Times always dropping, Gophers looking to make a run at Badgers

first_imgâÄúItâÄôs not like the other teams are standing still, but thatâÄôs a big jump in three weeks,âÄù Davis said.The Gophers are also closer to full strength heading into the dual. Sophomore Becky Kinchen will row in the second varsity eight after missing the last month with an illness. Nearly 10 members of the top two boats have fallen ill at times this spring, Davis said, but she thinks âÄúthe little bugâÄôs run its course.âÄùDavis suggests adding alumni to booster clubThe Gophers held a 10-year anniversary party at the boathouse last Saturday, during which Davis said she promoted the idea of changing the makeup of the teamâÄôs booster club.Parents used to run the booster club, but the inevitable turnover led to problems. Davis hopes to have some alumni to step in and run the club.âÄúWe would like the alums to get a vibrant booster club going,âÄù she said. âÄúNow that we have 10 years of alums I think itâÄôs the perfect time to get something like that going.âÄùAbout 50 former rowers attended SaturdayâÄôs event, many of whom were on the 2000-01 team when the Gophers switched from a club to a varsity sport. Highlights of the first 10 years for Davis include beating Iowa and Wisconsin in 2002 and forcing an NCAA noise ordinance in 2004 for having such loud fans. Times always dropping, Gophers looking to make a run at BadgersMinn. has been aided by consecutive weeks of practice on open water. Josh KatzensteinApril 28, 2011Jump to CommentsShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare via EmailPrintWhen the Gophers rowing team saw Wisconsin three weeks ago, the Badgers were the much faster team.But Minnesota has finally had consecutive days âÄî even weeks âÄî of practicing on open water, and the Gophers are hoping to narrow that gap when the two face off Sunday.âÄúThey were so much faster than us three weeks ago, but theyâÄôve gotten more water time and weâÄôve gotten more water time,âÄù head coach Wendy Davis said. âÄúWe want to go out there and be as fast as we can possibly be on Sunday and not allow nerves or choking or any of that stuff.âÄúWe want to say, âÄòThis is the best weâÄôve got,âÄô and put it on the line.âÄùWisconsin and Minnesota competed against Michigan and Michigan State, but not each other, in the Big Ten Double Duals on April 9. In the morning session of the meet, WisconsinâÄôs first varsity eight was 12 seconds faster than MinnesotaâÄôs. The BadgersâÄô second varsity eight finished the course 16 seconds faster than the Gophers.The final race of the regular season starts Sunday at 8 a.m. in Madison, Wis., just two weeks before the Big Ten championships.Having practice time on the water allowed Davis and the Minnesota staff to tweak the lineup during practice and deduce which is the fastest. Even though Davis hasnâÄôt decided on this weekendâÄôs lineup, she said she could see the all-around improvement, noting that some boats have cut as much as four seconds per 500 meters.last_img read more

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The new SAT: Aptitude testing for college admissions falls out of favor

first_imgThe Washington Post:There’s a reason the College Board scrubbed “aptitude” from the name of its big admission test two decades ago. The idea of a Scholastic Aptitude Test left the organization open to criticism that it believed some people were born to go to college and some weren’t.The latest version of what is now simply called the SAT drops questions about arcane vocabulary, continuing a long move away from testing for aptitude as the College Board seeks to tie the exam more closely to what students learn in the classroom. Previous revisions had dropped antonym, analogy and quantitative-comparison questions that were also seen as detached from the nation’s school curriculum.…“If students’ preparations differ (e.g. at good schools vs. bad schools), achievement will go down in the bad schools. That is why we call them ‘bad,’” Earl Hunt, professor emeritus of psychology at the University of Washington, said in an e-mail. “Aptitude tests, which emphasize more ‘on the spot’ reasoning over recall of facts, can be used to identify talent or lack of it amongst students with poor preparation.”Read the whole story: The Washington Post More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more

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What the Marshmallow Test Really Teaches About Self-Control

first_img More of our Members in the Media > The Atlantic: The image is iconic: A little kid sits at a table, his face contorted in concentration, staring down a marshmallow. Over the last 50 years, the “Marshmallow Test” has become synonymous with temptation, willpower, and grit. Walter Mischel’s work permeates popular culture. There are “Don’t Eat the Marshmallow!” t-shirts and Sesame Street episodes where Cookie Monster learns delayed gratification so he can join the Cookie Connoisseurs Club. Investment companies have used the Marshmallow Test to encourage retirement planning. And when I mentioned to friends that I was interviewing the Marshmallow Man about his new book, The Marshmallow Test: Mastering Self-Control, nobody missed the reference.It began in the early 1960s at Stanford University’s Bing Nursery School, where Mischel and his graduate students gave children the choice between one reward (like a marshmallow, pretzel, or mint) they could eat immediately, and a larger reward (two marshmallows) for which they would have to wait alone, for up to 20 minutes. Years later, Mischel and his team followed up with the Bing preschoolers and found that children who had waited for the second marshmallow generally fared better in life. For example, studies showed that a child’s ability to delay eating the first treat predicted higher SAT scores and a lower body mass index (BMI) 30 years after their initial Marshmallow Test. Researchers discovered that parents of “high delayers” even reported that they were more competent than “instant gratifiers”—without ever knowing whether their child had gobbled the first marshmallow.Read the whole story: The Atlanticlast_img read more

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West Africa Ebola toll grows, along with cautious optimism

first_imgAs Ebola virus disease (EVD) continued to surge in West Africa, pushing Liberia into the top spot for total cases, World Health Organization (WHO) officials said today they see encouraging signs in Nigeria and Guinea.Between Aug 14 and 16 the outbreak region reported 113 new EVD cases and 84 deaths.  However, the numbers from Liberia are only from Aug 15. The developments push the outbreak’s overall total to 2,240 EVD cases and 1,229 deaths.Of the new cases, Liberia reported 48, as well as 53 deaths, lifting its total to 834 cases, the most of any country. Since last week the country has had the most deaths, which have now reached 466.In other outbreak countries, Sierra Leone reported 38 more illnesses, along with 17 deaths, and Guinea reported 24 more EVD cases and 14 additional fatalities. In Nigeria, which doesn’t share a border with the other countries but has illnesses linked to a patient who flew in from Liberia, health officials reported three more illnesses.Contact tracing curbs EVD in NigeriaIn a separate situation assessment today, the WHO said the EVD situation in Nigeria’s capital, Lagos, is encouraging, because all 12 confirmed cases there are part of a single transmission chain, which has included medical staff, a patient in the same hospital, and a protocol officer who had close contact with the patient.The index patient was a Liberian government consultant who had traveled to Lagos while sick on Jul 20. He died from his infection on Jul 25.The WHO said the man vomited several times during his trip and that no other passengers got sick. It added that intensive contact tracing, done with help from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), hasn’t identified any other confirmed cases outside the initial transmission chain.Also, the agency said the full recovery of one of the man’s contacts is a bright spot: “It counters the widespread perception that infection with the Ebola virus is invariably a death sentence. Evidence suggests that early detection and supportive therapy increase the prospects of survival.”Intensive monitoring efforts provide hope that EVD spread in Nigeria, where the search for more cases continues, can be stopped, the WHO said.Public awareness lends hope in GuineaIn Guinea, the Ebola outbreak is not under control, but the situation is less dire than in Sierra Leone and Liberia, according to the WHO.It credited an improvement in disease control to higher public awareness about the disease, which has been fostered by innovative tactics. For example, the WHO said respected community leaders have been used to help win the cooperation of 26 villages that resisted outside assistance.Opening up the area triggered a surge of reported cases that had previously been hidden. The WHO advised that reporting of those cases shouldn’t be interpreted as a sharp surge in Guinea’s EVD totals.The WHO warned that the progress is fragile, and disease activity could flare up again, as it did earlier in the outbreak. Health officials in Guinea reported a case last week in a previously unaffected area, a sign that the disease continues to spread to new areas, the agency added.Missing EVD patients turn up in LiberiaIn Liberian outbreak developments, suspected EVD patients who fled a holding center in the capital, Monrovia, that was attacked on Aug 16 by looters have turned themselves in to a hospital, the Associated Press (AP) reported today.Liberia’s information minister, Lewis Brown, told the AP that the last 17 who were missing are now at a treatment center at a major hospital and that none of the ones who fled had confirmed infections. They were at the holding center because they were at risk for EVD and are now being tested, he said.According to earlier media reports, the attack was fueled by the location of the holding center in a school in the city’s biggest slum, and looters said they didn’t believe the disease is real. They apparently made off with items from the clinic, including mattresses and soiled linens. See also:Aug 19 WHO situation assessmentAug 19 WHO updateAug 19 AP storylast_img read more

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WHO reports 3 more Ebola cases in Mali

first_imgTwo days after expressing guarded confidence that Mali’s first Ebola case had not triggered any more infections, the World Health Organization (WHO) today reported an unrelated fatal Ebola infection in a Malian nurse who worked at a clinic in the nation’s capital where a 70-year-old man from neighboring Guinea had died of probable Ebola but was not tested.The Guinean man was visited in the clinic in Bamako, Mali, by a friend who subsequently died of an unknown illness, and the friend’s illness was probably Ebola as well, the WHO said. The three new fatal cases (one confirmed, two probable) raised Mali’s total to four.The three new cases are unrelated to the first one, the WHO said. Mali’s first case involved a 2-year-old girl from Guinea who died Oct 24 in Kayes, Mali, after being brought there by a relative. Her case and the nurse’s stemmed from independent chains of transmission involving different villages and families in Guinea, the agency said.The WHO also said that the body of the 70-year-old Guinean, a grand imam, was not handled safely, raising the possibility that others were exposed to the virus during funeral rituals.In addition, the WHO said today that its overall Ebola case count in West Africa has exceeded 14,000, while the death toll has topped 5,100.Timeline of casesThe nurse, who worked at the Pasteur Clinic in Bamako, was isolated on the evening of Nov 10 after an alert from authorities in Guinea raised suspicion of Ebola, the WHO reported. A biosafety level 3 lab in Bamako confirmed the case yesterday, and the nurse died yesterday evening, the agency said.The WHO did not list the nurse’s sex or age, but a Reuter’s report today, which also did not specify the gender, said the nurse was 25.Explaining the background of the nurse’s case, the WHO said the 70-year-old imam from Guinea, who lived in Koruemale village in Signuiri prefecture, fell ill on Oct 17 and was admitted to a local clinic in Guinea the next day. The area had intense Ebola transmission from early July to mid-August.When the man didn’t improve, he was transferred to another clinic across the border in Mali, and on Oct 25 he and four family members traveled by car to Bamako to seek treatment at the Pasteur Clinic, the WHO said. He was suffering from acute kidney failure—often seen in late stages of Ebola virus disease—and was tested for multiple pathogens but not for Ebola.The man was treated at the Pasteur Clinic from Oct 25 to 27, when he died of kidney failure. “In addition, a friend who visited him at the clinic also died abruptly from an undiagnosed disease,” the WHO said. Both men probably had Ebola, but no samples are available, the agency said. The statement gave no other details about the friend.Because the 70-year-old was a grand imam, his body was taken to a Bamako mosque for a washing ceremony and was then returned to his home village in Guinea for funeral and burial rites. “Although these events are still under investigation, WHO staff assume that many mourners attended the ceremonies,” the WHO said.Concern about responseThe WHO said 28 healthcare workers who had contact with the deceased man at the Pasteur Clinic are under observation, and investigators are tracing contacts in the community, including at the Bamako mosque.The Reuters report said more than 90 people in Bamako were quarantined today in connection with the new cases. Among them are about 20 United Nations peacekeepers who were being treated at the Pasteur Clinic for injuries they suffered while serving in northern Mali, according to the report.The story also said there is growing concern about how long it took for authorities to implement Ebola control measures after the imam’s death. One aid worker who asked to remain anonymous told Reuters, “This case shows the lack of training of doctors in Bamako. This training should have been done six months ago.”In other findings, the WHO update said five of the imam’s family members also fell ill with probable or confirmed Ebola cases in recent days, and two of them died. They included all four relatives who accompanied him on the car trip to Bamako. The man’s son tested positive yesterday, and confirmation of his case increased the probability that the other illnesses were caused by Ebola.Case count, death toll climbIn a separate situation report today, the WHO said the total case count in West Africa’s epidemic through Nov 9 has reached 14,098, with a death toll of 5,160. Those numbers mark increases of 830 cases and 200 deaths since the previous update on Nov 7, which covered reports through Nov 4.The latest figures indicate 118 more cases and 88 deaths in Guinea since the last report, 203 new cases and 70 deaths in Liberia, and 506 new cases with 39 deaths in Sierra Leone.”There is some evidence that case incidence is no longer increasing nationally in Guinea and Liberia, but steep increases persist in Sierra Leone,” the report says. “A mixed picture emerges at the district level. Transmission is consistently high in Conakry and Macenta in Guinea; Montserrado in Liberia; and in the western and northern areas of Sierra Leone.”Declines in incidence are continuing in Lofa in Liberia and in Kenema and Kailahun in Sierra Leone, the WHO said, adding that cases and deaths continue to be under-reported.As for interventions, the WHO said 19 of 53 planned Ebola treatment centers are now open. “A total of 140 trained burial teams are on the ground, and more than 4400 burials have reportedly been conducted in a safe and dignified manner since the outbreak began. Samples from all 53 Ebola-affected districts can be sent to a laboratory within 24 hours by road,” the report said.Among observations on individual countries, the WHO said weekly case numbers in Liberia fell from mid-September to the end of October, but the decline has since stabilized, and a reversal of the trend is possible. Liberia reported 97 confirmed and probable cases in the week that ended Nov 8.”EVD transmission remains high in Sierra Leone, with 421 new confirmed cases reported in the week to 9 November,” the report states. “Much of this was driven by intense transmission in the country’s west and north. Transmission remains intense in the capital Freetown, which reported 77 new confirmed cases in the past week.”Intense transmission also continues in Guinea, despite a stabilizing trend in some districts, the WHO reported. It said 145 cases were newly confirmed in the week that ended Nov 9.Senegal vows to reopen Guinea borderIn other news, Senegal has decided to reopen its border with Guinea and resume flights to Liberia and Sierra Leone, according to yesterday’s situation report from the United Nations Mission for Ebola Emergency Response (UNMEER).In announcing the move, President Macky Sall said the step is in line with recommendations from the Economic Community of West African States. But he did not give a date for reopening the border and restoring air service, UNMEER reported.See also: Nov 12 WHO report on new cases in MaliNov 12 Reuters story on Mali casesNov 12 WHO Ebola response situation reportNov 11 UNMEER reportNov 7 WHO Ebola response situation reportlast_img read more

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Gantry duo moves with FCI

first_imgThe gantries, each of which had the dimensions 13.6 m x 8.1 m x 7.3 m, were transported by road, barge and sea in order to reach their final destination.Watch a video of the project below:  FCI is a member of the Project Cargo Network (PCN).www.fci-cie.comwww.projectcargonetwork.comlast_img

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Jumbo sets heavy lift record

first_imgThe first test was executed with a weight of 250 tonnes, with the weight gradually increasing to a maximum of 1,650 tonnes, which included a 10 percent overload. The final test was a tandem lift of 3,000 tonnes, which Jumbo says its new vessel “passed with distinction”.Jumbo Kinetic, which is the first of two new K3000 vessels in Jumbo’s fleet, has a dual lift capability of 3,000 tonnes and has Ice Class 1A Swedish/Finnish certification. The second K3000 vessel, Jumbo Fairmaster, is due to enter service in the third quarter of 2015.Having been ordered back in 2011, Jumbo Kinetic was finally delivered to Jumbo at the end of 2014, after disagreements between the heavy lift shipping company and Croatia’s Brodosplit shipyard. In January of this year, the vessel’s cranes were fitted in China. Jumbo Kinetic’s next commercial voyage starts in Zhangzhou and consists of two consecutive trips to Samsung Heavy Industries’ facility at Geoje Island in Korea.Watch a video of the test below:   www.jumbomaritime.nllast_img read more

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Estonians buy Latvian Lokomotive

first_imgLATVIAN rolling stock repair business Lokomotive has been bought by two Estonian firms for an undisclosed sum. Wagon parts supplier Skinest Projekt acquired its share through the purchase of Remlok, which owned a 49% stake in the company, while freight shipper Spacecom acquired a 36·4% stake in Lokomotive from Parangon.One of two rolling stock maintenance firms in Latvia, Lokomotive is based in the city of Daugavpils where it employs around 2500 people. In 2003 it repaired 134 diesel and 203 electric locomotives, reporting profits of 183500lats on a turnover of 11·4m lats. In the first quarter of 2004 the firm reported a loss of 322000 lats on a turnover of 2·5m. Up to 70% of Lokomotive’s business is for Russian customers, but work is also carried out for the Baltic states, Belarus, Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan. The new owners are planning a €3m investment programme for the plant. Chairman of Skinest Projekt Oleg Osinovski told the local media that ’Lokomotive has lost a significant market share both in the Baltic states and in the east’ in recent years, but ’by modernising the plant we hope to regain its former position.’last_img read more

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Somali army kills 37 Al-Shabaab militants in southern region

first_imgSomali military officers attend a training programme by the United Arab Emirates (UAE) at their military base in Mogadishu, Somalia November 1, 2017. Picture taken November 1, 2017. REUTERS/Feisal Omar – RC13D84CADA0 Recruits belonging to Somalia’s Al-Qaeda-linked Al-Shabab militant group march during a parade at a military training base in Afgoye, Somalia, on February 17, 2011. FEISAL OMAR/REUTERSSomali National Army (SNA) on Saturday killed 37 Al-Shabaab extremists in a fierce fight in the outskirts of Hudur town in the southern region of Bakol, officials confirmed on Sunday.Odawa Yusuf Rage, commander of SNA told journalists that the clashes started after government forces got intelligence of the militants’ presence in the area and conducted operations.“Our forces inflicted severe casualties on the militants, killing 37 of them, including the militants’ leader in Hudur area,” Rage said, adding that the army also recovered weapons from the militants.Locals told Xinhua there was an intense fight in Abal village in the outskirts of Hudur town which caused casualties from the warring sides and the residents.On May 27, Somali forces backed by the Southwestern State army killed six Al-Shabaab extremists in another operation in Dinsor town in the southern region of Bay.Government forces have intensified operations against Al-Shabaab extremists in the southern regions, but the militants still hold swathes of rural areas in those regions conducting ambushes and planting land mines.Related Somali army kills six Al-Shabaab militants in southern region Somali army kills 142 Al-Shabaab militants during operationcenter_img Somali army kills 12 Al-Shabaab militantslast_img read more

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Grand Bay man fined for wounding a police officer

first_img Tweet 7 Views   no discussions LocalNews Grand Bay man fined for wounding a police officer by: – May 22, 2013 Sharing is caring! Sharecenter_img Share Share Harold Alexander, 49, of Grand Bay has been charged for wounding, battery on police, resisting arrest and being in possession of an offensive weapon; a cutlass.He pleaded guilty to wounding and being armed with an offensive weapon and not guilty to the charges of battery on police and resisting arrest. The two which he pleaded not guilty to were withdrawn by the prosecution.According to the police prosecutor inspector Claude Weekes, at about 5:30pm the complainant; a police officer, was on duty at Grand Bay when his brother approached him and told him of an incident concerning some Grand Bay men who had attacked him.While relating the story to the officer, a car pulled up from which the defendant exited brandished a cutlass at the officer’s brother.The officer went in between the defendant and his brother, identified himself as a police officer and asked the defendant to drop the cutlass. Instead, the defendant made a swipe at the officer and injured him in the process.Officers from the Grand Bay police station came to assist the officer and on a number of occasions asked the defendant to put the cutlass down which he refused.He eventually ran away and left the cutlass behind before he was apprehended by police.Alexander was represented by attorney Peter Alleyne said it was a holiday weekend and his client was under the influence of alcohol.“You must stay away from alcohol and party less,” Magistrate Candia Carrette George told the defendant before sentencing him.Alexander was fined $1,500 for wounding which he has to pay by 31st August 2013 or in default of payment serve 4 months in prison and for being armed with an offensive weapon, $500, payable by 30th September 2013 or two months in prison if he fails to pay the fine.Dominica Vibes Newslast_img read more

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