He had a hard time realizing you get to make very, very few decisions.”It was the second time in Stern’s life that he had suffered a big loss. Once again, he dusted himself off. He returned to SWRI as a half-time employee. His other time was spent consulting for commercial space companies such as Virgin Galactic and Blue Origin and also setting up a few of his own—some of which have raised eyebrows (see “Alan Stern’s worldly ventures”).But for now, Stern’s focus is squarely on Pluto. He will be living out of a hotel near APL for the coming weeks, enduring 4:30 a.m. wake-ups and battling his inbox, which at its peak reaches 500 emails a day. At the science team meeting, Stern is about to leave the podium and retreat to a corner table. There, flanked by his assistant, he will whipsaw between email, Twitter, Facebook, and Space.com, one eye always on the proceedings. But before he sits down, he leaves his troops with one last thought. “I said this when we won the project,” he says. “It’s true again. Our time is finally here.”last_img read more

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Q&A with Jennifer Morgan: How Do We Secure a Strong, International Climate Agreement by 2015?

first_imgAs climate change impacts like heat waves, increased precipitation, and sea level rise continue to reverberate around the world, the need for action has never been clearer. Reducing greenhouse gas emissions and transitioning to a low-carbon economy will require a global effort. Many are looking to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), an international treaty to avoid dangerous global warming, to deliver the progress we need.On that front, the next few years will be critical. Under the UNFCCC, countries around the world committed to produce an international climate action agreement. This agreement will be finalized at the annual Conference of the Parties, meeting in Paris in 2015 (COP 21). How UNFCCC negotiations progress between now and then will in part determine whether the world curbs climate change—or feels its worsening effects.I caught up with Jennifer Morgan, director of WRI’s Climate and Energy programs, to discuss what’s at stake and what steps are needed between now and 2015 to ensure a strong, international climate action plan.1) The U.N. has held international climate change negotiations (Conferences of the Parties, or COPs) annually for the past two decades. Why is COP 21 in 2015 such an important meeting?At the 2011 COP in Durban, South Africa, countries under the UNFCCC agreed to establish a binding international climate action agreement. That negotiation is scheduled to be completed in 2015 at COP 21 in Paris. This meeting is important because whatever agreement is established will act as a blueprint and catalyst for future international climate action.But beyond that, COP 21 comes at a particularly important time in history. The impacts of climate change are occurring faster than many scientists had projected—we’re seeing them in the form of sea level rise, heat waves, and other damaging extreme weather events. The International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) recently stated—yet again—that climate change is human-driven, and that we only have a short window of time to respond as a global community. Collective action is key. The one place where that collective action can truly occur is in the United Nations, where all countries are represented.Jennifer Morgan is the director of WRI’s Climate and Energy program. 2) One of the goals of the UNFCCC is limiting global temperature rise to 2 degrees C above pre-industrial levels. Why is this target important?This target is important for two reasons: The first is because with every degree of warming, the impacts of climate change become increasingly severe. For example, according to the World Bank, forest fires in the Amazon will nearly double by 2050 in a 2-degree-warmer world. It is also important because it sends a signal as to what kind of global economy we need to build to stay below two degrees. According to experts, we need to achieve a net phase-out GHGs to zero by 2050 if we want to have a high probability of staying below 2 degrees. This is the kind of clear direction business and investors understand.3) Best-case scenario: What will the 2015 international climate agreement do?The best-case scenario is that heads of state will understand the clear need for and agree to a plan where all countries will, in a fair fashion, reduce their emissions enough to stay well within the 2-degree target. This would send a clear signal for action to lawmakers, businesspeople, investors, and the public. It would inspire greater confidence among low-carbon investors and lower confidence among high-carbon investors.This will require an ambitious agreement that can last over a long period and provide a mechanism to ratchet up commitments regularly.Specifically, a strong agreement would secure ambitious and equitable commitments from countries so that they will move away from heavily polluting fuels such as coal and move quickly towards renewable energy. It will be especially important to get these commitments from major economies such as the United States, Europe, China, and Brazil.The agreement will also need to provide clarity regarding each country’s national emissions-reduction plan, so as to build confidence around the world that decisions are being made to shift quickly to a different economic pathway. It also needs to deal with the fact that the impacts of climate change are already occurring, and the most vulnerable countries do not have the capacity to adapt. The agreement, therefore, will need to deliver sufficient public and private financing to support developing countries—particularly the poorest—in adapting to climate impacts and transitioning to lower-carbon pathways.4) What will happen if we don’t get an agreement in place by 2015?Time is running out. Based on IPCC findings, WRI has calculated that the world is burning through its carbon budget so quickly that we will lock in 2 degrees of temperature rise in the next 30 years unless we change course now. The differences between managing a 2 degrees C increase and a 4 degrees C increase—which the World Bank predicts is possible by the 2060s if current mitigation commitments are not met—are massive. Just two small degrees means either survival or complete devastation for some countries. Things many today take for granted, like food security, will become a common challenge. Several types of extreme weather events that are happening on a less regular basis will become the “new normal.” We don’t want to imagine this world, but I think we have to in order to understand that we have to make choices now—quickly—to avoid it.5) We still have two years to go until COP 21. What big things need to happen between now and then to achieve a desirable outcome?Leaders around the world need to truly understand the risks they are facing and make clear choices for change. Climate change impacts entire countries and their relations to each other, so heads of state are the natural decision-makers on this issue. Each needs to understand what is at stake for his or her country, and then rise above the current national political discourse and make strategic choices for the future. There is a tremendous amount of action happening on the ground by people who have understood what is at stake and are acting as best they can to respond. These voices often get drowned out by the industries that want to keep the status quo because it is profitable for them.Clearly the leaders of the largest economies – the United States, Europe, China, Japan, Brazil, and India – will be in the spotlight. What they each decide—individually and collectively—will have a massive impact on the lives of people around the world.6) What about COP 19 in Warsaw, which begins next week? What goals must this COP achieve to set the stage for COP 20 and COP 21?The 2015 agreement will not just come out of one meeting in 2015. It will come out of many preparatory rounds of negotiations that work through the key issues. Warsaw, in that sense, is more of a “working COP” – to get the steps in place over the next two years to succeed in Paris.However, it needs to also be an “action COP,” where new initiatives and commitments are brought forward to reduce emissions now—rather than waiting for 2015 and beyond. For example, the Alliance of Small Island States (AOSIS) has tabled a proposal for cooperative action on renewable energy and energy efficiency. Countries should not wait to take action on these types of initiatives until a new agreement is resolved.7) We’ve seen ebbs and flows when it comes to momentum on climate action. For example, COP 15 in Copenhagen was expected to produce an international climate agreement, but was largely viewed as a disappointment. Are there signs that things will be different this time around?The Copenhagen meeting was disappointing in many ways, but it did push heads-of-state to engage in decision-making and generate national commitments that were previously unthinkable. But we need to do better this time—and there’s more momentum to do so.There are many examples of countries making strides towards a low-carbon economy—and reaping significant benefits. Germany’s clean energy sector, for example, grew by 122 percent since 2004, creating an industry that supports nearly 380,000 jobs. The price of clean energy has dropped dramatically, and renewables are now the fastest-growing power generation sector in the world. And unfortunately, the impacts of climate change are being felt. These impacts can be powerful motivators for action.It is important for decision-makers and the public this time to really link those national and local realities with the international agreement, and use this agreement to drive change.The agreement should assist those working on the ground to shift to a low-carbon economy. It should provide the support for people dealing with the impacts of climate change in their own communities. We have an opportunity to make the agreement much more linked to the real economy and the national debates around the world. We need to grasp that.8) An international climate agreement has clear environmental benefits. But what about the economic and social impacts?If we don’t reduce emissions smartly now, we will have to reduce by significant annual amounts later, which is more expensive to do. This was one of the main findings of the latest UNEP Gap Report. We’ll also deal with increasingly costly and damaging impacts. Last year, for example, the United States alone saw 11 extreme weather events that each caused more than $1 billion in damages.If the world jumps together, it can manage together – and even benefit from the opportunities at hand. We have already seen these benefits happening on a smaller scale with renewables. Germany, for example, invested in renewable energy to drive technology development. It’s seen significant benefits in terms of hundreds of thousands of new jobs, decreased emissions, and reduced energy consumption. China produced renewable energy at scale and drove down prices. People everywhere benefit from switching from coal to clean energy—just look at the coal-induced air pollution that places like China are experiencing right now. If we delay climate action, we could miss out on many of the economic and social opportunities.9) I understand that all countries—both developing and developed—must come forward with emissions-reductions plans. But is leadership from particular countries especially important?It is clear that there are a handful of countries that are deeply relevant to tackling this problem, due to their size and their resource base. Certainly the two largest emitters today – China and the United States—are key players. Both are starting to move. China is implementing a whole suite of policies to reduce its dependence on coal and embrace clean energy, including piloting a regional cap-and-trade program. The United States recently announced a Climate Action Plan, and is in the process of introducing standards to reduce GHGs in the power sector. But they both need to go farther faster to show they are taking serious action to de-carbonize their economies.Europe has historically been a leader on climate change and continues to act, but a new spirit is needed. Hopefully Chancellor Merkel, a physicist and former environment minister, will re-engage and empower Europe to lead the way to the low-carbon economy. Brazil’s role in the world has also shifted. I expect many will be looking to President Dilma for a path forward that includes sustainable, inclusive livelihoods for Brazilians.10) Is 2015 an end goal, or a starting point?It should be a turning point. This should be the year when the world’s leaders finally take this bull by the horns and show they deeply understand the risks and are ready to deal with them. Once that turning point happens, then hopefully change can occur at the necessary scale.It is important to understand that the 2015 agreement is one key tool in the toolbox to move the world towards a low-carbon economy. What countries do at the national level and through international initiatives like “low-carbon clubs” are also important. But the 2015 agreement is a critical opportunity: It is a chance for collective action to address the most pressing issue of our time.LEARN MORE: Check out WRI’s COP 19 webpage for additional resources.last_img read more

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India Red clinch Duleep Trophy after Akshay Wakhare, Abhimanyu Easwaran star in innings win

first_img Indo-Asian News Service BengaluruSeptember 7, 2019UPDATED: September 7, 2019 17:24 IST Abhimanyu Easwaran scored 153 to setup victory for India Red (IANS Photo)HIGHLIGHTSAbhimanyu Easwaran scored 153 to setup victory for India RedAkshay Wakhare finished with figures of 5/13 in less than 6 oversSiddhesh Lad (42) was the top-scorer for India Green in their 2nd inningsRight-arm off-spinner Akshay Wakhare picked up a brilliant five-wicket haul to hand India Red the Duleep Trophy title as they defeated India Green by an innings and 38 runs in the final on Saturday.On the final day of the match, India Red bowled out India Green for a mere 119 runs inside 40 overs at the Chinnaswamy Stadium. Only Siddhesh Lad (42) and Akshath Reddy (33) could manage to stay at the crease for a while as none of the India Green batters were able to cope with the pressure created by Wakhare and Avesh Khan. The duo finished with figures of 5/13 and 3/38 respectively.Earlier in the day, India Red started from their overnight score of 345/6, 114 runs ahead of India Green’s first-innings total of 231. Aditya Sarvate and Jaydev Unadkat, who had remained unbeaten on 30 and 10 on Stumps on Day 3, managed to add another 8 and 22 respectively to their individual scores as India Red were eventually bundled out for 388 runs.Abhimanyu Easwaran, who played a stupendous knock of 153, was the leading run-scorer for India Red. Apart from him, Ishan Kishan (39), Aditya Sarwate (38) and captain Priyank Panchal (33) also made noticeable contributions to help the team reach a total which ultimately they defended to clinch the trophy.Dharmendrasinh Jadeja and Ankit Rajpoot were the pick of the bowlers for India Green as they both scalped 3 wickets each. Left-arm seamer Tanveer-Ul-Haq contributed with two wickets, including that of Easwaran while Mayank Markande also picked one wicket. Easwaran was adjudged the Player of the Match.Brief scores: India Green 231 and 119 (Siddhesh Lad, 42, Akshath Reddy 33; Akshay Wakhare 5/13); India Red 388 (Abhimanyu Easwaran 153, Ishan Kishan 39; Dharmendrasinh Jadeja 3/93)advertisementAlso Read | Completely agree with Sourav Ganguly, Rohit Sharma should open for India in Tests: Gautam GambhirAlso Read | For me, every Test match is my last: Hanuma Vihari after successful West Indies seriesFor sports news, updates, live scores and cricket fixtures, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for Sports news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byAjay Tiwari Tags :Follow Duleep Trophy India Red clinch Duleep Trophy after Akshay Wakhare, Abhimanyu Easwaran star in innings winOff-spinner Akshay Wakhare’s 5 wickets resigned India Green to 119-all out in their 2nd innings thereby handing India Red a hefty victory by an innings and 38 runs in Bengaluru.advertisement Nextlast_img read more

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